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1.

Exudative vitreoretinopathy 4

Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited disorder characterized by the incomplete development of the retinal vasculature. Its clinical appearance varies considerably, even within families, with severely affected patients often registered as blind during infancy, whereas mildly affected patients with few or no visual problems may have such a small area of avascularity in their peripheral retina that it is visible only by fluorescein angiography. It is believed that this peripheral avascularity is the primary anomaly in FEVR and results from defective retinal angiogenesis. The sight-threatening features of the FEVR phenotype are considered secondary to retinal avascularity and develop because of the resulting retinal ischemia; they include the development of hyperpermeable blood vessels, neovascularization, vitreoretinal traction, retinal folds, and retinal detachments (summary by Poulter et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, see EVR1 (133780). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
356171
Concept ID:
C1866176
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Exudative vitreoretinopathy 5

Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy is an inherited blinding disorder caused by defects in the development of retinal vasculature. There is extensive variation in disease severity among patients, even between members of the same family. Severely affected individuals often are registered as blind during infancy and can present with a phenotype resembling retinal dysplasia. Conversely, mildly affected individuals frequently have few or no visual problems and may have just a small area of avascularity in their peripheral retina, detectable only by fluorescein angiography (summary by Poulter et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR), see EVR1 (133780). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
412872
Concept ID:
C2750079
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Exudative vitreoretinopathy 6

Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy is a hereditary disorder that can cause vision loss that worsens over time. This condition affects the retina, the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye. In people with this disorder, blood vessels do not fully develop at the outer edges (periphery) of the retina, which reduces the blood supply to this tissue. This prolonged reduction in blood supply (chronic ischemia) causes continued damage to the retina and can lead to worsening of the condition. 

Some people with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy also have a condition known as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome, which is characterized by reduced bone density. People with this condition have weakened bones and an increased risk of fractures.

The signs and symptoms of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy vary widely, even within the same family. In many affected individuals, the retinal abnormalities never cause any vision problems. Other people with this condition develop abnormal vessels that leak. This  causes chronic inflammation which, over time, can lead to fluid under the retina (exudate). A reduction in the retina's blood supply causes the retina to fold, tear, or separate from the back of the eye (retinal detachment). The resulting retinal damage can lead to vision loss and blindness. Other eye abnormalities are also possible, including eyes that do not look in the same direction (strabismus) and a visible whiteness (leukocoria) in the normally black pupil. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
902559
Concept ID:
C4225316
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Tractional retinal detachment

A type of retinal detachment arising due to a combination of contracting retinal membranes, abnormal vitreoretinal adhesions, and vitreous changes. It is usually seen in the context of diseases that induce a fibrovascular response, e.g. diabetes. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
509678
Concept ID:
C0154828
Pathologic Function
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