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Spastic diplegia

MedGen UID:
44181
Concept ID:
C0023882
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
Synonyms: Diplegia, Spastic; Diplegias, Spastic; Little Disease; Little's Disease; Spastic Diplegia; Spastic Diplegias
SNOMED CT: Spastic diplegia (281411007)
 
HPO: HP:0001264

Definition

Spasticity (neuromuscular hypertonia) primarily in the muscles of the legs, hips, and pelvis. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • Spastic diplegia

Conditions with this feature

Purine-nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency
MedGen UID:
75653
Concept ID:
C0268125
Disease or Syndrome
Purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency disorder characterized mainly by decreased T-cell function. Some patients also have neurologic impairment (review by Aust et al., 1992).
Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome
MedGen UID:
82815
Concept ID:
C0268540
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is a disorder of the urea cycle and ornithine degradation pathway. Clinical manifestations and age of onset vary among individuals even in the same family. Neonatal onset (~8% of affected individuals). Manifestations of hyperammonemia usually begin 24-48 hours after feeding begins and can include lethargy, somnolence, refusal to feed, vomiting, tachypnea with respiratory alkalosis, and/or seizures. Infantile, childhood, and adult onset (~92%). Affected individuals may present with: Chronic neurocognitive deficits (including developmental delay, ataxia, spasticity, learning disabilities, cognitive deficits, and/or unexplained seizures); Acute encephalopathy secondary to hyperammonemic crisis precipitated by a variety of factors; and Chronic liver dysfunction (unexplained elevation of liver transaminases with or without mild coagulopathy, with or without mild hyperammonemia and protein intolerance). Neurologic findings and cognitive abilities can continue to deteriorate despite early metabolic control that prevents hyperammonemia.
Saccharopinuria
MedGen UID:
75693
Concept ID:
C0268556
Disease or Syndrome
Saccharopinuria, also known as hyperlysinemia type II, is an autosomal recessive metabolic condition with few, if any, clinical manifestations. Hyperlysinemia type II and hyperlysinemia type I (238700) both result from deficiency of the bifunctional enzyme AASS (605113) on chromosome 7q31. The AASS gene encodes lysine alpha-ketoglutarate reductase and saccharopine dehydrogenase, which catalyze, respectively, the sequential conversion of lysine to saccharopine and saccharopine to alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde and glutamate (summary by Tondo et al., 2013). In hyperlysinemia type I, both enzymatic functions of AASS are defective and patients have increased serum lysine and possibly increased saccharopine; in hyperlysinemia type II, most of the first enzymatic function is retained, and patients tend to have isolated saccharopine increase (Cox, 1985; Cox et al., 1986).
Glutaric aciduria, type 1
MedGen UID:
124337
Concept ID:
C0268595
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of untreated glutaric acidemia type 1 (GA-1) ranges from the more common form (infantile-onset disease) to the less common form (later-onset disease – i.e., after age 6 years). Of note, the GA-1 phenotype can vary widely between untreated family members with the same genotype, primarily as a function of the age at which the first acute encephalopathic crisis occurred: three months to six years in infantile-onset GA-1 and after age six years in later-onset GA-1. Characteristically these crises result in acute bilateral striatal injury and subsequent complex movement disorders. In the era of newborn screening (NBS), the prompt initiation of treatment of asymptomatic infants detected by NBS means that most individuals who would have developed manifestations of either infantile-onset or later-onset GA-1 remain asymptomatic; however, they may be at increased risk for other manifestations (e.g., renal disease) that are becoming apparent as the understanding of the natural history of treated GA-1 continues to evolve.
Fetal iodine deficiency disorder
MedGen UID:
83336
Concept ID:
C0342200
Disease or Syndrome
Severely reduced physical and mental growth associated with pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs and symptoms, due to dietary iodine deficiency.
Microphthalmia, syndromic 1
MedGen UID:
162898
Concept ID:
C0796016
Congenital Abnormality
