U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex

MedGen UID:
86896
Concept ID:
C0079298
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Epidermolysis bullosa simplex with mottled pigmentation (subtype); Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Dowling-Meara type (subtype); Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Weber-Cockayne type (subtype)
SNOMED CT: Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (67144006)
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in individuals with two pathogenic alleles, either homozygotes (two copies of the same mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
 
Related genes: KRT14, KRT5
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0017610
OMIM® Phenotypic series: PS131760
Orphanet: ORPHA304

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex
Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some instances) that results in non-scarring blisters and erosions caused by minor mechanical trauma. EBS is distinguished from other types of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) or non-EB skin fragility syndromes by the location of the blistering in relation to the dermal-epidermal junction. In EBS, blistering occurs within basal keratinocytes. The severity of blistering ranges from limited to hands and feet to widespread involvement. Additional features can include hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles (keratoderma), nail dystrophy, milia, and hyper- and/or hypopigmentation. Rare EBS subtypes have been associated with additional clinical features including pyloric atresia, muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, and/or nephropathy. [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
Jodi Y So  |  Joyce Teng   view full author information

Additional description

From MedlinePlus Genetics
Epidermolysis bullosa simplex is one of a group of genetic conditions called epidermolysis bullosa that cause the skin to be very fragile and to blister easily. Blisters and areas of skin loss (erosions) occur in response to minor injury or friction, such as rubbing or scratching. Epidermolysis bullosa simplex is one of the major forms of epidermolysis bullosa. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary widely among affected individuals. Blistering primarily affects the hands and feet in mild cases, and the blisters usually heal without leaving scars. Severe cases of this condition involve widespread blistering that can lead to infections, dehydration, and other medical problems. Severe cases may be life-threatening in infancy.

Researchers have identified four major types of epidermolysis bullosa simplex.

Although the types differ in severity, their features overlap significantly, and they are caused by mutations in the same genes. Most researchers now consider the major forms of this condition to be part of a single disorder with a range of signs and symptoms.

The mildest form of epidermolysis bullosa simplex, known as the localized type (formerly called the Weber-Cockayne type), is characterized by skin blistering that begins anytime between childhood and adulthood and is usually limited to the hands and feet. Later in life, skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet may thicken and harden (hyperkeratosis).

The Dowling-Meara type is the most severe form of epidermolysis bullosa simplex. Extensive, severe blistering can occur anywhere on the body, including the inside of the mouth, and blisters may appear in clusters. Blistering is present from birth and tends to improve with age. Affected individuals also experience abnormal nail growth and hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles.

Another form of epidermolysis bullosa simplex, known as the other generalized type (formerly called the Koebner type), is associated with widespread blisters that appear at birth or in early infancy. The blistering tends to be less severe than in the Dowling-Meara type.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex with mottled pigmentation is characterized by patches of darker skin on the trunk, arms, and legs that fade in adulthood. This form of the disorder also involves skin blistering from early infancy, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and abnormal nail growth.

In addition to the four major types described above, researchers have identified another skin condition related to epidermolysis bullosa simplex, which they call the Ogna type. It is caused by mutations in a gene that is not associated with the other types of epidermolysis bullosa simplex. It is unclear whether the Ogna type is a subtype of epidermolysis bullosa simplex or represents a separate form of epidermolysis bullosa.

Several other variants of epidermolysis bullosa simplex have been proposed, but they appear to be very rare.  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/epidermolysis-bullosa-simplex

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Sun X, Zhang J, Yang Q, Lin J
J Dermatol 2024 Apr;51(4):e131-e132. Epub 2023 Nov 10 doi: 10.1111/1346-8138.17037. PMID: 37950437
Krämer S, Lucas J, Gamboa F, Peñarrocha Diago M, Peñarrocha Oltra D, Guzmán-Letelier M, Paul S, Molina G, Sepúlveda L, Araya I, Soto R, Arriagada C, Lucky AW, Mellerio JE, Cornwall R, Alsayer F, Schilke R, Antal MA, Castrillón F, Paredes C, Serrano MC, Clark V
Spec Care Dentist 2020 Nov;40 Suppl 1(Suppl 1):3-81. doi: 10.1111/scd.12511. PMID: 33202040Free PMC Article
Mellado F, Fuentes I, Palisson F, I Vergara J, Kantor A
Cornea 2018 Apr;37(4):442-447. doi: 10.1097/ICO.0000000000001525. PMID: 29384803

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Sussman M, Zhai L, Morquette A, Huang S, Hsu S
Clin Dermatol 2022 Sep-Oct;40(5):516-528. Epub 2022 Jan 1 doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2021.12.012. PMID: 34979265
Hon KL, Chu S, Leung AKC
Curr Pediatr Rev 2022;18(3):182-190. doi: 10.2174/1573396317666210525161252. PMID: 34036913
Zrelski MM, Kustermann M, Winter L
Cells 2021 Sep 19;10(9) doi: 10.3390/cells10092480. PMID: 34572129Free PMC Article
Martina E, Diotallevi F, Radi G, Campanati A, Offidani A
Toxins (Basel) 2021 Feb 5;13(2) doi: 10.3390/toxins13020120. PMID: 33562846Free PMC Article
Mariath LM, Santin JT, Schuler-Faccini L, Kiszewski AE
An Bras Dermatol 2020 Sep-Oct;95(5):551-569. Epub 2020 Jul 8 doi: 10.1016/j.abd.2020.05.001. PMID: 32732072Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Sussman M, Zhai L, Morquette A, Huang S, Hsu S
Clin Dermatol 2022 Sep-Oct;40(5):516-528. Epub 2022 Jan 1 doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2021.12.012. PMID: 34979265
Hon KL, Chu S, Leung AKC
Curr Pediatr Rev 2022;18(3):182-190. doi: 10.2174/1573396317666210525161252. PMID: 34036913
Mariath LM, Santin JT, Schuler-Faccini L, Kiszewski AE
An Bras Dermatol 2020 Sep-Oct;95(5):551-569. Epub 2020 Jul 8 doi: 10.1016/j.abd.2020.05.001. PMID: 32732072Free PMC Article
Khani P, Ghazi F, Zekri A, Nasri F, Behrangi E, Aghdam AM, Mirzaei H
J Cell Physiol 2018 Jan;234(1):289-297. Epub 2018 Aug 4 doi: 10.1002/jcp.26898. PMID: 30078200
Turcan I, Pasmooij AM, Van den Akker PC, Lemmink H, Sinke RJ, Jonkman MF
JAMA Dermatol 2016 Oct 1;152(10):1137-1141. doi: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2016.2268. PMID: 27384765

Therapy

Kern JS, Sprecher E, Fernandez MF, Schauer F, Bodemer C, Cunningham T, Löwe S, Davis C, Sumeray M, Bruckner AL, Murrell DF; EASE investigators
Br J Dermatol 2023 Jan 23;188(1):12-21. doi: 10.1093/bjd/ljac001. PMID: 36689495
Martina E, Diotallevi F, Radi G, Campanati A, Offidani A
Toxins (Basel) 2021 Feb 5;13(2) doi: 10.3390/toxins13020120. PMID: 33562846Free PMC Article
Castela E, Tulic MK, Rozières A, Bourrat E, Nicolas JF, Kanitakis J, Vabres P, Bessis D, Mazereeuw J, Morice-Picard F, Baty D, Berard F, Lacour JP, Passeron T, Chiaverini C
Br J Dermatol 2019 Feb;180(2):357-364. Epub 2018 Dec 2 doi: 10.1111/bjd.16897. PMID: 29932457
Chamcheu JC, Wood GS, Siddiqui IA, Syed DN, Adhami VM, Teng JM, Mukhtar H
Exp Dermatol 2012 Jul;21(7):481-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0625.2012.01534.x. PMID: 22716242Free PMC Article
McLean WH, Moore CB
Hum Mol Genet 2011 Oct 15;20(R2):R189-97. Epub 2011 Sep 2 doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddr379. PMID: 21890491

