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Sparse lateral eyebrow

MedGen UID:
387768
Concept ID:
C1857206
Finding
Synonyms: Laterally sparse eyebrow; Laterally sparse eyebrows; Sparse eyebrows laterally; Sparse lateral eyebrows; Thinning of lateral eyebrows
 
HPO: HP:0005338

Definition

Decreased density/number and/or decreased diameter of lateral eyebrow hairs. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVSparse lateral eyebrow

Conditions with this feature

Dubowitz syndrome
MedGen UID:
59797
Concept ID:
C0175691
Disease or Syndrome
Dubowitz syndrome (DS) is a rare multiple congenital syndrome characterized primarly by growth retardation, microcephaly, distinctive facial dysmorphism, cutaneous eczema, a mild to severe intellectual deficit and genital abnormalities.
Aicardi syndrome
MedGen UID:
61236
Concept ID:
C0175713
Disease or Syndrome
Aicardi syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects primarily females. Initially it was characterized by a typical triad of agenesis of the corpus callosum, central chorioretinal lacunae, and infantile spasms. As more affected individuals have been ascertained, it has become clear that not all affected girls have all three features of the classic triad and that other neurologic and systemic defects are common, including other brain malformations, optic nerve abnormalities, other seizure types, intellectual disability of varying severity, and scoliosis.
Rokitansky sequence
MedGen UID:
140915
Concept ID:
C0431648
Congenital Abnormality
Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome (MRKH) is characterized by uterovaginal atresia in an otherwise phenotypically normal female with a normal 46,XX karyotype. Anomalies of the genital tract range from upper vaginal atresia to total mullerian agenesis with urinary tract abnormalities. It has an incidence of approximately 1 in 5,000 newborn girls (Cheroki et al., 2006). The abnormality of sexual development in MRKH syndrome is the same as that in the MURCS association (601076), in which cervicothoracic somite anomalies, unilateral renal agenesis, and conductive deafness are also seen. Mullerian aplasia and hyperandrogenism (158330) is caused by mutation in the WNT4 gene (603490). Familial cases of unilateral or bilateral renal agenesis in combination with mullerian anomalies have also been reported (see urogenital adysplasia, 191830).
Trichorhinophalangeal dysplasia type I
MedGen UID:
140929
Concept ID:
C0432233
Disease or Syndrome
Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) comprises TRPS I (caused by a heterozygous pathogenic variant in TRPS1) and TRPS II (caused by contiguous gene deletion of TRPS1, RAD21, and EXT1). Both types of TRPS are characterized by distinctive facial features; ectodermal features (fine, sparse, depigmented, and slow growing hair; dystrophic nails; and small breasts); and skeletal findings (short stature; short feet; brachydactyly with ulnar or radial deviation of the fingers; and early, marked hip dysplasia). TRPS II is characterized by multiple osteochondromas (typically first observed clinically on the scapulae and around the elbows and knees between ages 1 month and 6 years) and an increased risk of mild-to-moderate intellectual disability.
Renpenning syndrome
MedGen UID:
208670
Concept ID:
C0796135
Disease or Syndrome
Renpenning syndrome is an X-linked mental retardation syndrome with clinically recognizable features. Affected individuals have microcephaly, short stature, small testes, and dysmorphic facies, including tall narrow face, upslanting palpebral fissures, abnormal nasal configuration, cupped ears, and short philtrum. The nose may appear long or bulbous, with overhanging columella. Less consistent manifestations include ocular colobomas, cardiac malformations, cleft palate, and anal anomalies. Stevenson et al. (2005) proposed that the various X-linked mental retardation syndromes due to PQBP1 mutations be combined under the name of Renpenning syndrome.
Potocki-Shaffer syndrome
MedGen UID:
318657
Concept ID:
C1832588
Disease or Syndrome
Potocki-Shaffer syndrome is a rare contiguous gene deletion syndrome due to haploinsufficiency of the 11p12-p11.2 region and is characterized by craniofacial abnormalities, developmental delay, intellectual disability, multiple exostoses (168500), and biparietal foramina (609597) (summary by Swarr et al., 2010).
Ichthyosis-cheek-eyebrow syndrome
MedGen UID:
326697
Concept ID:
C1840283
Disease or Syndrome
Ichthyosis-cheek-eyebrow syndrome is characterized by ichthyosis, prominent full cheeks and sparse lateral eyebrows. It has been described in several individuals from four generations of one family. Transmission is autosomal dominant.
CHIME syndrome
MedGen UID:
341214
Concept ID:
C1848392
Disease or Syndrome
CHIME syndrome, also known as Zunich neuroectodermal syndrome, is an extremely rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder clinically characterized by colobomas, congenital heart defects, migratory ichthyosiform dermatosis, mental retardation, and ear anomalies (CHIME). Other clinical features include distinctive facial features, abnormal growth, genitourinary abnormalities, seizures, and feeding difficulties (summary by Ng et al., 2012). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Pili torti-developmental delay-neurological abnormalities syndrome
MedGen UID:
342358
Concept ID:
C1849811
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormal hair, joint laxity, and developmental delay (HJDD) is characterized by normal hair at birth that gradually becomes sparse, twisted, brittle, and easily broken, with pili torti and trichorrhexis nodosa observed on light microscopy. Other features include increased joint mobility and cognitive delay (summary by Sharma et al., 2019).
Poikiloderma with neutropenia
MedGen UID:
388129
Concept ID:
C1858723
Disease or Syndrome
Poikiloderma with neutropenia (PN) is characterized by an inflammatory eczematous rash (ages 6-12 months) followed by post-inflammatory poikiloderma (age >2 years) and chronic noncyclic neutropenia typically associated with recurrent sinopulmonary infections in the first two years of life and (often) bronchiectasis. There is increased risk for myelodysplastic syndrome and, rarely, acute myelogenous leukemia. Other ectodermal findings include nail dystrophy and palmar/plantar hyperkeratosis. Most affected individuals also have reactive airway disease and some have short stature, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, midfacial retrusion, calcinosis cutis, and non-healing skin ulcers.
Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type III
MedGen UID:
349899
Concept ID:
C1860823
Disease or Syndrome
Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is characterized by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. Craniofacial features include sparse, slowly growing scalp hair, laterally sparse eyebrows, a bulbous tip of the nose, protruding ears, long flat philtrum, and thin upper vermillion border. The most typical radiographic findings in TRPS are cone-shaped epiphyses, predominantly at the middle phalanges. Hip malformations such as coxa plana, coxa magna, or coxa vara are present in over 70% of patients. In older patients, the hip abnormalities resemble degenerative arthrosis. TRPS3 differs from TRPS1 by the presence of severe brachydactyly, due to short metacarpals, and severe short stature (summary by Ludecke et al., 2001).
Ulnar-mammary syndrome
MedGen UID:
357886
Concept ID:
C1866994
Disease or Syndrome
Ulnar-mammary syndrome (UMS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by posterior limb deficiencies or duplications, apocrine/mammary gland hypoplasia and/or dysfunction, abnormal dentition, delayed puberty in males, and genital anomalies (Bamshad et al., 1996).
Craniofacial dysplasia - osteopenia syndrome
MedGen UID:
370148
Concept ID:
C1970027
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic developmental defect during embryogenesis disorder with characteristics of craniofacial dysmorphism (including brachycephaly, prominent forehead, sparse lateral eyebrows, severe hypertelorism, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, protruding ears, broad nasal bridge, pointed nasal tip, flat philtrum, anteverted nostrils, large mouth, thin upper vermilion border, highly arched palate and mild micrognathia) associated with osteopenia leading to repeated long bone fractures, severe myopia, mild to moderate sensorineural or mixed hearing loss, enamel hypoplasia, sloping shoulders and mild intellectual disability. There is evidence the disease can be caused by homozygous mutation in the IRX5 gene on chromosome 16q11.2.
Kabuki syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
477126
Concept ID:
C3275495
Disease or Syndrome
Kabuki syndrome (KS) is characterized by typical facial features (long palpebral fissures with eversion of the lateral third of the lower eyelid; arched and broad eyebrows; short columella with depressed nasal tip; large, prominent, or cupped ears), minor skeletal anomalies, persistence of fetal fingertip pads, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, and postnatal growth deficiency. Other findings may include: congenital heart defects, genitourinary anomalies, cleft lip and/or palate, gastrointestinal anomalies including anal atresia, ptosis and strabismus, and widely spaced teeth and hypodontia. Functional differences can include: increased susceptibility to infections and autoimmune disorders, seizures, endocrinologic abnormalities (including isolated premature thelarche in females), feeding problems, and hearing loss.
Rafiq syndrome
MedGen UID:
481757
Concept ID:
C3280127
Disease or Syndrome
Rafiq syndrome (RAFQS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by variably impaired intellectual and motor development, a characteristic facial dysmorphism, truncal obesity, and hypotonia. The facial dysmorphism comprises prominent eyebrows with lateral thinning, downward-slanting palpebral fissures, bulbous tip of the nose, large ears, and a thin upper lip. Behavioral problems, including overeating, verbal and physical aggression, have been reported in some cases. Serum transferrin isoelectric focusing shows a type 2 pattern (summary by Balasubramanian et al., 2019).
Familial cutaneous telangiectasia and oropharyngeal predisposition cancer syndrome
MedGen UID:
482833
Concept ID:
C3281203
Neoplastic Process
Patients with this syndrome develop cutaneous telangiectases in infancy with patchy alopecia over areas of affected skin, thinning of the lateral eyebrows, and mild dental and nail anomalies. Affected individuals are at increased risk of developing oropharyngeal cancer, and other malignancies have been reported as well (Tanaka et al., 2012).
Ectodermal dysplasia 11B, hypohidrotic/hair/tooth type, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
761671
Concept ID:
C3539920
Disease or Syndrome
Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is characterized by hypotrichosis (sparseness of scalp and body hair), hypohidrosis (reduced ability to sweat), and hypodontia (congenital absence of teeth). The cardinal features of classic HED become obvious during childhood. The scalp hair is thin, lightly pigmented, and slow growing. Sweating, although present, is greatly deficient, leading to episodes of hyperthermia until the affected individual or family acquires experience with environmental modifications to control temperature. Only a few abnormally formed teeth erupt, at a later-than-average age. Physical growth and psychomotor development are otherwise within normal limits. Mild HED is characterized by mild manifestations of any or all the characteristic features.
Au-Kline syndrome
MedGen UID:
900671
Concept ID:
C4225274
Disease or Syndrome
Au-Kline syndrome is characterized by developmental delay and hypotonia with moderate-to-severe intellectual disability, and typical facial features that include long palpebral fissures, ptosis, shallow orbits, large and deeply grooved tongue, broad nose with a wide nasal bridge, and downturned mouth. There is frequently variable autonomic dysfunction (gastrointestinal dysmotility, high pain threshold, heat intolerance, recurrent fevers, abnormal sweating). Congenital heart disease, hydronephrosis, palate abnormalities, and oligodontia are also reported in the majority of affected individuals. Additional complications can include craniosynostosis, feeding difficulty, vision issues, osteopenia, and other skeletal anomalies.
Ectodermal dysplasia 12, hypohidrotic/hair/tooth/nail type
MedGen UID:
934583
Concept ID:
C4310616
Disease or Syndrome
Some ectodermal dysplasias are here classified as congenital disorders characterized by abnormal development in 2 or more ectodermal structures (hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands) without other systemic findings. Hypohidrotic, or anhidrotic, ectodermal dysplasia (HED/EDA) is characterized by a triad of signs comprising sparse hair (hypotrichosis), abnormal or missing teeth (anodontia or hypodontia), and inability to sweat (anhidrosis or hypohidrosis). Typical clinical manifestations also include dryness of the skin, eyes, airways, and mucous membranes presumably due to the defective development of several exocrine glands. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia can be associated with dysmorphic features (forehead bumps, rings under the eyes, everted nose, and prominent lips) and occasionally with absent nipples (summary by Cluzeau et al., 2011).
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair 2
MedGen UID:
1376945
Concept ID:
C4479577
Disease or Syndrome
An inherited condition caused by autosomal dominant mutation(s) in the PPP1CB gene, encoding serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1-beta catalytic subunit. The condition is characterized by facial features similar to those seen in Noonan syndrome but may also include short stature, cognitive deficits, relative macrocephaly, small posterior fossa resulting in Chiari I malformation, hypernasal voice, cardiac defects, and ectodermal abnormalities, which typically presents as slow-growing, sparse, and/or unruly hair.
Skraban-Deardorff syndrome
MedGen UID:
1627555
Concept ID:
C4539927
Disease or Syndrome
WDR26-related intellectual disability (ID) is characterized by developmental delay / intellectual disability, characteristic facial features, hypotonia, epilepsy, and infant feeding difficulties. To date 15 individuals, ages 24 months to 34 years, have been reported. Developmental delay is present in all individuals and ranges from mild to severe. All individuals have delayed speech. Although some begin to develop speech in the second year, others have remained nonverbal. Seizures, present in all affected individuals reported to date, can be febrile or non-febrile (tonic-clonic, absence, rolandic seizures); most seizures are self limited or respond well to standard treatment. Affected individuals are generally described as happy and socially engaging; several have stereotypies / autistic features (repetitive or rocking behavior, abnormal hand movements or posturing, and at times self-stimulation).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 51
MedGen UID:
1625009
Concept ID:
C4540474
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Osteogenesis imperfecta, type 20
MedGen UID:
1684751
Concept ID:
C5231439
Disease or Syndrome
Osteogenesis imperfecta type XX (OI20) is a progressive deforming bone disorder characterized by osteopenia, skeletal deformity, and both healed and new fractures on radiography. Several patients have died due to respiratory failure (Moosa et al., 2019).
Focal facial dermal dysplasia type I
MedGen UID:
1718224
Concept ID:
C5235196
Disease or Syndrome
The focal dermal dysplasias (FFDDs) are a group of related developmental defects characterized by bitemporal or preauricular skin lesions resembling aplasia cutis congenita. Cervantes-Barragan et al. (2011) proposed a classification of FFDD in which there are 4 subtypes. FFDD1 (Brauer syndrome) is characterized by temporal skin depressions that resemble 'forceps marks.' Other facial anomalies, comprising sparse lateral eyebrows, distichiasis, and a flattened nasal tip, are usually mild. Inheritance is autosomal dominant. FFFD2 (Brauer-Setleis syndrome; 614973) is characterized by bitemporal skin lesions with variable facial findings, including thin and puckered periorbital skin, distichiasis and/or absent eyelashes, upslanting palpebral fissures, a flat nasal bridge with a broad nasal tip, large lips, and redundant facial skin. Inheritance is autosomal dominant. FFDD3 (Setleis syndrome; 227260) is characterized by the same facial features as FFDD2, but the inheritance is autosomal recessive. FFDD4 (614974) is characterized by isolated, preauricular skin lesions with autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance (summary by Slavotinek et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Focal Facial Dermal Dysplasia FFDD3 (227260) is caused by mutation in the TWIST2 gene (607556) on chromosome 2q37. FFDD4 (614974) is caused by mutation in the CYP26C1 gene on chromosome 10q23.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and cerebellar atrophy, with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1710849
Concept ID:
C5394372
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and cerebellar atrophy, with or without seizures (NEDHCAS) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development, delayed motor skills, and poor or absent speech. Most patients develop early-onset seizures and demonstrate cerebellar ataxia or dysmetria associated with progressive cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis (summary by Nguyen et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic facies, sleep disturbance, and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1777442
Concept ID:
C5436821