Microphthalmia-ankyloblepharon-intellectual disability syndrome is characterized by microphthalmia, ankyloblepharon and intellectual deficit. It has been described in seven male patients from two generations of a Northern Ireland family. The causative gene is localized to the Xq27-q28 region. The syndrome is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait.
Paine syndrome
MedGen UID:
234691
Concept ID:
C1412041
Disease or Syndrome
Mental retardation, microcephaly, spastic diplegia, seizures, and mild aminoaciduria are the principal features. Seemanova syndrome 1 and Paine syndrome are considered as variants of the same entity termed Paine-Seemanova syndrome.
Warburg micro syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
333142
Concept ID:
C1838625
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation
MedGen UID:
375009
Concept ID:
C1842763
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation (SPENCDI) is an immunoosseous dysplasia combining the typical metaphyseal and vertebral bone lesions of spondyloenchondrodysplasia (SPENCD) with immune dysfunction and neurologic involvement. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by radiolucent and irregular spondylar and metaphyseal lesions that represent islands of chondroid tissue within bone. The vertebral bodies show dorsally accentuated platyspondyly with disturbance of ossification. Clinical abnormalities such as short stature, rhizomelic micromelia, increased lumbar lordosis, barrel chest, facial anomalies, and clumsy movements may be present (Menger et al., 1989). Central nervous system involvement includes spasticity, mental retardation, and cerebral calcifications, and immune dysregulation ranges from autoimmunity to immunodeficiency. Neurologic and autoimmune manifestations have been observed in different combinations within a single family, suggesting that this disorder may be defined by specific radiographic features but has remarkably pleiotropic manifestations (Renella et al., 2006). Briggs et al. (2016) also noted variability in skeletal, neurologic, and immune phenotypes, which was sometimes marked between members of the same family. Classification of the Enchondromatoses In their classification of the enchondromatoses, Spranger et al. (1978) called Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome types I and II enchondromatosis, respectively; metachondromatosis (156250), type III; and spondyloenchondrodysplasia (SPENCD), also called spondyloenchondromatosis, type IV; enchondromatosis with irregular vertebral lesions, type V; and generalized enchondromatosis, type VI. Halal and Azouz (1991) added 3 tentative categories to the 6 in the classification of Spranger et al. (1978). Pansuriya et al. (2010) suggested a new classification of enchondromatosis (multiple enchondromas).
Spastic diplegia and intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
376526
Concept ID:
C1849139
Disease or Syndrome
Oculorenocerebellar syndrome
MedGen UID:
340516
Concept ID:
C1850331
Disease or Syndrome
A rare multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome with characteristics of profound intellectual disability, choreoathetosis, progressive spastic diplegia, progressive tapetoretinal degeneration with loss of retinal vessels and glomerulopathy resulting in death late in the first or early in the second decade of life. Absence of the cerebellar granular layer has been reported.
Epilepsy, photogenic, with spastic diplegia and intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
347333
Concept ID:
C1856931
Disease or Syndrome
Encephalomalacia, multilocular
MedGen UID:
341670
Concept ID:
C1856991
Disease or Syndrome
Anophthalmia/microphthalmia-esophageal atresia syndrome
MedGen UID:
347232
Concept ID:
C1859773
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of SOX2 disorder includes anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia, brain malformations, developmental delay / intellectual disability, esophageal atresia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (manifest as cryptorchidism and micropenis in males, gonadal dysgenesis infrequently in females, and delayed puberty in both sexes), pituitary hypoplasia, postnatal growth delay, hypotonia, seizures, and spastic or dystonic movements.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 2, juvenile
MedGen UID:
349246
Concept ID:
C1859807
Disease or Syndrome