Prognosis

Hon KL, Chu S, Leung AKC
Curr Pediatr Rev 2022;18(3):182-190. doi: 10.2174/1573396317666210525161252. PMID: 34036913
Goyal T, Varshney A, Bakshi SK
Indian J Pediatr 2021 Jun;88(6):574-578. Epub 2011 Oct 25 doi: 10.1007/s12098-011-0592-9. PMID: 22037857
Chamcheu JC, Wood GS, Siddiqui IA, Syed DN, Adhami VM, Teng JM, Mukhtar H
Exp Dermatol 2012 Jul;21(7):481-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0625.2012.01534.x. PMID: 22716242Free PMC Article
Chamcheu JC, Siddiqui IA, Syed DN, Adhami VM, Liovic M, Mukhtar H
Arch Biochem Biophys 2011 Apr 15;508(2):123-37. Epub 2010 Dec 19 doi: 10.1016/j.abb.2010.12.019. PMID: 21176769Free PMC Article
Shimizu H, Takizawa Y, Pulkkinen L, Murata S, Kawai M, Hachisuka H, Udono M, Uitto J, Nishikawa T
J Am Acad Dermatol 1999 Dec;41(6):950-6. doi: 10.1016/s0190-9622(99)70252-5. PMID: 10570379

Clinical prediction guides

Hon KL, Chu S, Leung AKC
Curr Pediatr Rev 2022;18(3):182-190. doi: 10.2174/1573396317666210525161252. PMID: 34036913
Knöbel M, O'Toole EA, Smith FJ
Cell Tissue Res 2015 Jun;360(3):583-9. Epub 2015 Jan 27 doi: 10.1007/s00441-014-2105-4. PMID: 25620412
Schwieger-Briel A, Chakkittakandiyil A, Lara-Corrales I, Aujla N, Lane AT, Lucky AW, Bruckner AL, Pope E
Pediatr Dermatol 2015 Jan-Feb;32(1):41-52. Epub 2014 Mar 20 doi: 10.1111/pde.12317. PMID: 24650374
Bolling MC, Lemmink HH, Jansen GH, Jonkman MF
Br J Dermatol 2011 Mar;164(3):637-44. Epub 2011 Feb 17 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2010.10146.x. PMID: 21375516
Smith F
Am J Clin Dermatol 2003;4(5):347-64. doi: 10.2165/00128071-200304050-00005. PMID: 12688839

Recent systematic reviews

Martina E, Diotallevi F, Radi G, Campanati A, Offidani A
Toxins (Basel) 2021 Feb 5;13(2) doi: 10.3390/toxins13020120. PMID: 33562846Free PMC Article
Krämer S, Lucas J, Gamboa F, Peñarrocha Diago M, Peñarrocha Oltra D, Guzmán-Letelier M, Paul S, Molina G, Sepúlveda L, Araya I, Soto R, Arriagada C, Lucky AW, Mellerio JE, Cornwall R, Alsayer F, Schilke R, Antal MA, Castrillón F, Paredes C, Serrano MC, Clark V
Spec Care Dentist 2020 Nov;40 Suppl 1(Suppl 1):3-81. doi: 10.1111/scd.12511. PMID: 33202040Free PMC Article
Xie D, Bilgic-Temel A, Abu Alrub N, Murrell DF
Pediatr Dermatol 2019 Jul;36(4):430-436. Epub 2019 Jun 9 doi: 10.1111/pde.13866. PMID: 31177584

Supplemental Content

Table of contents

    Clinical resources

    Practice guidelines

    • PubMed
      See practice and clinical guidelines in PubMed. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.
    • Bookshelf
      See practice and clinical guidelines in NCBI Bookshelf. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.

    Recent activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...