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Items: 8

1.

Alstrom syndrome

Alström syndrome is characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, obesity, progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, acute infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and/or adolescent- or adult-onset restrictive cardiomyopathy, insulin resistance / type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and chronic progressive kidney disease. Cone-rod dystrophy presents as progressive visual impairment, photophobia, and nystagmus usually starting between birth and age 15 months. Many individuals lose all perception of light by the end of the second decade, but a minority retain the ability to read large print into the third decade. Children usually have normal birth weight but develop truncal obesity during their first year. Sensorineural hearing loss presents in the first decade in as many as 70% of individuals and may progress to the severe or moderately severe range (40-70 db) by the end of the first to second decade. Insulin resistance is typically accompanied by the skin changes of acanthosis nigricans, and proceeds to T2DM in the majority by the third decade. Nearly all demonstrate hypertriglyceridemia. Other findings can include endocrine abnormalities (hypothyroidism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in males, and hyperandrogenism in females), urologic dysfunction / detrusor instability, progressive decrease in renal function, and hepatic disease (ranging from elevated transaminases to steatohepatitis/NAFLD). Approximately 20% of affected individuals have delay in early developmental milestones, most commonly in gross and fine motor skills. About 30% have a learning disability. Cognitive impairment (IQ <70) is very rare. Wide clinical variability is observed among affected individuals, even within the same family. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78675
Concept ID:
C0268425
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Exudative vitreoretinopathy 1

Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited disorder characterized by the incomplete development of the retinal vasculature. Its clinical appearance varies considerably, even within families, with severely affected patients often registered as blind during infancy, whereas mildly affected patients with few or no visual problems may have such a small area of avascularity in their peripheral retina that it is visible only by fluorescein angiography. It is believed that this peripheral avascularity is the primary anomaly in FEVR and results from defective retinal angiogenesis. The sight-threatening features of the FEVR phenotype are considered secondary to retinal avascularity and develop because of the resulting retinal ischemia; they include the development of hyperpermeable blood vessels, neovascularization, vitreoretinal traction, retinal folds, and retinal detachments (summary by Poulter et al., 2010). In 31 Chinese pedigrees clinically diagnosed with FEVR, Rao et al. (2017) analyzed 6 FEVR-associated genes and identified mutations in 12 of the probands, including 5 (16.1%) in LRP5, 3 (9.7%) in NDP, 2 (6.5%) in FZD4, and 1 (3.2%) in TSPAN12. In addition, a mutation in the KIF11 gene (148760) was identified in a patient who also exhibited microcephaly (MCLMR; 152950). The authors noted that their detection rate did not exceed 50%, suggesting that other FEVR-associated genes remained to be discovered. Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy Also see EVR2 (305390), caused by mutation in the NDP gene (300658) on chromosome Xp11; EVR3 (605750), mapped to 11p13-p12; EVR4 (601813), caused by mutations in the LRP5 gene (603506) on 11q13.4; EVR5 (613310), caused by mutation in the TSPAN12 gene (613138) on 7q31; EVR6 (616468), caused by mutation in the ZNF408 gene (616454) on 11p11; and EVR7 (617572), caused by mutation in the CTNNB1 gene (116806) on chromosome 3p22. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
343561
Concept ID:
C1851402
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Exudative vitreoretinopathy 4

Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited disorder characterized by the incomplete development of the retinal vasculature. Its clinical appearance varies considerably, even within families, with severely affected patients often registered as blind during infancy, whereas mildly affected patients with few or no visual problems may have such a small area of avascularity in their peripheral retina that it is visible only by fluorescein angiography. It is believed that this peripheral avascularity is the primary anomaly in FEVR and results from defective retinal angiogenesis. The sight-threatening features of the FEVR phenotype are considered secondary to retinal avascularity and develop because of the resulting retinal ischemia; they include the development of hyperpermeable blood vessels, neovascularization, vitreoretinal traction, retinal folds, and retinal detachments (summary by Poulter et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, see EVR1 (133780). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
356171
Concept ID:
C1866176
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Retinitis pigmentosa 13

Any retinitis pigmentosa in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PRPF8 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
325486
Concept ID:
C1838702
Disease or Syndrome
5.

PHARC syndrome

Fiskerstrand type peripheral neuropathy is a slowly-progressive Refsum-like disorder associating signs of peripheral neuropathy with late-onset hearing loss, cataract and pigmentary retinopathy that become evident during the third decade of life. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
436373
Concept ID:
C2675204
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Triglyceride storage disease with ichthyosis

Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS) is a rare autosomal recessive nonlysosomal inborn error of neutral lipid metabolism. Patients present with a nonbullous erythrodermic form of ichthyosis (NCIE; see 242300) with variable involvement of other organs, such as liver, central nervous system, eyes, and ears. Intracellular triacylglycerol droplets are present in most tissues, and diagnosis can be confirmed by a simple blood smear, in which the characteristic lipid droplets are observed in the cytoplasm of granulocytes (summary by Lefevre et al., 2001). Another form of neutral lipid storage disease without ichthyosis but with myopathy (NLSDM; 610717) is caused by mutation in the PNPLA2 gene (609059). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82780
Concept ID:
C0268238
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Retinitis pigmentosa-intellectual disability-deafness-hypogenitalism syndrome

A rare syndromic retinitis pigmentosa characterized by pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus with hyperinsulinism, acanthosis nigricans, secondary cataracts, neurogenic deafness, short stature mild hypogonadism in males and polycystic ovaries with oligomenorrhea in females. Inheritance is thought to be autosomal recessive. It can be distinguished from Alstrom syndrome (see this term) by the presence of intellectual disability and the absence of renal insufficiency. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1993. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
340317
Concept ID:
C1849401
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Subcapsular cataract

A cataract that affects the region of the lens directly beneath the capsule of the lens. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
65903
Concept ID:
C0235259
Acquired Abnormality; Finding
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