ALS2-related disorder involves retrograde degeneration of the upper motor neurons of the pyramidal tracts and comprises a clinical continuum of the following three phenotypes: Infantile ascending hereditary spastic paraplegia (IAHSP), characterized by onset of spasticity with increased reflexes and sustained clonus of the lower limbs within the first two years of life, progressive weakness and spasticity of the upper limbs by age seven to eight years, and wheelchair dependence in the second decade with progression toward severe spastic tetraparesis and a pseudobulbar syndrome caused by progressive cranial nerve involvement. Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis (JPLS), characterized by upper motor neuron findings of pseudobulbar palsy and spastic quadriplegia without dementia or cerebellar, extrapyramidal, or sensory signs. Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (JALS or ALS2), characterized by onset between ages three and 20 years. All affected individuals show a spastic pseudobulbar syndrome (spasticity of speech and swallowing) together with spastic paraplegia. Some individuals are bedridden by age 12 to 50 years.
Intellectual disability, X-linked syndromic, Turner type
MedGen UID:
394425
Concept ID:
C2678046
Disease or Syndrome
Turner-type X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder (MRXST) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Some affected families show X-linked recessive inheritance, with only males being affected and carrier females having no abnormal findings. In other affected families, males are severely affected, and female mutation carriers show milder cognitive abnormalities or dysmorphic features. In addition, there are female patients with de novo mutations who show the full phenotype, despite skewed X-chromosome inactivation. Affected individuals show global developmental delay from infancy, with variably impaired intellectual development and poor or absent speech, often with delayed walking. Dysmorphic features are common and can include macrocephaly, microcephaly, deep-set eyes, hypotelorism, small palpebral fissures, dysplastic, large, or low-set ears, long face, bitemporal narrowing, high-arched palate, thin upper lip, and scoliosis or mild distal skeletal anomalies, such as brachydactyly or tapered fingers. Males tend to have cryptorchidism. Other features, such as hypotonia, seizures, and delayed bone age, are more variable (summary by Moortgat et al., 2018).
Intestinal pseudoobstruction, neuronal, chronic idiopathic, X-linked
MedGen UID:
412536
Concept ID:
C2746068
Disease or Syndrome
FLNA deficiency is associated with a phenotypic spectrum that includes FLNA-related periventricular nodular heterotopia (Huttenlocher syndrome), congenital heart disease (patent ductus arteriosus, atrial and ventricular septal defects), valvular dystrophy, dilation and rupture of the thoracic aortic, pulmonary disease (pulmonary hypertension, alveolar hypoplasia, emphysema, asthma, chronic bronchitis), gastrointestinal dysmotility and obstruction, joint hypermobility, and macrothrombocytopenia.
Warburg micro syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
481844
Concept ID:
C3280214
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Severe intellectual disability-progressive spastic diplegia syndrome
MedGen UID:
767363
Concept ID:
C3554449
Disease or Syndrome
CTNNB1 neurodevelopmental disorder (CTNNB1-NDD) is characterized in all individuals by mild-to-profound cognitive impairment and in up to 39% of reported individuals by exudative vitreoretinopathy, an ophthalmologic finding consistent with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR). Other common findings include truncal hypotonia, peripheral spasticity, dystonia, behavior problems, microcephaly, and refractive errors and strabismus. Less common features include intrauterine growth restriction, feeding difficulties, and scoliosis.
Spasticity-ataxia-gait anomalies syndrome
MedGen UID:
905660
Concept ID:
C4225178
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset spasticity with hyperglycinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive spasticity that results in impaired gait in the first decade of life. Imaging of the central nervous system shows leukodystrophy and/or lesions in the upper spinal cord. More variable features include visual defects and mild learning disabilities. Serum glycine is increased, but CSF glycine is only mildly increased or normal; serum lactate is normal. The disorder represents a form of 'variant' nonketotic hyperglycinemia and is distinct from classic nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH, or GCE; 605899), which is characterized by significantly increased CSF glycine. Several forms of 'variant' NKH, including SPAHGC, appear to result from defects of mitochondrial lipoate biosynthesis (summary by Baker et al., 2014).
Intellectual disability, X-linked, syndromic 33
MedGen UID:
895979
Concept ID:
C4225418
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder-33 (MRXS33) is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features (summary by O'Rawe et al., 2015).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 58
MedGen UID:
934608
Concept ID:
C4310641
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Any autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ELP2 gene.
Cerebral palsy, spastic quadriplegic, 3
MedGen UID:
934734
Concept ID:
C4310767
Disease or Syndrome
Any spastic quadriplegia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ADD3 gene.
Perrault syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1640257
Concept ID:
C4551721
Disease or Syndrome
Perrault syndrome is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in males and females and ovarian dysfunction in females. SNHL is bilateral and ranges from profound with prelingual (congenital) onset to moderate with early-childhood onset. When onset is in early childhood, hearing loss can be progressive. Ovarian dysfunction ranges from gonadal dysgenesis (absent or streak gonads) manifesting as primary amenorrhea to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) defined as cessation of menses before age 40 years. Fertility in affected males is reported as normal (although the number of reported males is limited). Neurologic features described in some individuals with Perrault syndrome include learning difficulties and developmental delay, cerebellar ataxia, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 58
MedGen UID:
1646861
Concept ID:
C4693367
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-58 (DEE58) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the onset of infantile spasms and refractory seizures in the first days or months of life. Affected individuals have global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, usually with absent speech and inability to walk. Additional features include optic atrophy with poor or absent visual fixation, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and spasticity (summary by Hamdan et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Hypomyelination with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and leg spasticity
MedGen UID:
1667792
Concept ID:
C4755254
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelination with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and leg spasticity is an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy characterized by onset in the first year of life of severe spasticity, mainly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in an inability to achieve independent ambulation. Affected individuals show delayed motor development and nystagmus; some may have mild mental retardation. Brain MRI shows hypomyelination and white matter lesions in the cerebrum, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord (summary by Taft et al., 2013).
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 21
MedGen UID:
1732562
Concept ID:
C5436727
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 21 (MC4DN21) is an autosomal recessive multisystem metabolic disorder characterized by the onset of symptoms in infancy. Affected individuals present with congenital lactic acidosis and later show global developmental delay with delayed speech and learning disabilities. Additional features include motor dysfunction manifest as spasticity, dystonia, and pyramidal tract signs. Ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, and seizures may also occur. Brain imaging shows T2-weighted hyperintensities in subcortical regions, consistent with a clinical diagnosis of Leigh syndrome (see 256000). Patient tissues show variably decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV (Pitceathly et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Martsolf syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1778114
Concept ID:
C5542298
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Martsolf syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1779703
Concept ID:
C5543626
Disease or Syndrome
Martsolf syndrome-2 (MARTS2) is an autosomal recessive disorder with the main features of congenital cataracts, mildly to severely impaired intellectual development, and facial dysmorphism. Other features include brain malformations, microcephaly, and hypogonadism-hypogenitalism (summary by Koparir et al., 2019).
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794167
Concept ID:
C5561957
