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Items: 8

1.

Sotos syndrome

Sotos syndrome is characterized by a distinctive facial appearance (broad and prominent forehead with a dolichocephalic head shape, sparse frontotemporal hair, downslanting palpebral fissures, malar flushing, long and narrow face, long chin); learning disability (early developmental delay, mild-to-severe intellectual impairment); and overgrowth (height and/or head circumference =2 SD above the mean). These three clinical features are considered the cardinal features of Sotos syndrome. Major features of Sotos syndrome include behavioral problems (most notably autistic spectrum disorder), advanced bone age, cardiac anomalies, cranial MRI/CT abnormalities, joint hyperlaxity with or without pes planus, maternal preeclampsia, neonatal complications, renal anomalies, scoliosis, and seizures. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
61232
Concept ID:
C0175695
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Wilson-Turner syndrome

Wilson-Turner syndrome (WTS) is an X-linked recessive neurologic disorder characterized by intellectual disability, dysmorphic facial features, hypogonadism, short stature, and truncal obesity. Females are unaffected (Wilson et al., 1991). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
333393
Concept ID:
C1839736
Disease or Syndrome
3.

X-linked intellectual disability, Cantagrel type

X-linked intellectual developmental disorder-98 (XLID98) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, poor speech, behavioral abnormalities, poor overall growth, dysmorphic facial features, and often early-onset seizures. Some carrier females are unaffected, whereas other females with mutations are affected; males tend to be more severely affected than females. It is believed that the phenotypic variability and disease manifestations in female carriers results from skewed X-inactivation or cellular mosaicism (summary by de Lange et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
813060
Concept ID:
C3806730
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Stuttering, familial persistent, 1

Stuttering is a disorder of the flow of speech characterized by involuntary repetitions or prolongations of sounds or syllables, and by interruptions of speech known as blocks (summary by Raza et al., 2010). Stuttering typically arises in young children, where it affects at least 15% of those in age range 4 to 6 years (Bloodstein, 1995). Stuttering usually resolves spontaneously before adolescence, leading to a population prevalence of 1 to 2% among adults. Stuttering beyond childhood is characterized by a significant bias towards males, with males outnumbering females by a ratio of 3:1 to 5:1 (Yairi et al., 1996). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Persistent Stuttering Also see STUT2 (609261), mapped to chromosome 12q24; STUT3 (614655), mapped to chromosome 3q; and STUT4 (614668) mapped to chromosome 16q. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
483580
Concept ID:
C3489627
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Acute infantile liver failure-cerebellar ataxia-peripheral sensory motor neuropathy syndrome

Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-21 (SCAR21) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of cerebellar ataxia associated with cerebellar atrophy in early childhood. Affected individuals also have recurrent episodes of liver failure in the first decade, resulting in chronic liver fibrosis, as well as later onset of a peripheral neuropathy. Mild learning disabilities may also occur (summary by Schmidt et al., 2015). The phenotype is highly variable: all patients appear to have episodic and severe liver dysfunction in early childhood that tends to resolve with age. Affected individuals also show mild developmental or language delay and/or later onset of variable neurologic features, such as motor dysfunction (summary by Lenz et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1800507
Concept ID:
C5569084
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Snijders Blok-Campeau syndrome

Snijders Blok-Campeau syndrome (SNIBCPS) is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and delayed speech acquisition. Affected individuals tend to have expressive language deficits, with speech apraxia and dysarthria. Other features include macrocephaly and characteristic facial features, such as prominent forehead and hypertelorism, hypotonia, and joint laxity. The severity of the neurologic deficits and presence of nonneurologic features is variable (summary by Snijders Blok et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648495
Concept ID:
C4748701
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Familial hypertryptophanemia

Congenital hypertryptophanemia, which is accompanied by hyperserotonemia, does not appear to have significant clinical consequences (Ferreira et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
419177
Concept ID:
C2931837
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Stuttering

Disruptions in the production of speech sounds, with involuntary repetitions of words or parts of words, prolongations of speech sounds, or complete blockage of speech production for several seconds. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
20981
Concept ID:
C0038506
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
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