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Finger aplasia

MedGen UID:
1841564
Concept ID:
C5779506
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: Absent fingers; Aplasia of the fingers; Hand has less than 5 fingers; Hand oligodactyly
 
HPO: HP:0009380

Definition

A developmental defect resulting in the presence of fewer than the normal number of fingers (i.e., aplasia of one or more fingers). [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Focal dermal hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
42055
Concept ID:
C0016395
Disease or Syndrome
Focal dermal hypoplasia is a multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. Skin manifestations present at birth include atrophic and hypoplastic areas of skin; cutis aplasia; fat nodules in the dermis manifesting as soft, yellow-pink cutaneous nodules; and pigmentary changes. Verrucoid papillomas of the skin and mucous membranes may appear later. The nails can be ridged, dysplastic, or hypoplastic; hair can be sparse or absent. Limb malformations include oligo-/syndactyly and split hand/foot. Developmental abnormalities of the eye can include anophthalmia/microphthalmia, iris and chorioretinal coloboma, and lacrimal duct abnormalities. Craniofacial findings can include facial asymmetry, notched alae nasi, cleft lip and palate, and pointed chin. Occasional findings include dental anomalies, abdominal wall defects, diaphragmatic hernia, and renal anomalies. Psychomotor development is usually normal; some individuals have cognitive impairment.
Angioosteohypertrophic syndrome
MedGen UID:
9646
Concept ID:
C0022739
Disease or Syndrome
Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a condition that affects the development of blood vessels, soft tissues (such as skin and muscles), and bones. The disorder has three characteristic features: a red birthmark called a port-wine stain, abnormal overgrowth of soft tissues and bones, and vein malformations.\n\nMost people with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome are born with a port-wine stain. This type of birthmark is caused by swelling of small blood vessels near the surface of the skin. Port-wine stains are typically flat and can vary from pale pink to deep maroon in color. In people with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, the port-wine stain usually covers part of one limb. The affected area may become lighter or darker with age. Occasionally, port-wine stains develop small red blisters that break open and bleed easily.\n\nKlippel-Trenaunay syndrome is also associated with overgrowth of bones and soft tissues beginning in infancy. Usually this abnormal growth is limited to one limb, most often one leg. However, overgrowth can also affect the arms or, rarely, the torso. The abnormal growth can cause pain, a feeling of heaviness, and reduced movement in the affected area. If the overgrowth causes one leg to be longer than the other, it can also lead to problems with walking.\n\nMalformations of veins are the third major feature of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. These abnormalities include varicose veins, which are swollen and twisted veins near the surface of the skin that often cause pain. Varicose veins usually occur on the sides of the upper legs and calves. Veins deep in the limbs can also be abnormal in people with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. Malformations of deep veins increase the risk of a type of blood clot called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT). If a DVT travels through the bloodstream and lodges in the lungs, it can cause a life-threatening blood clot known as a pulmonary embolism (PE).\n\nOther complications of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome can include a type of skin infection called cellulitis, swelling caused by a buildup of fluid (lymphedema), and internal bleeding from abnormal blood vessels. Less commonly, this condition is also associated with fusion of certain fingers or toes (syndactyly) or the presence of extra digits (polydactyly).
Roberts-SC phocomelia syndrome
MedGen UID:
95931
Concept ID:
C0392475
Disease or Syndrome
ESCO2 spectrum disorder is characterized by mild-to-severe prenatal growth restriction, limb malformations (which can include bilateral symmetric tetraphocomelia or hypomelia caused by mesomelic shortening), hand anomalies (including oligodactyly, thumb aplasia or hypoplasia, and syndactyly), elbow and knee flexion contractures (involving elbows, wrists, knees, ankles, and feet [talipes equinovarus]), and craniofacial abnormalities (which can include bilateral cleft lip and/or cleft palate, micrognathia, widely spaced eyes, exophthalmos, downslanted palpebral fissures, malar flattening, and underdeveloped ala nasi), ear malformation, and corneal opacities. Intellectual disability (ranging from mild to severe) is common. Early mortality is common among severely affected pregnancies and newborns; mildly affected individuals may survive to adulthood.
Microphthalmia with limb anomalies
MedGen UID:
154638
Concept ID:
C0599973
Disease or Syndrome
Ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome is a condition that results in malformations of the eyes, hands, and feet. The features of this condition are present from birth. The eyes are often absent or severely underdeveloped (anophthalmia), or they may be abnormally small (microphthalmia). Usually both eyes are similarly affected in this condition, but if only one eye is small or missing, the other eye may have a defect such as a gap or split in its structures (coloboma).\n\nThe most common hand and foot malformation seen in ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome is missing fingers or toes (oligodactyly). Other frequent malformations include fingers or toes that are fused together (syndactyly) or extra fingers or toes (polydactyly). These skeletal malformations are often described as acromelic, meaning that they occur in the bones that are away from the center of the body. Additional skeletal abnormalities involving the long bones of the arms and legs or the spinal bones (vertebrae) can also occur. Affected individuals may have distinctive facial features, an opening in the lip (cleft lip) with or without an opening in the roof of the mouth (cleft palate), or intellectual disability.
XK aprosencephaly
MedGen UID:
167087
Concept ID:
C0795952
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndromic type of cerebral malformation with characteristics of aprosencephaly (absence of telencephalon and diencephalon), oculo-facial anomalies (such as ocular hypotelorism or cyclopia, malformation/absence of nasal structures, cleft lip), preaxial limb defects (such as hypoplastic hands, absent halluces) and various other anomalies including ambiguous genitalia, imperforate anus, and vertebral anomalies.