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities (DDISBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from early childhood. Intellectual disability can range from mild to severe. Additional variable features may include dysmorphic facial features, seizures, hypotonia, motor abnormalities such as Tourette syndrome or dystonia, and hearing loss (summary by Cousin et al., 2021).
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
1794176
Concept ID:
C5561966
Disease or Syndrome
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome-9 (AGS9) is a type I interferonopathy characterized by severe developmental delay and progressive neurologic deterioration. Patients present in infancy with irritability and spasticity. Brain imaging shows diffusely abnormal white matter, cerebral atrophy, and intracranial calcification. Premature death has been associated with renal and/or hepatic failure (Uggenti et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, see AGS1 (225750).
Trichothiodystrophy 8, nonphotosensitive
MedGen UID:
1794267
Concept ID:
C5562057
Disease or Syndrome
Nonphotosensitive trichothiodystrophy-8 (TTD8) is characterized by brittle hair and nails and scaly skin, accompanied by failure to thrive, microcephaly, and neuromotor developmental delay. Hair analysis shows low sulfur content, and skin fibroblasts demonstrate normal DNA repair efficiency after UV irradiation (Botta et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of trichothiodystrophy, see TTD1 (601675).
Recurrent metabolic encephalomyopathic crises-rhabdomyolysis-cardiac arrhythmia-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
1798947
Concept ID:
C5567524
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with TANGO2-related metabolic encephalopathy and arrhythmias can present in acute metabolic crisis (hypoglycemia, elevated lactate, mild hyperammonemia) or with developmental delay, regression, and/or seizures. The acute presentation varies from profound muscle weakness, ataxia, and/or disorientation to a comatose state. Individuals can present with intermittent acute episodes of rhabdomyolysis. The first episode of myoglobinuria has been known to occur as early as age five months. Acute renal tubular damage due to myoglobinuria can result in acute kidney injury and renal failure. During acute illness, transient electrocardiogram changes can be seen; the most common is QT prolongation. Life-threatening recurrent ventricular tachycardia or torsade de pointes occurs primarily during times of acute illness. Individuals who do not present in metabolic crises may present with gait incoordination, progressively unsteady gait, difficulty with speech, or clumsiness. Intellectual disability of variable severity is observed in almost all individuals. Seizures are observed outside the periods of crises in more than 75% of individuals. Hypothyroidism has been reported in more than one third of individuals.
Braddock-carey syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1823961
Concept ID:
C5774188
Disease or Syndrome
Braddock-Carey syndrome (BRDCS) is characterized by Pierre-Robin sequence, persistent congenital thrombocytopenia, agenesis of the corpus callosum, severe developmental delay, microcephaly, high forehead, sparse curly hair, downslanting palpebral fissures, telecanthus, inverted U-shaped upper vermilion, enamel hypoplasia, large posteriorly rotated ears, clinodactyly, and camptodactyly (Braddock et al., 2016). Genetic Heterogeneity of Braddock-Carey Syndrome BRDCS2 (619981) is caused by mutation in the KIF15 gene (617569) on chromosome 3p21.
Tessadori-Van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1824083
Concept ID:
C5774310
Disease or Syndrome
Tessadori-Bicknell-van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome-3 (TEBIVANED3) is characterized by global developmental delay with poor overall growth, impaired intellectual development, and speech difficulties. More variable features include hypotonia, microcephaly, and dysmorphic facies. The severity and manifestations of the disorder are highly variable (Tessadori et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Tessadori-Bicknell-van Haaften neurodevelopmental disorder, see TEBIVANED1 (619758).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Nicolini-Panisson RD, Tedesco AP, Folle MR, Donadio MVF
Rev Paul Pediatr 2018 Jan-Mar;36(1):9. Epub 2018 Jan 15 doi: 10.1590/1984-0462/;2018;36;1;00005. PMID: 29412426Free PMC Article
Huntsman R, Lemire E, Norton J, Dzus A, Blakley P, Hasal S
Arch Dis Child 2015 May;100(5):500-4. Epub 2014 Nov 18 doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2014-307443. PMID: 25700542
Sussman MD, Aiona MD
J Pediatr Orthop B 2004 Mar;13(2):S1-12. doi: 10.1097/00009957-200403000-00016. PMID: 15076595

