U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 9

1.

Glutaric aciduria, type 1

The phenotypic spectrum of untreated glutaric acidemia type 1 (GA-1) ranges from the more common form (infantile-onset disease) to the less common form (later-onset disease – i.e., after age 6 years). Of note, the GA-1 phenotype can vary widely between untreated family members with the same genotype, primarily as a function of the age at which the first acute encephalopathic crisis occurred: three months to six years in infantile-onset GA-1 and after age six years in later-onset GA-1. Characteristically these crises result in acute bilateral striatal injury and subsequent complex movement disorders. In the era of newborn screening (NBS), the prompt initiation of treatment of asymptomatic infants detected by NBS means that most individuals who would have developed manifestations of either infantile-onset or later-onset GA-1 remain asymptomatic; however, they may be at increased risk for other manifestations (e.g., renal disease) that are becoming apparent as the understanding of the natural history of treated GA-1 continues to evolve. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
124337
Concept ID:
C0268595
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Congenital afibrinogenemia

Inherited disorders of fibrinogen affect either the quantity (afibrinogenemia and hypofibrinogenemia; 202400) or the quality (dysfibrinogenemia; 616004) of the circulating fibrinogen or both (hypodysfibrinogenemia; see 616004). Afibrinogenemia is characterized by the complete absence of immunoreactive fibrinogen. Bleeding due to afibrinogenemia usually manifests in the neonatal period, with 85% of cases presenting umbilical cord bleeding, but a later age of onst is not unusual. Bleeding may occur in the skin, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or the central nervous system, with intracranial hemorrhage being reported as the major cause of death. Patients are susceptible to spontaneous rupture of the spleen. Menstruating women may experience menometrorrhagia. First-trimester abortion is common. Both arterial and venous thromboembolic complications have been reported (summary by de Moerloose and Neerman-Arbez, 2009). Hypofibrinogenemia is characterized by reduced amounts of immunoreactive fibrinogen. Patients are often heterozygous carriers of afibrinogenemia mutations and are usually asymptomatic. However, they may bleed when exposed to trauma or if they have a second associated hemostatic abnormality. Women may experience miscarriages. Liver disease occurs in rare cases (summary by de Moerloose and Neerman-Arbez, 2009). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
749036
Concept ID:
C2584774
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Glanzmann thrombasthenia

Glanzmann thrombasthenia is a bleeding disorder that is characterized by prolonged or spontaneous bleeding starting from birth. People with Glanzmann thrombasthenia tend to bruise easily, have frequent nosebleeds (epistaxis), and may bleed from the gums. They may also develop red or purple spots on the skin caused by bleeding underneath the skin (petechiae) or swelling caused by bleeding within tissues (hematoma). Glanzmann thrombasthenia can also cause prolonged bleeding following injury, trauma, or surgery (including dental work). Women with this condition can have prolonged and sometimes abnormally heavy menstrual bleeding. Affected women also have an increased risk of excessive blood loss during pregnancy and childbirth.

About a quarter of individuals with Glanzmann thrombasthenia have bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract, which often occurs later in life. Rarely, affected individuals have bleeding inside the skull (intracranial hemorrhage) or joints (hemarthrosis).

The severity and frequency of the bleeding episodes in Glanzmann thrombasthenia can vary greatly among affected individuals, even in the same family. Spontaneous bleeding tends to become less frequent with age. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
52736
Concept ID:
C0040015
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Fetal akinesia-cerebral and retinal hemorrhage syndrome

A rare lethal congenital myopathy syndrome characterized by decreased fetal movements and polyhydramnios in utero and the presence of akinesia, severe hypotonia with respiratory insufficiency, absent reflexes, joint contractures, skeletal abnormalities with thin ribs and bones, intracranial and retinal hemorrhages and decreased birth weight in the neonate. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
1631944
Concept ID:
C4706410
Disease or Syndrome
5.

TARP syndrome

The classic features of TARP syndrome are talipes equinovarus, atrial septal defect, Robin sequence (micrognathia, cleft palate, and glossoptosis), and persistent left superior vena cava. Not all patients have all classic features. Some patients have the additional features of central nervous system dysfunction, renal abnormalities, variable cardiac anomalies including hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, and variable distal limb defects including syndactyly. Most patients die in late prenatal or early postnatal stages (summary by Kaeppler et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
333324
Concept ID:
C1839463
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity-predominant, 2b, prenatal onset, autosomal dominant

SMALED2B is a severe neuromuscular disorder with onset in utero. Affected individuals show decreased fetal movements and are usually born with congenital contractures consistent with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). After birth, they have severe hypotonia and muscle atrophy as well as respiratory insufficiency due to muscle weakness. Some patients may have dysmorphic facial features and/or abnormalities on brain imaging. Many patients die in early childhood (summary by Storbeck et al., 2017) For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lower extremity-predominant spinal muscular atrophy, see SMALED1 (158600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648362
Concept ID:
C4749003
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Congenital myopathy 2c, severe infantile, autosomal dominant

Congenital myopathy-2C (CMYP2C) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by severe congenital weakness usually resulting in death from respiratory failure in the first year or so of life. Patients present at birth with hypotonia, lack of antigravity movements, poor head control, and difficulties feeding or breathing, often requiring tube-feeding and mechanical ventilation. Decreased fetal movements may be observed in some cases. Of the patients with congenital myopathy caused by mutation in the ACTA1 gene, about 90% carry heterozygous mutations that are usually de novo and cause the severe infantile phenotype. Some patients with heterozygous mutations have a more typical and milder disease course with delayed motor development and proximal muscle weakness, but are able to achieve independent ambulation (CMYP2A; 161800). The severity of the disease most likely depends on the detrimental effect of the mutation, although there are probably additional modifying factors (Ryan et al., 2001; Laing et al., 2009; Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001; Agrawal et al., 2004; Nowak et al., 2013; Sewry et al., 2019; Laitila and Wallgren-Pettersson, 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1840969
Concept ID:
C5830333
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type Iw, autosomal dominant

Autosomal dominant congenital disorder of glycosylation type Iw (CDG1WAD) is characterized by variable skeletal anomalies, short stature, macrocephaly, and dysmorphic features; about half of patients have impaired intellectual development. Additional features include increased muscle tone and muscle cramps (Wilson et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794278
Concept ID:
C5562068
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Subdural hemorrhage

Hemorrhage occurring between the dura mater and the arachnoid mater. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
6775
Concept ID:
C0018946
Pathologic Function
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity