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Keratosis pilaris

MedGen UID:
82664
Concept ID:
C0263383
Disease or Syndrome
Synonym: Hyperkeratosis pilaris
SNOMED CT: KP - Keratosis pilaris (5132005); Keratosis pilaris (5132005)
 
HPO: HP:0032152
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0021036

Definition

An anomaly of the hair follicles of the skin that typically presents as small, rough, brown folliculocentric papules distributed over characteristic areas of the skin, particularly the outer-upper arms and thighs. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVKeratosis pilaris
Follow this link to review classifications for Keratosis pilaris in Orphanet.

Conditions with this feature

Pityriasis rubra pilaris
MedGen UID:
45939
Concept ID:
C0032027
Disease or Syndrome
Pityriasis rubra pilaris is an uncommon skin disorder characterized by the appearance of keratotic follicular papules, well-demarcated salmon-colored erythematous plaques covered with fine powdery scales interspersed with distinct islands of uninvolved skin, and palmoplantar keratoderma. Most cases are sporadic, although up to 6.5% of PRP-affected individuals report a positive family history. The rare familial cases show autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable expression: the disorder is usually present at birth or appears during the first years of life and is characterized by prominent follicular hyperkeratosis, diffuse palmoplantar keratoderma, and erythema, with only a modest response to treatment (summary by Fuchs-Telem et al., 2012).
Ichthyosis vulgaris
MedGen UID:
38217
Concept ID:
C0079584
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic characteristics of ichthyosis vulgaris include palmar hyperlinearity, keratosis pilaris, and a fine scale that is most prominent over the lower abdomen, arms, and legs. Marked presentation includes prominent scaling, whereas mild presentation consists of palmar hyperlinearity, keratosis pilaris, and, in some cases, fine scaling (summary by Smith et al., 2006).
Keratosis pilaris atrophicans
MedGen UID:
75520
Concept ID:
C0263428
Disease or Syndrome
Keratosis pilaris atrophicans (KPA) represents a group of rare genodermatoses characterized by perifollicular keratosis and inflammation that progresses to atrophy and scarring of the facial skin. Keratosis pilaris of extensor surfaces of limbs is a common associated finding. Affected individuals may present with features that overlap between 3 subtypes, keratosis pilaris atrophicans faciei (KPAF), keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD), and atrophoderma vermiculata (AVA; see 209700) (summary by Klar et al., 2015).
Follicular atrophoderma and basal cell epitheliomata
MedGen UID:
87539
Concept ID:
C0346104
Neoplastic Process
Bazex-Dupre-Christol syndrome (BDCS) is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by a triad of congenital hypotrichosis, follicular atrophoderma affecting the dorsa of the hands and feet, the face, and extensor surfaces of the elbows or knees, and the development of basal cell neoplasms, including basal cell nevi and basal cell carcinomas from the second decade onward (Yung and Newton-Bishop, 2005). Rombo syndrome (180730) has similar features, but shows autosomal dominant inheritance.
Beaded hair
MedGen UID:
108185
Concept ID:
C0546966
Congenital Abnormality
Individuals with monilethrix have normal hair at birth, but within the first few months of life develop fragile, brittle hair that tends to fracture and produce varying degrees of dystrophic alopecia. In the mildest forms, only the occipital regions of the scalp are involved; however, in severe forms the eyebrows, eyelashes, and secondary sexual hair may also be involved. Follicular hyperkeratosis with predilection for the scalp, nape of neck, and extensor surfaces of the upper arm and thighs is also a characteristic finding in these patients. Light microscopic examination is diagnostic and reveals elliptical nodes of normal thickness and intermittent constrictions (internodes) at which the hair easily breaks. There may be spontaneous improvement with time, especially during puberty and pregnancy, but the condition never resolves completely (summary by Zlotogorski et al., 2006). An autosomal recessive form of monilethrix-like congenital hypotrichosis (see 607903) is caused by mutation in the DSG4 gene (607892). The clinical picture of autosomal recessive monilethrix is more severe than the dominant form, with more extensive alopecia of the scalp, body, and limbs, and a papular rash involving the extremities and periumbilical region (Zlotogorski et al., 2006). The term monilethrix derives from the Latin word for necklace and the Greek for hair (Schweizer, 2006).
Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
208666
Concept ID:
C0796093
Disease or Syndrome
Odontoonychodermal dysplasia (OODD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dry hair, severe hypodontia, smooth tongue with marked reduction of fungiform and filiform papillae, onychodysplasia, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, hypo- and hyperhidrosis of the skin, and atrophic patches on the face (summary by Adaimy et al., 2007; Yu et al., 2019).
Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia
MedGen UID:
220887
Concept ID:
C1274795
Congenital Abnormality
Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD) is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by onset in infancy of a panepithelial defect involving the oral, nasal, conjunctival, vaginal, cervical, perineal, urethral, and bladder mucosa. Patients develop cataracts, blindness, nonscarring alopecia, perineal psoriasiform lesions, and follicular keratoses (Witkop et al., 1982). Although 1 family was reported to have progressive severe interstitial lung disease (Witkop et al., 1979), this feature has not been reported in other families and is not considered a criterion for diagnosis. However, the clinical triad of nonscarring alopecia, well-demarcated fiery red mucosa, and psoriasiform perineal involvement has been consistently observed (review by Boralevi et al., 2005).
Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome
MedGen UID:
266149
Concept ID:
C1275081
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by cardiac abnormalities (pulmonic stenosis and other valve dysplasias, septal defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rhythm disturbances), distinctive craniofacial appearance, and cutaneous abnormalities (including xerosis, hyperkeratosis, ichthyosis, keratosis pilaris, ulerythema ophryogenes, eczema, pigmented moles, hemangiomas, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis). The hair is typically sparse, curly, fine or thick, woolly or brittle; eyelashes and eyebrows may be absent or sparse. Nails may be dystrophic or fast growing. Some form of neurologic and/or cognitive delay (ranging from mild to severe) is seen in all affected individuals. Neoplasia, mostly acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been reported in some individuals.
Woolly hair-skin fragility syndrome
MedGen UID:
375148
Concept ID:
C1843292
Disease or Syndrome
Woolly hair-skin fragility syndrome (WHSF) is characterized by woolly hair texture and slow hair growth, as well as superficial skin fragility which is present at birth or appears in the neonatal period and then resolves or persists only as minor palmoplantar skin peeling. The disorder appears to predominantly affect hair, and to a lesser extent skin (Jackson et al., 2023).
Pili torti-developmental delay-neurological abnormalities syndrome
MedGen UID:
342358
Concept ID:
C1849811
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormal hair, joint laxity, and developmental delay (HJDD) is characterized by normal hair at birth that gradually becomes sparse, twisted, brittle, and easily broken, with pili torti and trichorrhexis nodosa observed on light microscopy. Other features include increased joint mobility and cognitive delay (summary by Sharma et al., 2019).
Noonan syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
339908
Concept ID:
C1853120
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Seborrhea-like dermatitis with psoriasiform elements
MedGen UID:
342832
Concept ID:
C1853258
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic epidermal disorder with characteristics of a chronic diffuse fine scaly erythematous rash on the face (predominantly the chin, nasolabial folds, eyebrows) around the earlobes and over the scalp, associated with hyperkeratosis over elbows, knees, palms, soles and metacarpophalangeal joints, in the absence of associated rheumatological or neurological disorders. Cold weather, emotional stress and strenuous physical activity may exacerbate symptoms. There is evidence the disease is caused by mutation in the ZNF750 gene.
Autosomal recessive palmoplantar keratoderma and congenital alopecia
MedGen UID:
347851
Concept ID:
C1859316
Disease or Syndrome
Palmoplantar keratoderma and congenital alopecia-2 (PPKCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital alopecia and progressive hyperkeratosis resulting in sclerodactyly, severe contractures and tapering of the digits, and pseudoainhum formation. Nail changes occur in some patients (Castori et al., 2010). Also see PPKCA1 (104100), a less severe, autosomal dominant disorder.
Autosomal dominant wooly hair
MedGen UID:
348571
Concept ID:
C1860238
Finding
Woolly hair (WH) refers to a group of hair shaft disorders that are characterized by fine and tightly curled hair. Compared to normal curly hair that is observed in some populations, WH grows slowly and stops growing after a few inches. Under light microscopy, WH shows some structural anomalies, including trichorrhexis nodosa and tapered ends. WH can appear as part of several syndromes, such as Naxos disease (601214) and cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (115150) (summary by Petukhova et al., 2009). See 278150 for a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive woolly hair.
Dermatitis, atopic
MedGen UID:
350353
Concept ID:
C1864155
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
370589
Concept ID:
C1969057
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
412573
Concept ID:
C2748527
Disease or Syndrome
Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an uncommon genodermatosis characterized by follicular hyperkeratosis, progressive cicatricial alopecia, and photophobia. Most reported cases show X-linked inheritance (KFSDX; 308800) (Castori et al., 2009).
Noonan syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
413028
Concept ID:
C2750732
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Corneal intraepithelial dyskeratosis-palmoplantar hyperkeratosis-laryngeal dyskeratosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
815206
Concept ID:
C3808876
Neoplastic Process
Multiple self-healing palmoplantar carcinoma (MSPC) is characterized by recurrent keratoacanthomas in palmoplantar skin as well as in conjunctival and corneal epithelia. In addition, patients experience a high susceptibility to malignant squamous cell carcinoma (summary by Zhong et al., 2016).
Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
815336
Concept ID:
C3809006
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by cardiac abnormalities (pulmonic stenosis and other valve dysplasias, septal defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rhythm disturbances), distinctive craniofacial appearance, and cutaneous abnormalities (including xerosis, hyperkeratosis, ichthyosis, keratosis pilaris, ulerythema ophryogenes, eczema, pigmented moles, hemangiomas, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis). The hair is typically sparse, curly, fine or thick, woolly or brittle; eyelashes and eyebrows may be absent or sparse. Nails may be dystrophic or fast growing. Some form of neurologic and/or cognitive delay (ranging from mild to severe) is seen in all affected individuals. Neoplasia, mostly acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been reported in some individuals.
Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
815337
Concept ID:
C3809007
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by cardiac abnormalities (pulmonic stenosis and other valve dysplasias, septal defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rhythm disturbances), distinctive craniofacial appearance, and cutaneous abnormalities (including xerosis, hyperkeratosis, ichthyosis, keratosis pilaris, ulerythema ophryogenes, eczema, pigmented moles, hemangiomas, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis). The hair is typically sparse, curly, fine or thick, woolly or brittle; eyelashes and eyebrows may be absent or sparse. Nails may be dystrophic or fast growing. Some form of neurologic and/or cognitive delay (ranging from mild to severe) is seen in all affected individuals. Neoplasia, mostly acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been reported in some individuals.
Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans, X-linked
MedGen UID:
854384
Concept ID:
C3887525
Congenital Abnormality
Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans is an uncommon genodermatosis chiefly characterized by widespread keratosis pilaris, progressive cicatricial alopecia of the scalp, eyebrows, and eyelashes, and an excess of affected males. Photophobia, blepharitis/conjunctivitis, and corneal dystrophy are characteristic ancillary findings. It is most often inherited as an X-linked trait (summary by Castori et al., 2009). Autosomal dominant inheritance has also been reported (KFSD; 612843). The term 'cum ophiasi' means 'with ophiasis,' i.e., baldness in 1 or more winding streaks about the head, which comes from the Greek for snake. Decalvans refers to the loss of hair.
Noonan syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
902892
Concept ID:
C4225280
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Noonan syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
896352
Concept ID:
C4225282
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Autosomal dominant palmoplantar keratoderma and congenital alopecia
MedGen UID:
930338
Concept ID:
C4304669
Disease or Syndrome
Palmoplantar keratoderma and congenital alopecia-1 (PPKCA1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by severe hyperkeratosis and congenital alopecia. Nail changes occur in some patients (summary by Castori et al., 2010). Also see PPKCA2 (212360), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital alopecia and progressive hyperkeratosis resulting in sclerodactyly, severe contractures and tapering of the digits, and pseudoainhum formation.
Ectodermal dysplasia 12, hypohidrotic/hair/tooth/nail type
MedGen UID:
934583
Concept ID:
C4310616
Disease or Syndrome
Some ectodermal dysplasias are here classified as congenital disorders characterized by abnormal development in 2 or more ectodermal structures (hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands) without other systemic findings. Hypohidrotic, or anhidrotic, ectodermal dysplasia (HED/EDA) is characterized by a triad of signs comprising sparse hair (hypotrichosis), abnormal or missing teeth (anodontia or hypodontia), and inability to sweat (anhidrosis or hypohidrosis). Typical clinical manifestations also include dryness of the skin, eyes, airways, and mucous membranes presumably due to the defective development of several exocrine glands. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia can be associated with dysmorphic features (forehead bumps, rings under the eyes, everted nose, and prominent lips) and occasionally with absent nipples (summary by Cluzeau et al., 2011).
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair 1
MedGen UID:
1379805
Concept ID:
C4478716
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair is characterized by facial features similar to those observed in Noonan syndrome (163950), including hypertelorism, ptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures, low-set posteriorly angulated ears, and overfolded pinnae. In addition, patients display short stature, frequently with growth hormone (GH; see 139250) deficiency; cognitive deficits; relative macrocephaly; small posterior fossa resulting in Chiari I malformation; hypernasal voice; cardiac defects, especially dysplasia of the mitral valve and septal defects; and ectodermal abnormalities, in which the most characteristic feature is the hair anomaly, including easily pluckable, sparse, thin, slow-growing hair (summary by Bertola et al., 2017). Reviews Komatsuzaki et al. (2010) reviewed the clinical manifestations of patients with Noonan syndrome, Costello syndrome (218040), and cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC; see 115150) compared to patients with mutations in the SHOC2 gene. They noted that although there is phenotypic overlap among the disorders, loose anagen/easily pluckable hair had not been reported in mutation-positive patients with Noonan, CFC, or Costello syndrome, and appeared to be a distinctive feature of SHOC2 mutation-positive patients. Genetic Heterogeneity of Noonan Syndrome-Like Disorder with Loose Anagen Hair NSLH2 (617506) is caused by mutation in the PPP1CB gene (600590) on chromosome 2p23.
Palmoplantar keratoderma, nonepidermolytic, focal 1
MedGen UID:
1644485
Concept ID:
C4552049
Disease or Syndrome
Focal nonepidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma-1 (FNEPPK1) is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by large, hard, compact, painful masses of keratin that develop at sites of recurrent friction, principally on the feet, though also on the palms and other sites, without evidence of epidermolysis (summary by Kelsell et al., 1995).
Cardiac, facial, and digital anomalies with developmental delay
MedGen UID:
1648330
Concept ID:
C4748484
Disease or Syndrome
CAFDADD is a multisystemic developmental disorder with variable cardiac and digital anomalies and facial dysmorphism. Some patients may have seizures and ocular/aural abnormalities (Tokita et al., 2018).
Respiratory papillomatosis, juvenile recurrent, congenital
MedGen UID:
1719353
Concept ID:
C5394112
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital juvenile respiratory papillomatosis (JRRP) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the development of recurrent growth of papillomas (warts) on respiratory epithelial cells in the upper airway, particularly the larynx. Patients present in early childhood with hoarse voice and, in severe cases, respiratory stridor due to airway obstruction. Affected individuals may also have mild dermatologic abnormalities similar to those observed in AIADK. While JRRP is a genetic disorder resulting from abnormal activation of the immune system, RRP in general is usually associated with acquired HPV infection, commonly with HPV types 6 and 11 (summary by Drutman et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with alopecia and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1775930
Concept ID:
C5436741
Disease or Syndrome
Bachmann-Bupp syndrome (BABS) is characterized by a distinctive type of alopecia, global developmental delay in the moderate to severe range, hypotonia, nonspecific dysmorphic features, behavioral abnormalities (autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder) and feeding difficulties. Hair is typically present at birth but may be sparse and of an unexpected color with subsequent loss of hair in large clumps within the first few weeks of life. Rare findings may include seizures with onset in later childhood and conductive hearing loss.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1794184
Concept ID:
C5561974
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and dysmorphic facies (NEDHYDF) is characterized by global developmental delay and hypotonia apparent from birth. Affected individuals have variably impaired intellectual development, often with speech delay and delayed walking. Seizures are generally not observed, although some patients may have single seizures or late-onset epilepsy. Most patients have prominent dysmorphic facial features. Additional features may include congenital cardiac defects (without arrhythmia), nonspecific renal anomalies, joint contractures or joint hyperextensibility, dry skin, and cryptorchidism. There is significant phenotypic variability in both the neurologic and extraneurologic manifestations (summary by Tan et al., 2022).
Trichothiodystrophy 9, nonphotosensitive
MedGen UID:
1794268
Concept ID:
C5562058
Disease or Syndrome
Nonphotosensitive trichothiodystrophy-9 (TTD9) is characterized by brittle hair and nails and scaly skin, accompanied by failure to thrive, microcephaly, and neuromotor developmental delay. Hair analysis shows low sulfur content, and skin fibroblasts demonstrate normal DNA repair efficiency after UV irradiation (Botta et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of trichothiodystrophy, see TTD1 (601675).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, dysmorphic facies, and skin abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1824058
Concept ID:
C5774285
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, dysmorphic facies, and skin abnormalities (NEDHFS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and poor or absent speech. Affected individuals have dysmorphic facies, including large abnormally shaped ears and strabismus, hypotonia, and dry skin with keratosis pilaris. Some patients develop seizures. Metabolic studies are unremarkable (Morava et al., 2021).
RECON progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
1841140
Concept ID:
C5830504
Disease or Syndrome
RECON progeroid syndrome (RECON) is a chromosomal instability disorder characterized by postnatal growth retardation, progeroid facial appearance, hypoplastic nose, prominent premaxilla, skin photosensitivity and xeroderma, muscle wasting with reduced subcutaneous fat, and slender elongated thumbs (Abu-Libdeh et al., 2022).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Kodali N, Patel VM, Schwartz RA
Ital J Dermatol Venerol 2023 Jun;158(3):217-223. Epub 2023 May 11 doi: 10.23736/S2784-8671.23.07594-1. PMID: 37166753
Kavamura MI, Leoni C, Neri G
Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 2022 Dec;190(4):452-458. Epub 2022 Dec 21 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.c.32027. PMID: 36541891
Maghfour J, Ly S, Haidari W, Taylor SL, Feldman SR
J Dermatolog Treat 2022 May;33(3):1231-1242. Epub 2020 Sep 14 doi: 10.1080/09546634.2020.1818678. PMID: 32886029

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Temiz SA, Ataseven A, Dursun R
J Cosmet Dermatol 2022 Sep;21(9):3814-3816. Epub 2022 May 31 doi: 10.1111/jocd.15088. PMID: 35569135
Itthipanichpong Y, Damkerngsuntorn W, Tangkijngamvong N, Udomsawaengsup S, Boonchayaanant P, Kumtornrut C, Kerr SJ, Asawanonda P, Rerknimitr P
BMC Dermatol 2020 Dec 9;20(1):21. doi: 10.1186/s12895-020-00120-z. PMID: 33298045Free PMC Article
Pediatr Dermatol 2019 Nov;36(6):937-938. doi: 10.1111/pde.14062. PMID: 31778553
Hirt PA, Castillo DE, Yosipovitch G, Keri JE
J Am Acad Dermatol 2019 Nov;81(5):1037-1057. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2018.12.070. PMID: 31610857
Thyssen JP, Godoy-Gijon E, Elias PM
Br J Dermatol 2013 Jun;168(6):1155-66. Epub 2013 May 6 doi: 10.1111/bjd.12219. PMID: 23301728Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Kodali N, Patel VM, Schwartz RA
Ital J Dermatol Venerol 2023 Jun;158(3):217-223. Epub 2023 May 11 doi: 10.23736/S2784-8671.23.07594-1. PMID: 37166753
Drivenes JL, Vasilescu IC, Bygum A
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2023 Mar 28;143(5) Epub 2023 Mar 7 doi: 10.4045/tidsskr.22.0513. PMID: 36987905
Hirt PA, Castillo DE, Yosipovitch G, Keri JE
J Am Acad Dermatol 2019 Nov;81(5):1037-1057. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2018.12.070. PMID: 31610857
Wang JF, Orlow SJ
Am J Clin Dermatol 2018 Oct;19(5):733-757. doi: 10.1007/s40257-018-0368-3. PMID: 30043128
Del Rosso JQ, Silverberg N, Zeichner JA
Dermatol Clin 2016 Apr;34(2):225-8. doi: 10.1016/j.det.2015.12.002. PMID: 27015783

Therapy

Greenzaid J, Nussbaum D, Friedman A
J Drugs Dermatol 2023 Oct 1;22(10):985-989. doi: 10.36849/JDD.7534. PMID: 37801530
Searle T, Ali FR, Al-Niaimi F
J Dermatolog Treat 2022 Mar;33(2):722-732. Epub 2020 Aug 4 doi: 10.1080/09546634.2020.1800579. PMID: 32730109
Pediatr Dermatol 2019 Nov;36(6):937-938. doi: 10.1111/pde.14062. PMID: 31778553
Wang JF, Orlow SJ
Am J Clin Dermatol 2018 Oct;19(5):733-757. doi: 10.1007/s40257-018-0368-3. PMID: 30043128
Zegarska B, Kallas D, Schwartz RA, Czajkowski R, Uchanska G, Placek W
Acta Dermatovenerol Alp Pannonica Adriat 2010 Oct;19(3):39-42. PMID: 20976421

Prognosis

Itthipanichpong Y, Damkerngsuntorn W, Tangkijngamvong N, Udomsawaengsup S, Boonchayaanant P, Kumtornrut C, Kerr SJ, Asawanonda P, Rerknimitr P
BMC Dermatol 2020 Dec 9;20(1):21. doi: 10.1186/s12895-020-00120-z. PMID: 33298045Free PMC Article
Ismail S, Omar SS
J Cosmet Dermatol 2020 May;19(5):1110-1120. Epub 2019 Sep 16 doi: 10.1111/jocd.13140. PMID: 31523919
Pediatr Dermatol 2019 Nov;36(6):937-938. doi: 10.1111/pde.14062. PMID: 31778553
Liu F, Yang Y, Zheng Y, Liang YH, Zeng K
Mol Med Rep 2018 Sep;18(3):3153-3158. Epub 2018 Jul 31 doi: 10.3892/mmr.2018.9342. PMID: 30066947Free PMC Article
Viglizzo G, Verrini A, Rongioletti F
Dermatology 2004;208(2):142-4. doi: 10.1159/000076489. PMID: 15057005

Clinical prediction guides

Suástegui-Rodríguez I, Camacho-Rosas LH, Peralta-Pedrero ML, Cruz FJ, Morales-Sánchez MA
Skinmed 2022;20(4):258-271. Epub 2022 Aug 31 PMID: 35976015
Salava A, Salo V, Remitz A
J Dermatol 2022 Sep;49(9):928-932. Epub 2022 May 26 doi: 10.1111/1346-8138.16477. PMID: 35616138Free PMC Article
Itthipanichpong Y, Damkerngsuntorn W, Tangkijngamvong N, Udomsawaengsup S, Boonchayaanant P, Kumtornrut C, Kerr SJ, Asawanonda P, Rerknimitr P
BMC Dermatol 2020 Dec 9;20(1):21. doi: 10.1186/s12895-020-00120-z. PMID: 33298045Free PMC Article
Vastarella M, Fabbrocini G, Sibaud V
Drug Saf 2020 May;43(5):395-408. doi: 10.1007/s40264-020-00907-6. PMID: 31981081
Perry HO, Su WP
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Recent systematic reviews

Al-Chaer RN, Bouazzi D, Jemec G, Mogensen M
Exp Dermatol 2023 Jul;32(7):945-954. Epub 2023 May 4 doi: 10.1111/exd.14830. PMID: 37140216
Maghfour J, Ly S, Haidari W, Taylor SL, Feldman SR
J Dermatolog Treat 2022 May;33(3):1231-1242. Epub 2020 Sep 14 doi: 10.1080/09546634.2020.1818678. PMID: 32886029
Kechichian E, Jabbour S, El Hachem L, Tomb R, Helou J
Dermatol Surg 2020 Nov;46(11):1397-1402. doi: 10.1097/DSS.0000000000002441. PMID: 32804891

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