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Items: 11

1.

Autoimmune thyroid disease, susceptibility to, 3

MedGen UID:
374932
Concept ID:
C1842444
Finding
2.

Celiac disease, susceptibility to, 1

Celiac disease is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be associated with gastrointestinal findings (diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain and distension, bloating, vomiting, and weight loss) and/or highly variable non-gastrointestinal findings (dermatitis herpetiformis, chronic fatigue, joint pain/inflammation, iron deficiency anemia, migraines, depression, attention-deficit disorder, epilepsy, osteoporosis/osteopenia, infertility and/or recurrent fetal loss, vitamin deficiencies, short stature, failure to thrive, delayed puberty, dental enamel defects, and autoimmune disorders). Classic celiac disease, characterized by mild to severe gastrointestinal symptoms, is less common than non-classic celiac disease, characterized by absence of gastrointestinal symptoms. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
395227
Concept ID:
C1859310
Finding
3.

Combined immunodeficiency due to LRBA deficiency

Common variable immunodeficiency-8 with autoimmunity is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation. Affected individuals have early childhood onset of recurrent infections, particularly respiratory infections, and also develop variable autoimmune disorders, including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and inflammatory bowel disease. The presentation and phenotype are highly variable, even within families (summary by Lopez-Herrera et al., 2012 and Alangari et al., 2012). Immunologic findings are also variable and may include decreased B cells, hypogammaglobulinemia, and deficiency of CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells (Charbonnier et al., 2015). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of common variable immunodeficiency, see CVID1 (607594). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766426
Concept ID:
C3553512
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Cowden syndrome 5

PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS) encompasses a range of clinical findings in which the core features are congenital or early-childhood onset of segmental/focal overgrowth with or without cellular dysplasia. Prior to the identification of PIK3CA as the causative gene, PROS was separated into distinct clinical syndromes based on the tissues and/or organs involved (e.g., MCAP [megalencephaly-capillary malformation] syndrome and CLOVES [congenital lipomatous asymmetric overgrowth of the trunk, lymphatic, capillary, venous, and combined-type vascular malformations, epidermal nevi, skeletal and spinal anomalies] syndrome). The predominant areas of overgrowth include the brain, limbs (including fingers and toes), trunk (including abdomen and chest), and face, all usually in an asymmetric distribution. Generalized brain overgrowth may be accompanied by secondary overgrowth of specific brain structures resulting in ventriculomegaly, a markedly thick corpus callosum, and cerebellar tonsillar ectopia with crowding of the posterior fossa. Vascular malformations may include capillary, venous, and less frequently, arterial or mixed (capillary-lymphatic-venous or arteriovenous) malformations. Lymphatic malformations may be in various locations (internal and/or external) and can cause various clinical issues, including swelling, pain, and occasionally localized bleeding secondary to trauma. Lipomatous overgrowth may occur ipsilateral or contralateral to a vascular malformation, if present. The degree of intellectual disability appears to be mostly related to the presence and severity of seizures, cortical dysplasia (e.g., polymicrogyria), and hydrocephalus. Many children have feeding difficulties that are often multifactorial in nature. Endocrine issues affect a small number of individuals and most commonly include hypoglycemia (largely hypoinsulinemic hypoketotic hypoglycemia), hypothyroidism, and growth hormone deficiency. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
767432
Concept ID:
C3554518
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Immunodeficiency due to CD25 deficiency

Immunodeficiency-41 is an autosomal recessive complex disorder of immune dysregulation. Affected individuals present in infancy with recurrent viral, fungal, and bacterial infections, lymphadenopathy, and variable autoimmune features, such as autoimmune enteropathy and eczematous skin lesions. Immunologic studies show a defect in T-cell regulation (summary by Goudy et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
377894
Concept ID:
C1853392
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Cowden syndrome 6



The features of Cowden syndrome overlap with those of another disorder called Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome. People with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome also develop hamartomas and other noncancerous tumors.  Some people with Cowden syndrome have relatives diagnosed with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and other affected individuals have the characteristic features of both conditions. Based on these similarities, researchers have proposed that Cowden syndrome and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome represent a spectrum of overlapping features known as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (named for the genetic cause of the conditions) instead of two distinct conditions.

Some people do not meet the strict criteria for a clinical diagnosis of Cowden syndrome, but they have some of the characteristic features of the condition, particularly the cancers. These individuals are often described as having Cowden-like syndrome. Both Cowden syndrome and Cowden-like syndrome are caused by mutations in the same genes.

Cowden syndrome is associated with an increased risk of developing several types of cancer, particularly cancers of the breast, a gland in the lower neck called the thyroid, and the lining of the uterus (the endometrium). Other cancers that have been identified in people with Cowden syndrome include kidney cancer, colorectal cancer, and an agressive form of skin cancer called melanoma. Compared with the general population, people with Cowden syndrome develop these cancers at younger ages, often beginning in their thirties or forties. People with Cowden syndrome are also more likely to develop more than one cancer during their lifetimes compared to the general population. Other diseases of the breast, thyroid, and endometrium are also common in Cowden syndrome. Additional signs and symptoms can include an enlarged head (macrocephaly) and a rare, noncancerous brain tumor called Lhermitte-Duclos disease. A small percentage of affected individuals have delayed development, intellectual disability, or autism spectrum disorder, which can affect communication and social interaction.

Almost everyone with Cowden syndrome develops hamartomas. These growths are most commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes (such as the lining of the mouth and nose), but they can also occur in the intestine and other parts of the body. The growth of hamartomas on the skin and mucous membranes typically becomes apparent by a person's late twenties.

Cowden syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by multiple noncancerous, tumor-like growths called hamartomas and an increased risk of developing certain cancers. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
767433
Concept ID:
C3554519
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Autoinflammation with arthritis and dyskeratosis

Autoinflammation with arthritis and dyskeratosis (AIADK) is characterized by recurrent fever, widespread skin dyskeratosis, arthritis, elevated biologic markers of inflammation, and mild autoimmunity with a high transitional B-cell level (summary by Grandemange et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1380109
Concept ID:
C4479278
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome with immune dysregulation 2, autosomal dominant

Autosomal dominant growth hormone insensitivity syndrome with immune dysregulation-2 (GHISID2) is a congenital disorder characterized by short stature due to insensitivity to growth hormone (GH1; 139250). Affected individuals usually have delayed bone age, delayed puberty, and decreased serum IGF1 (147440). Some patients may have features of mild immune dysregulation, such as eczema, increased serum IgE, asthma, or celiac disease (summary by Klammt et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1723138
Concept ID:
C5436546
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Autoinflammatory syndrome with immunodeficiency

Familial autoinflammatory syndrome with or without immunodeficiency (AISIMD) is characterized by onset of various autoimmune features usually in the first decades of life, although later onset has been reported. Typical features include autoimmune cytopenia, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and lymphadenopathy. More variable features may include autoimmune thyroiditis, psoriasis or eczema, nephritis, hepatitis, and symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; see 152700). Some patients may have recurrent infections or exacerbation of the disease with acute infection. Laboratory studies show variable findings, often decreased numbers of naive B cells, lymphopenia with skewed subsets, hypogammaglobulinemia, presence of autoantibodies, and a hyperinflammatory state. The disorder shows autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance (summary by Hadjadj et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1784363
Concept ID:
C5543547
Disease or Syndrome
10.

PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome with granular cell tumor

MedGen UID:
400984
Concept ID:
C1866376
Neoplastic Process
11.

Thyroiditis

Inflammation of the thyroid gland. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
21548
Concept ID:
C0040147
Disease or Syndrome
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