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1.

Marfan syndrome

FBN1-related Marfan syndrome (Marfan syndrome), a systemic disorder of connective tissue with a high degree of clinical variability, comprises a broad phenotypic continuum ranging from mild (features of Marfan syndrome in one or a few systems) to severe and rapidly progressive neonatal multiorgan disease. Cardinal manifestations involve the ocular, skeletal, and cardiovascular systems. Ocular findings include myopia (>50% of affected individuals); ectopia lentis (seen in approximately 60% of affected individuals); and an increased risk for retinal detachment, glaucoma, and early cataracts. Skeletal system manifestations include bone overgrowth and joint laxity; disproportionately long extremities for the size of the trunk (dolichostenomelia); overgrowth of the ribs that can push the sternum in (pectus excavatum) or out (pectus carinatum); and scoliosis that ranges from mild to severe and progressive. The major morbidity and early mortality in Marfan syndrome relate to the cardiovascular system and include dilatation of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva (predisposing to aortic tear and rupture), mitral valve prolapse with or without regurgitation, tricuspid valve prolapse, and enlargement of the proximal pulmonary artery. Severe and prolonged regurgitation of the mitral and/or aortic valve can predispose to left ventricular dysfunction and occasionally heart failure. With proper management, the life expectancy of someone with Marfan syndrome approximates that of the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
44287
Concept ID:
C0024796
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Loeys-Dietz syndrome 2

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
382398
Concept ID:
C2674574
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Loeys-Dietz syndrome 1

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1646567
Concept ID:
C4551955
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
462437
Concept ID:
C3151087
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Weill-Marchesani syndrome 2, dominant

Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by abnormalities of the lens of the eye, short stature, brachydactyly, joint stiffness, and cardiovascular defects. The ocular problems, typically recognized in childhood, include microspherophakia (small spherical lens), myopia secondary to the abnormal shape of the lens, ectopia lentis (abnormal position of the lens), and glaucoma, which can lead to blindness. Height of adult males is 142-169 cm; height of adult females is 130-157 cm. Autosomal recessive WMS cannot be distinguished from autosomal dominant WMS by clinical findings alone. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
358388
Concept ID:
C1869115
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Ectopia lentis 1, isolated, autosomal dominant

Ectopia lentis is defined as an abnormal stretching of the zonular fibers that leads to lens dislocation, resulting in acute or chronic visual impairment (Greene et al., 2010). Citing the revised Ghent criteria for Marfan syndrome, Loeys et al. (2010) proposed the designation 'ectopia lentis syndrome' (ELS) for patients with ectopia lentis and a mutation in the FBN1 gene who lack aortic involvement, to highlight the systemic nature of the condition and to emphasize the need for assessment of features outside the ocular system (see DIAGNOSIS). Genetic Heterogeneity of Isolated Ectopia Lentis An autosomal recessive form of isolated ectopia lentis (ECTOL2; 225100) is caused by mutation in the ADAMTSL4 gene (610113). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
762106
Concept ID:
C3541518
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Loeys-Dietz syndrome 4

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
766676
Concept ID:
C3553762
Disease or Syndrome
8.

X-linked intellectual disability Cabezas type

The Cabezas type of X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder is characterized primarily by short stature, hypogonadism, and abnormal gait, with other more variable features such as speech delay, prominent lower lip, and tremor (Cabezas et al., 2000). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
337334
Concept ID:
C1845861
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to tenascin-X deficiency

The clinical features of TNXB-related classical-like Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (clEDS) strongly resemble those seen in classic EDS (cEDS). Affected individuals have generalized joint hypermobility, hyperextensible skin, and easy bruising, but do not have atrophic scarring, as is seen in cEDS. There are also several other distinguishing clinical findings including anomalies of feet and hands, edema in the legs in the absence of cardiac failure, mild proximal and distal muscle weakness, and axonal polyneuropathy. Vaginal, uterine, and/or rectal prolapse can also occur. Tissue fragility with resulting rupture of the trachea, esophagus, and small and large bowel has been reported. Vascular fragility causing a major event occurs in a minority of individuals. Significant variability in the severity of musculoskeletal symptoms and their effect on day-to-day function between unrelated affected individuals as well as among affected individuals in the same family has been reported. Fatigue has been reported in more than half of affected individuals. The severity of symptoms in middle-aged individuals can range from joint hypermobility without complications to being wheelchair-bound as a result of severe and painful foot deformities and fatigue. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
336244
Concept ID:
C1848029
Disease or Syndrome
10.

MASS syndrome

A genetic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. Connective tissue is the material between the cells of the body that gives tissues form and strength. Symptoms include mitral valve prolapse, nearsightedness, borderline and non-progressive aortic enlargement, and skin and skeletal findings that overlap with those seen in Marfan syndrome. Treatment is based on the individuals symptoms. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
346932
Concept ID:
C1858556
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, type 3

Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is generally considered the least severe type of EDS, although significant complications, primarily musculoskeletal, can and do occur. The skin is often soft and may be mildly hyperextensible. Subluxations and dislocations are common; they may occur spontaneously or with minimal trauma and can be acutely painful. Degenerative joint disease is common. Chronic pain, distinct from that associated with acute dislocations, is a serious complication of the condition and can be both physically and psychologically disabling. Easy bruising, functional bowel disorders, and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction are common. Aortic root dilation, when present, is typically of a mild degree with no increased risk of dissection in the absence of significant dilation. Psychological dysfunction, psychosocial impairment, and emotional problems are common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75670
Concept ID:
C0268337
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 1

Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is a form of ACTH-independent adrenal hyperplasia resulting in Cushing syndrome. It is usually seen as a manifestation of the Carney complex (CNC1; 160980), a multiple neoplasia syndrome. However, PPNAD can also occur in isolation (Groussin et al., 2002). Genetic Heterogeneity of Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease See also PPNAD2 (610475), caused by mutation in the PDE11A gene (604961) on chromosome 2q31; PPNAD3 (614190), caused by mutation in the PDE8B gene (603390) on chromosome 5q13; and PPNAD4 (615830), caused by a duplication on chromosome 19p13 that includes the PRKACA gene (601639). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
400627
Concept ID:
C1864846
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 10

Any familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the LOX gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
924785
Concept ID:
C4284414
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Pituitary dependent hypercortisolism

AIP familial isolated pituitary adenoma (AIP-FIPA) is defined as the presence of an AIP germline pathogenic variant in an individual with a pituitary adenoma (regardless of family history). The most commonly occurring pituitary adenomas in this disorder are growth hormone-secreting adenomas (somatotropinoma), followed by prolactin-secreting adenomas (prolactinoma), growth hormone and prolactin co-secreting adenomas (somatomammotropinoma), and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA). Rarely TSH-secreting adenomas (thyrotropinomas) are observed. Clinical findings result from excess hormone secretion, lack of hormone secretion, and/or mass effects (e.g., headaches, visual field loss). Within the same family, pituitary adenomas can be of the same or different type. Age of onset in AIP-FIPA is usually in the second or third decade. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
66381
Concept ID:
C0221406
Disease or Syndrome
15.

MVP1

Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) has a prevalence of approximately 2 to 3% in the general population. It is characterized by fibromyxomatous changes in mitral leaflet tissue, with upward displacement of 1 or both leaflets into the left atrium during systole; MVP is diagnosed when the movement of the mitral leaflets exceeds 2 mm. In classic MVP, leaflets are at least 5 mm thick, whereas in nonclassic MVP, they are less than 5 mm thick. Auscultatory findings, when present, consist of a midsystolic click and/or a late systolic murmur. The natural history of MVP varies from benign, with a normal life expectancy, to severe complications associated with the development of significant mitral regurgitation, including congestive heart failure, bacterial endocarditis, atrial fibrillation, thromboembolism, and even sudden death. However, complications are uncommon, affecting less than 3% of individuals with MVP (Freed et al., 1999; Grau et al., 2007; Delling and Vasan, 2014). Grau et al. (2007) provided a detailed review of the genetics of mitral valve prolapse. Delling and Vasan (2014) reviewed the epidemiology and pathophysiology of MVP, with discussion of disease progression, genetics, and molecular basis. Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Mitral Valve Prolapse The locus for MVP1 has been mapped to chromosome 16p; the locus for MVP2 (607829) has been mapped to chromosome 11p. Mitral valve prolapse-3 (MVP3; 610840) is caused by mutation in the DZIP1 gene (608671) on chromosome 13q32. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
320443
Concept ID:
C1834819
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Meester-Loeys syndrome

Meester-Loeys syndrome (MRLS) is an X-linked disorder characterized by early-onset aortic aneurysm and dissection. Other recurrent findings include hypertelorism, pectus deformity, joint hypermobility, contractures, and mild skeletal dysplasia (Meester et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934778
Concept ID:
C4310811
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Loeys-Dietz syndrome 6

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1794251
Concept ID:
C5562041
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Intellectual developmental disorder 62

DLG4-related synaptopathy is a condition that affects neurological development. This condition is characterized by delayed development and mild to moderate intellectual disabilities that typically becomes evident before age 2. Over time, many individuals with DLG4-related synaptopathy lose skills that they have learned, such as speech or motor skills. About 20 percent of people with this condition cannot speak. Affected individuals often have neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. About half of individuals with this condition have recurrent seizures (epilepsy) that typically begin in childhood. Brain changes can also occur. These include brain tissue loss (atrophy) and abnormalities of the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain (corpus callosum) or the  hippocampus, which is a region of the brain that is involved in learning and memory.

Individuals with DLG4-related synaptopathy can also have weak muscle tone (hyptonia), loose joints (joint laxity), or a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis). Movement problems, including impaired muscle coordination (ataxia), involuntary muscle coordination (dystonia), or rhythmic shaking (tremor) are common in people with this condition. Other problems can include migraine, sleep problems, or anxiety. Some people with DLG4-related synaptopathy have a distinctive body type that includes a long face, slim body, and long fingers.

Less commonly, DLG4-related synaptopathy can affect a person's vision. Affected individuals can have eyes that do not point in the same direction (strabismus), farsightedness (hyperopia), or involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus). Some affected individuals have blindness because the area of the brain responsible for processing vision is impaired. 

DLG4-related synaptopathy can also cause gastrointestinal difficulties that make it difficult to eat. These can include a backflow of stomach acids into the esophagus (gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD).

 [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
1712636
Concept ID:
C5394083
Disease or Syndrome
19.
20.

Fibromuscular dysplasia, multifocal

Multifocal fibromuscular dysplasia (FMDMF) is characterized histologically by medial fibroplasia and angiographically by multiple arterial stenoses with intervening mural dilations. Arterial tortuosity, macroaneurysms, dissections, and rupture may occur (summary by Richer et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1778238
Concept ID:
C5543412
Disease or Syndrome
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