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Matusiak-Wieczorek E, Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk E, Synder M, Borowski A
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 Sep 19;17(18) doi: 10.3390/ijerph17186846. PMID: 32961681Free PMC Article
Hussein ZA, Salem IA, Ali MS
J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact 2019 Dec 1;19(4):500-506. PMID: 31789301Free PMC Article
Song S, Lee K, Jung S, Park S, Cho H, Lee G
Am J Case Rep 2018 Oct 31;19:1292-1300. doi: 10.12659/AJCR.910468. PMID: 30377290Free PMC Article
Hyland K, Shoffner J, Heales SJ
J Inherit Metab Dis 2010 Oct;33(5):563-70. Epub 2010 Jul 29 doi: 10.1007/s10545-010-9159-6. PMID: 20668945
Johnston MV, Hoon AH Jr
Neuromolecular Med 2006;8(4):435-50. doi: 10.1385/NMM:8:4:435. PMID: 17028368

Diagnosis

Song S, Lee K, Jung S, Park S, Cho H, Lee G
Am J Case Rep 2018 Oct 31;19:1292-1300. doi: 10.12659/AJCR.910468. PMID: 30377290Free PMC Article
Huntsman R, Lemire E, Norton J, Dzus A, Blakley P, Hasal S
Arch Dis Child 2015 May;100(5):500-4. Epub 2014 Nov 18 doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2014-307443. PMID: 25700542
des Portes V
Handb Clin Neurol 2013;111:297-306. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-52891-9.00035-X. PMID: 23622180
Dutra LA, Braga-Neto P, Pedroso JL, Povoas Barsottini OG
Adv Exp Med Biol 2012;724:344-50. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4614-0653-2_26. PMID: 22411255
Hyland K, Shoffner J, Heales SJ
J Inherit Metab Dis 2010 Oct;33(5):563-70. Epub 2010 Jul 29 doi: 10.1007/s10545-010-9159-6. PMID: 20668945

Therapy

Abdelhalim SM, Shoukry KE, Alsharnoubi J
Lasers Med Sci 2023 Aug 12;38(1):182. doi: 10.1007/s10103-023-03841-y. PMID: 37572215Free PMC Article
Matusiak-Wieczorek E, Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk E, Synder M, Borowski A
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 Sep 19;17(18) doi: 10.3390/ijerph17186846. PMID: 32961681Free PMC Article
Hussein ZA, Salem IA, Ali MS
J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact 2019 Dec 1;19(4):500-506. PMID: 31789301Free PMC Article
Song S, Lee K, Jung S, Park S, Cho H, Lee G
Am J Case Rep 2018 Oct 31;19:1292-1300. doi: 10.12659/AJCR.910468. PMID: 30377290Free PMC Article
Hyland K, Shoffner J, Heales SJ
J Inherit Metab Dis 2010 Oct;33(5):563-70. Epub 2010 Jul 29 doi: 10.1007/s10545-010-9159-6. PMID: 20668945

Prognosis

Menon J, Shanmugam N, Rammohan A, Hakeem A, Reddy MS, Rela M
Pediatr Transplant 2022 Dec;26(8):e14376. Epub 2022 Aug 12 doi: 10.1111/petr.14376. PMID: 35959774
Song S, Lee K, Jung S, Park S, Cho H, Lee G
Am J Case Rep 2018 Oct 31;19:1292-1300. doi: 10.12659/AJCR.910468. PMID: 30377290Free PMC Article
Cho KH, Shim SH, Kim M
Clin Genet 2018 Apr;93(4):721-730. Epub 2017 Sep 17 doi: 10.1111/cge.13058. PMID: 28543186
Babb A, Carlson WO
S D Med 2008 Feb;61(2):53, 55-7. PMID: 18432151
Accardo J, Kammann H, Hoon AH Jr
J Pediatr 2004 Aug;145(2 Suppl):S19-27. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2004.05.018. PMID: 15292883

Clinical prediction guides

K A, Saini L, Gunasekaran PK, Singh P, Sahu JK, Sankhyan N, Sharma R, Bhati A, Yadav J, Sharawat IK
Seizure 2022 Oct;101:190-196. Epub 2022 Aug 24 doi: 10.1016/j.seizure.2022.08.009. PMID: 36070632
Menon J, Shanmugam N, Rammohan A, Hakeem A, Reddy MS, Rela M
Pediatr Transplant 2022 Dec;26(8):e14376. Epub 2022 Aug 12 doi: 10.1111/petr.14376. PMID: 35959774
Eken MM, Lamberts RP, Du Toit J, Verkoeijen PPJL, Kosel E, Langerak NG
J Orthop Sci 2020 May;25(3):507-512. Epub 2019 Jun 28 doi: 10.1016/j.jos.2019.05.023. PMID: 31262451
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