Orofaciodigital syndrome X
MedGen UID:
322280
Concept ID:
C1833796
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of facial (telecanthus, flat nasal bridge, retrognathia), oral (cleft palate, vestibular frenula) and digital (oligodactyly, preaxial polydactyly) features, associated with remarkable radial shortening, fibular agenesis and coalescence of tarsal bones. The syndrome has been described in one 10-month-old girl. No new cases have been described since 1993.
Ulnar agenesis and endocardial fibroelastosis
MedGen UID:
336387
Concept ID:
C1848649
Disease or Syndrome
Schinzel phocomelia syndrome
MedGen UID:
336388
Concept ID:
C1848651
Disease or Syndrome
The Al-Awadi/Raas-Rothschild/Schinzel phocomelia syndrome (AARRS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe malformations of upper and lower limbs with severely hypoplastic pelvis and abnormal genitalia. The disorder is believed to represent a defect of dorsoventral patterning and outgrowth of limbs (summary by Kantaputra et al., 2010).
Fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia, and oligosyndactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
340887
Concept ID:
C1855499
Disease or Syndrome
FATCO syndrome comprises fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia, and oligosyndactyly (Courtens et al., 2005). See also ectrodactyly (split-hand/foot malformation) associated with fibular hypoplasia/aplasia (113310).
Fuhrmann syndrome
MedGen UID:
346429
Concept ID:
C1856728
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has main characteristics of bowing of the femora, aplasia or hypoplasia of the fibulae and poly, oligo and syndactyly. It has been reported in 11 patients. Most of the patients also had a hypoplastic pelvis and hypoplasia of the fingers and fingernails. Some had congenital dislocation of the hip, absence or fusion of tarsal bones, absence of various metatarsals and hypoplasia and aplasia of the toes. The syndrome is caused by a partial loss of WNT7A function (gene mapped to 3p25).
Weyers ulnar ray/oligodactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
356030
Concept ID:
C1865566
Disease or Syndrome
Robin sequence-oligodactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
358176
Concept ID:
C1868309
Disease or Syndrome
Robin sequence-oligodactyly syndrome is a rare, genetic, developmental defect during embryogenesis syndrome characterized by Robin sequence (i.e. severe micrognathia, retroglossia and U-shaped cleft of the posterior palate) associated with pre- and postaxial oligodactyly. Facial features can include a narrow face and narrow lower dental arch. Clinodactyly, absent phalanx, metacarpal fusions, and hypoplastic carpals have also been reported. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1986.
Split hand-foot malformation 6
MedGen UID:
440845
Concept ID:
C2749665
Disease or Syndrome
Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM) is a limb malformation involving the central rays of the autopod and presenting with syndactyly, median clefts of the hands and feet, and aplasia and/or hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals, and metatarsals. Some patients with SHFM have been found to have mental retardation, ectodermal and craniofacial findings, and orofacial clefting (Elliott and Evans, 2006). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of split-hand/foot malformations, see SHFM1 (183600).
Split hand-foot malformation 1
MedGen UID:
419314
Concept ID:
C2931019
Congenital Abnormality
Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a limb malformation involving the central rays of the autopod and presenting with syndactyly, median clefts of the hands and feet, and aplasia and/or hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals, and metatarsals. Some patients with SHFM1 have been found to have mental retardation, ectodermal and craniofacial findings, orofacial clefting (Elliott and Evans, 2006), and neurosensory hearing loss (Tackels-Horne et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Split-Hand/Foot Malformation Additional SHFM loci include SHFM2 (313350) on chromosome Xq26; SHFM3 (246560), caused by duplication of chromosome 10q24; SHFM4 (605289), caused by mutation in the TP63 gene (603273) on chromosome 3q28; SHFM5 (606708) on chromosome 2q31; and SHFM6 (225300), caused by mutation in the WNT10B gene (601906) on chromosome 12q13. Also see SHFM1D (220600) for a form of SHFM1 with deafness that may be caused by homozygous mutation in the DLX5 gene (600028). Associations Pending Confirmation For discussion of a possible association between split-hand/foot malformation and variation in the EPS15L1 gene, see 616826.0001.
Acrorenal syndrome
MedGen UID:
501193
Concept ID:
C3495490
Disease or Syndrome
Acrorenal syndrome comprises a wide spectrum of congenital malformation disorders with characteristics of the co-occurrence of distal limb anomalies (usually bilateral cleft feet and/or hands) and renal defects (for example unilateral or bilateral agenesis), that can be associated with a variety of other anomalies such as those of genitourinary tract, abdominal well defects, intestinal atresia and lung malformations. Familial cases have been reported in which an autosomal recessive inheritance was suspected.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 11
MedGen UID:
766956
Concept ID:
C3554042
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1645760
Concept ID:
C4551851
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.

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Cetin Gedik K, Lamot L, Romano M, Demirkaya E, Piskin D, Torreggiani S, Adang LA, Armangue T, Barchus K, Cordova DR, Crow YJ, Dale RC, Durrant KL, Eleftheriou D, Fazzi EM, Gattorno M, Gavazzi F, Hanson EP, Lee-Kirsch MA, Montealegre Sanchez GA, Neven B, Orcesi S, Ozen S, Poli MC, Schumacher E, Tonduti D, Uss K, Aletaha D, Feldman BM, Vanderver A, Brogan PA, Goldbach-Mansky R
Ann Rheum Dis 2022 May;81(5):601-613. Epub 2022 Jan 27 doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2021-221814. PMID: 35086813Free PMC Article
Prasasya R, Grotheer KV, Siracusa LD, Bartolomei MS
Hum Mol Genet 2020 Sep 30;29(R1):R107-R116. doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddaa133. PMID: 32592473Free PMC Article
Kelenjian S, Mattjie RA, Franz R, Biedermann T, Brockow K
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges 2019 Apr;17(4):393-397. Epub 2019 Mar 13 doi: 10.1111/ddg.13808. PMID: 30865379

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