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Items: 9

1.

Fraser syndrome 1

Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive malformation disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and abnormalities of the respiratory and urogenital tract (summary by van Haelst et al., 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of Fraser Syndrome Fraser syndrome-2 (FRASRS2) is caused by mutation in the FREM2 gene (608945) on chromosome 13q13, and Fraser syndrome-3 (FRASRS3; 617667) is caused by mutation in the GRIP1 gene (604597) on chromosome 12q14. See Bowen syndrome (211200) for a comparable but probably distinct syndrome of multiple congenital malformations. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1639061
Concept ID:
C4551480
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Craniofacial microsomia 1

Craniofacial microsomia is a term used to describe a spectrum of abnormalities that primarily affect the development of the skull (cranium) and face before birth. Microsomia means abnormal smallness of body structures. Most people with craniofacial microsomia have differences in the size and shape of facial structures between the right and left sides of the face (facial asymmetry). In about two-thirds of cases, both sides of the face have abnormalities, which usually differ from one side to the other. Other individuals with craniofacial microsomia are affected on only one side of the face. The facial characteristics in craniofacial microsomia typically include underdevelopment of one side of the upper or lower jaw (maxillary or mandibular hypoplasia), which can cause dental problems and difficulties with feeding and speech. In cases of severe mandibular hypoplasia, breathing may also be affected.

People with craniofacial microsomia usually have ear abnormalities affecting one or both ears, typically to different degrees. They may have growths of skin (skin tags) in front of the ear (preauricular tags), an underdeveloped or absent external ear (microtia or anotia), or a closed or absent ear canal; these abnormalities may lead to hearing loss. Eye problems are less common in craniofacial microsomia, but some affected individuals have an unusually small eyeball (microphthalmia) or other eye abnormalities that result in vision loss.

Abnormalities in other parts of the body, such as malformed bones of the spine (vertebrae), abnormally shaped kidneys, and heart defects, may also occur in people with craniofacial microsomia.

Many other terms have been used for craniofacial microsomia. These other names generally refer to forms of craniofacial microsomia with specific combinations of signs and symptoms, although sometimes they are used interchangeably. Hemifacial microsomia often refers to craniofacial microsomia with maxillary or mandibular hypoplasia. People with hemifacial microsomia and noncancerous (benign) growths in the eye called epibulbar dermoids may be said to have Goldenhar syndrome or oculoauricular dysplasia. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
501171
Concept ID:
C3495417
Congenital Abnormality
3.

Frontonasal dysplasia - severe microphthalmia - severe facial clefting syndrome

Frontonasal dysplasia is a condition that results from abnormal development of the head and face before birth. People with frontonasal dysplasia have at least two of the following features: widely spaced eyes (ocular hypertelorism); a broad nose; a slit (cleft) in one or both sides of the nose; no nasal tip; a central cleft involving the nose, upper lip, or roof of the mouth (palate); incomplete formation of the front of the skull with skin covering the head where bone should be (anterior cranium bifidum occultum); or a widow's peak hairline.

Other features of frontonasal dysplasia can include additional facial malformations, absence or malformation of the tissue that connects the left and right halves of the brain (the corpus callosum), and intellectual disability.

There are at least three types of frontonasal dysplasia that are distinguished by their genetic causes and their signs and symptoms. In addition to the features previously described, each type of frontonasal dysplasia is associated with other distinctive features. Individuals with frontonasal dysplasia type 1 typically have abnormalities of the nose, a long area between the nose and upper lip (philtrum), and droopy upper eyelids (ptosis). Individuals with frontonasal dysplasia type 2 can have hair loss (alopecia) and an enlarged opening in the two bones that make up much of the top and sides of the skull (enlarged parietal foramina). Males with this form of the condition often have genital abnormalities. Features of frontonasal dysplasia type 3 include eyes that are missing (anophthalmia) or very small (microphthalmia) and low-set ears that are rotated backward. Frontonasal dysplasia type 3 is typically associated with the most severe facial abnormalities, but the severity of the condition varies widely, even among individuals with the same type.

Life expectancy of affected individuals depends on the severity of the malformations and whether or not surgical intervention can improve associated health problems, such as breathing and feeding problems caused by the facial clefts. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
462056
Concept ID:
C3150706
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Treacher Collins syndrome

Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is characterized by bilateral and symmetric downslanting palpebral fissures, malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, and external ear abnormalities. Hypoplasia of the zygomatic bones and mandible can cause significant feeding and respiratory difficulties. About 40%-50% of individuals have conductive hearing loss attributed most commonly to malformation of the ossicles and hypoplasia of the middle ear cavities. Inner ear structures tend to be normal. Other, less common abnormalities include cleft palate and unilateral or bilateral choanal stenosis or atresia. Typically intellect is normal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
66078
Concept ID:
C0242387
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Acrofacial dysostosis Cincinnati type

The Cincinnati type of acrofacial dysostosis is a ribosomopathy characterized by a spectrum of mandibulofacial dysostosis phenotypes, with or without extrafacial skeletal defects (Weaver et al., 2015). In addition, a significant number of neurologic abnormalities have been reported, ranging from mild delays to refractory epilepsy, as well as an increased incidence of congenital heart defects, primarily septal in nature (Smallwood et al., 2023). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
903483
Concept ID:
C4225317
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Sweeney-Cox syndrome

Sweeney-Cox syndrome (SWCOS) is characterized by striking facial dysostosis, including hypertelorism, deficiencies of the eyelids and facial bones, cleft palate/velopharyngeal insufficiency, and low-set cupped ears (Kim et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1625659
Concept ID:
C4540299
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Teebi hypertelorism syndrome 2

Teebi hypertelorism syndrome-2 (TBHS2) is characterized primarily by hypertelorism, prominent forehead, thick and broad eyebrows, and short nose with depressed nasal root and broad nasal tip. Other features include thin upper lip, small chin with horizontal crease, and high or cleft palate. Developmental delay and/or impaired intellectual development have been observed in some patients (Li et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Teebi hypertelorism syndrome, see TBHS1 (145420). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1809276
Concept ID:
C5676911
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Nasopalpebral lipoma-coloboma syndrome

Nasopalpebral lipoma-coloboma syndrome (NPLCS) is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by upper eyelid and nasopalpebral lipomas, colobomas of upper and lower eyelids, telecanthus, and maxillary hypoplasia (summary by Suresh et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
358378
Concept ID:
C1868660
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Upper eyelid coloboma

A short discontinuity of the margin of the upper eyelid. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
350283
Concept ID:
C1863872
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
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