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Items: 11

1.

Holt-Oram syndrome

Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) is characterized by upper-limb defects, congenital heart malformation, and cardiac conduction disease. Upper-limb malformations may be unilateral, bilateral/symmetric, or bilateral/asymmetric and can range from triphalangeal or absent thumb(s) to phocomelia. Other upper-limb malformations can include unequal arm length caused by aplasia or hypoplasia of the radius, fusion or anomalous development of the carpal and thenar bones, abnormal forearm pronation and supination, abnormal opposition of the thumb, sloping shoulders, and restriction of shoulder joint movement. An abnormal carpal bone is present in all affected individuals and may be the only evidence of disease. A congenital heart malformation is present in 75% of individuals with HOS and most commonly involves the septum. Atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect can vary in number, size, and location. Complex congenital heart malformations can also occur in individuals with HOS. Individuals with HOS with or without a congenital heart malformation are at risk for cardiac conduction disease. While individuals may present at birth with sinus bradycardia and first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block, AV block can progress unpredictably to a higher grade including complete heart block with and without atrial fibrillation. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
120524
Concept ID:
C0265264
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Cleidocranial dysostosis

Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) spectrum disorder is a skeletal dysplasia that represents a clinical continuum ranging from classic CCD (triad of delayed closure of the cranial sutures, hypoplastic or aplastic clavicles, and dental abnormalities) to mild CCD to isolated dental anomalies without the skeletal features. Most individuals come to diagnosis because they have classic features. At birth, affected individuals typically have abnormally large, wide-open fontanelles that may remain open throughout life. Clavicular hypoplasia can result in narrow, sloping shoulders that can be opposed at the midline. Moderate short stature may be observed, with most affected individuals being shorter than their unaffected sibs. Dental anomalies may include supernumerary teeth, eruption failure of the permanent teeth, and presence of the second permanent molar with the primary dentition. Individuals with CCD spectrum disorder are at increased risk of developing recurrent sinus infections, recurrent ear infections leading to conductive hearing loss, and upper-airway obstruction. Intelligence is typically normal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
3486
Concept ID:
C0008928
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Floating-Harbor syndrome

Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is characterized by typical craniofacial features; low birth weight, normal head circumference, and short stature; bone age delay that normalizes between ages six and 12 years; skeletal anomalies (brachydactyly, clubbing, clinodactyly, short thumbs, prominent joints, clavicular abnormalities); severe receptive and expressive language impairment; hypernasality and high-pitched voice; and intellectual disability that is typically mild to moderate. Difficulties with temperament and behavior that are present in many children tend to improve in adulthood. Other features can include hyperopia and/or strabismus, conductive hearing loss, seizures, gastroesophageal reflux, renal anomalies (e.g., hydronephrosis / renal pelviectasis, cysts, and/or agenesis), and genital anomalies (e.g., hypospadias and/or undescended testes). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
152667
Concept ID:
C0729582
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Brachydactyly type C

The brachydactyly type C (BDC) phenotype includes brachymesophalangy of fingers 2, 3, and 5. The fourth finger is usually unaffected and thus appears as the longest finger of the hand. Shortening of metacarpal 1 and hyperphalangy in fingers 2 and 3 may occur and can be considered relatively characteristic signs. BDC can be highly variable, ranging from severely affected hands with very short fingers to mildly affected cases with only moderate brachydactyly, most often affecting the middle and proximal phalanges of fingers 2 and 3 (summary by Lehmann et al., 2006). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
350590
Concept ID:
C1862103
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
5.

Metaphyseal dysplasia-maxillary hypoplasia-brachydacty syndrome

Metaphyseal dysplasia and maxillary hypoplasia with or without brachydactyly (MDMHB) is an autosomal dominant bone dysplasia characterized by metaphyseal flaring of long bones, enlargement of the medial halves of the clavicles, maxillary hypoplasia, variable brachydactyly, and dystrophic teeth (summary by Moffatt et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
762788
Concept ID:
C3549874
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Brachydactyly type A1C

Any brachydactyly type A1 in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the GDF5 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
767360
Concept ID:
C3554446
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Feingold syndrome type 2

Feingold syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by variable combinations of microcephaly, limb malformations, esophageal and duodenal atresias, and learning disability/mental retardation. Hand and foot abnormalities may include hypoplastic thumbs, clinodactyly of second and fifth fingers, syndactyly (characteristically between second and third and fourth and fifth toes), and shortened or absent middle phalanges. Cardiac and renal malformations, vertebral anomalies, and deafness have also been described in a minority of patients (summary by Teszas et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Feingold syndrome, see FGLDS1 (164280). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
482119
Concept ID:
C3280489
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Orofaciodigital syndrome 17

MedGen UID:
1644516
Concept ID:
C4693640
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Brachydactyly type A4

A type of brachydactyly characterized by brachymesophalangy affecting mainly the 2nd and 5th digits. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
354669
Concept ID:
C1862139
Congenital Abnormality
10.

Endove syndrome, limb-only type

Limb-only ENDOVE syndrome (ENDOVESL) is characterized by marked mesomelic shortening and deformation of the lower limbs due to severe hypoplasia of the tibia and fibula. Patients also exhibit abnormalities of the digits of the hands and feet, with cutaneous and osseous syndactyly as well as dysplastic, missing, and/or volar nails. In addition, genitourinary anomalies have been observed (Allou et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1787128
Concept ID:
C5543128
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Short middle phalanx of the 2nd finger

Hypoplasia (congenital reduction in size) of the middle phalanx of the second finger, also known as the index finger. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
867077
Concept ID:
C4021435
Anatomical Abnormality
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