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic facies, sleep disturbance, and brain abnormalities (NEDFASB) is a syndromic disorder with multisystemic involvement. Affected individuals have severe global developmental delay with severely impaired intellectual development, poor or absent language, behavioral abnormalities, seizures, and sleep disturbances. Craniofacial dysmorphisms, while variable, include round face, prognathism, depressed nasal bridge, and cleft or high-arched palate. Brain imaging shows dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and progressive cerebellar atrophy. Additional features may include genitourinary tract anomalies, hearing loss, and mild distal skeletal defects (summary by Humbert et al., 2020).
Zaki syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794247
Concept ID:
C5562037
Disease or Syndrome
Zaki syndrome (ZKS) is characterized by developmental delay, progressive microcephaly, and short stature, as well as dysmorphic features including sparse scalp hair, cupped ears, wide nose and mouth, short philtrum, and high-arched palate. Other variable features have been observed, including ocular, skeletal, cardiac, and renal anomalies (Chai et al., 2021).
Developmental delay with variable neurologic and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794270
Concept ID:
C5562060
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay with variable neurologic and brain abnormalities (DENBA) is characterized most often by motor and speech delay apparent from early childhood. Most patients have delayed walking and variably impaired intellectual development. Additional neurologic features may include seizures, spasticity, and ocular abnormalities. Brain imaging often shows thin corpus callosum and may show white matter atrophy, myelination abnormalities, or enlarged ventricles. The severity of the disorder and clinical manifestations are highly variable (summary by Malhotra et al., 2021).
Dworschak-Punetha neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1800957
Concept ID:
C5677017
Disease or Syndrome
Dworschak-Punetha neurodevelopmental syndrome (DWOPNED) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized mainly by global developmental delay and mildly impaired intellectual development (IQ range 77 to 85), often with behavioral abnormalities, including autism spectrum disorder and hyperactivity. Some affected individuals may have only speech delay or behavioral manifestations. More variable additional features include optic disc hypoplasia, ptosis, hypo- or hyperpigmented skin lesions, nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, and brain imaging abnormalities of the ventricles or corpus callosum. Of note, not all patients exhibit all features, and there is significant inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (Dworschak et al., 2021).
Chilton-Okur-Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1803276
Concept ID:
C5677022
Disease or Syndrome
Chilton-Okur-Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome (CHOCNS) is characterized mainly by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development and occasional speech delay. Most patients have behavioral abnormalities, including autism spectrum disorder, ADHD, and aggression. About half of patients have dysmorphic facial features, and about half have nonspecific brain abnormalities, including thin corpus callosum. Rare involvement of other organ systems may be present. At least 1 child with normal development at age 2.5 years has been reported (Chilton et al., 2020).
Chromosome Xq13 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
1809227
Concept ID:
C5677057
Disease or Syndrome
Tessadori-Van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1824083
Concept ID:
C5774310
Disease or Syndrome
Tessadori-Bicknell-van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome-3 (TEBIVANED3) is characterized by global developmental delay with poor overall growth, impaired intellectual development, and speech difficulties. More variable features include hypotonia, microcephaly, and dysmorphic facies. The severity and manifestations of the disorder are highly variable (Tessadori et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Tessadori-Bicknell-van Haaften neurodevelopmental disorder, see TEBIVANED1 (619758).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Shangguan H, Wang J, Lin J, Huang X, Zeng Y, Chen R
Eur J Pediatr 2024 Mar;183(3):1403-1414. Epub 2024 Jan 3 doi: 10.1007/s00431-023-05385-3. PMID: 38170291

Recent clinical studies

Diagnosis

Shangguan H, Wang J, Lin J, Huang X, Zeng Y, Chen R
Eur J Pediatr 2024 Mar;183(3):1403-1414. Epub 2024 Jan 3 doi: 10.1007/s00431-023-05385-3. PMID: 38170291

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