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Hip osteoarthritis

MedGen UID:
14530
Concept ID:
C0029410
Disease or Syndrome
Synonym: Osteoarthritis of hip
SNOMED CT: Degenerative joint disease of hip (239872002); OA - Osteoarthritis of hip (239872002); Osteoarthritis of hip (239872002)
 
HPO: HP:0008843
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0006629
OMIM®: 612400

Definition

Osteoarthritis of the hip joint. [from NCI]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVOsteoarthritis, hip

Conditions with this feature

Proximal femoral epiphysiolysis
MedGen UID:
57704
Concept ID:
C0149887
Disease or Syndrome
Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is defined as a posterior and inferior slippage of the proximal epiphysis of the femur onto the metaphysis (femoral neck), occurring through the physeal plate during the early adolescent growth spurt.
Namaqualand hip dysplasia
MedGen UID:
609409
Concept ID:
C0432214
Disease or Syndrome
Mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia due to COL2A1 mutation with early-onset osteoarthritis is a type 2 collagen-related bone disorder characterized by precocious, generalized osteoarthritis (with onset as early as childhood) and mild, dysplastic spinal changes (flattening of vertebrae, irregular endplates and wedge-shaped deformities) resulting in a mildly short trunk.
Angel-shaped phalango-epiphyseal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
366028
Concept ID:
C1739384
Congenital Abnormality
A form of acromelic dysplasia with the distinctive radiological sign of angel-shaped middle phalanges, a typical metacarpophalangeal pattern profile (mainly affecting first metacarpals and middle phalanges of second, third and fifth digits which all appear short), epiphyseal changes in the hips and in some, abnormal dentition and delayed bone age. A rare disease with less than 20 cases reported in the literature, however, it is likely under diagnosed. Caused by mutations in the growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) gene, located on chromosome 20q11.2, encoding CDMP1 (cartilage derived morphogenetic protein). CDMP1 belongs to the TGF beta super family and plays a role in bone growth and joint morphogenesis. Transmitted as an autosomal dominant condition.
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia type 1
MedGen UID:
325376
Concept ID:
C1838280
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) presents in early childhood, usually with pain in the hips and/or knees after exercise. Affected children complain of fatigue with long-distance walking. Waddling gait may be present. Adult height is either in the lower range of normal or mildly shortened. The limbs are relatively short in comparison to the trunk. Pain and joint deformity progress, resulting in early-onset osteoarthritis, particularly of the large weight-bearing joints.
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
338604
Concept ID:
C1849054
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive form of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda.
Vitreoretinopathy with phalangeal epiphyseal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
343940
Concept ID:
C1852989
Disease or Syndrome
Vitreoretinopathy with phalangeal epiphyseal dysplasia (VPED) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, premature arthropathy, and development of phalangeal epiphyseal dysplasia, resulting in brachydactyly. Stature is normal, and high myopia, cleft palate, and midfacial hypoplasia are absent (Richards et al., 2002).
Spondyloarthropathy, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
400145
Concept ID:
C1862852
Finding
Spondyloarthropathy (SpA), one of the commonest chronic rheumatic diseases, includes a spectrum of related disorders comprising the prototype ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a subset of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), reactive arthritis (ReA), arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease, and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy (Miceli-Richard et al., 2004). These phenotypes are difficult to differentiate because they may occur simultaneously or sequentially in the same patient. Studies have suggested that a predominant shared component, including HLA-B27, predisposes to all phenotypic subsets, and that these subsets should be considered as various phenotypic expressions of the same disease (Said-Nahal et al., 2000, Said-Nahal et al., 2001). Braun and Sieper (2007) provided a detailed review of ankylosing spondylitis, including clinical features, pathogenesis, and management. Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Spondyloarthropathy Additional susceptibility loci for spondyloarthropathy have been identified on chromosome 9q31-q34 (SPDA2; 183840) and chromosome 2q36 (SPDA3; 613238).
Aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome
MedGen UID:
462437
Concept ID:
C3151087
Disease or Syndrome
Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant.
Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis 2
MedGen UID:
465707
Concept ID:
C3179239
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of CLCN7-related osteopetrosis includes infantile malignant CLCN7-related autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO), intermediate autosomal osteopetrosis (IAO), and autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADOII; Albers-Schönberg disease). ARO. Onset is at birth. Findings may include: fractures; reduced growth; sclerosis of the skull base (with or without choanal stenosis or hydrocephalus) resulting in optic nerve compression, facial palsy, and hearing loss; absence of the bone marrow cavity resulting in severe anemia and thrombocytopenia; dental abnormalities, odontomas, and risk for mandibular osteomyelitis; and hypocalcemia with tetanic seizures and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Without treatment maximal life span in ARO is ten years. IAO. Onset is in childhood. Findings may include: fractures after minor trauma, characteristic skeletal radiographic changes found incidentally, mild anemia, and occasional visual impairment secondary to optic nerve compression. Life expectancy in IAO is usually normal. ADOII. Onset is usually late childhood or adolescence. Findings may include: fractures (in any long bone and/or the posterior arch of a vertebra), scoliosis, hip osteoarthritis, and osteomyelitis of the mandible or septic osteitis or osteoarthritis elsewhere. Cranial nerve compression is rare.
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, X-linked
MedGen UID:
762085
Concept ID:
C3541456
Congenital Abnormality
X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda is a condition that impairs bone growth and occurs almost exclusively in males. The name of the condition indicates that it affects the bones of the spine (spondylo-) and the ends of long bones (epiphyses) in the arms and legs. "Tarda" indicates that signs and symptoms of this condition are not present at birth, but appear later in childhood, typically between ages 6 and 10.\n\nMales with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda have skeletal abnormalities and short stature. Affected boys grow steadily until late childhood, when their growth slows. Their adult height ranges from 4 feet 6 inches (137 cm) to 5 feet 4 inches (163 cm). Impaired growth of the spinal bones (vertebrae) primarily causes the short stature. Spinal abnormalities include flattened vertebrae (platyspondyly) with hump-shaped bulges, progressive thinning of the discs between vertebrae, and an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis or kyphosis). These spinal problems also cause back pain in people with this condition. Individuals with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda have a short torso and neck, and their arms are disproportionately long compared to their height.\n\nOther skeletal features of X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda include an abnormality of the hip joint that causes the upper leg bones to turn inward (coxa vara); multiple abnormalities of the epiphyses, including a short upper end of the thigh bone (femoral neck); and a broad, barrel-shaped chest. A painful joint condition called osteoarthritis that typically occurs in older adults often develops in early adulthood in people with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda and worsens over time, most often affecting the hips, knees, and shoulders.
Short stature and advanced bone age, with or without early-onset osteoarthritis and/or osteochondritis dissecans
MedGen UID:
777109
Concept ID:
C3665488
Disease or Syndrome
Patients with SSOAD exhibit a broad phenotypic spectrum involving short stature associated with advanced bone maturation and early-onset osteoarthritis (OA), as well as mild dysmorphic features consisting of midface hypoplasia, brachydactyly, broad great toes, and lumbar lordosis. Other features include intervertebral disc disease and osteochondritis dissecans, which is characterized by separation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone from the articular surface. Phenotypes are highly variable even among patients within the same family, and there are no apparent genotype-phenotype correlations (Dateki et al., 2017). The term 'dissecans' comes from 'dis' meaning 'from' and 'secare' meaning 'cut off,' and is not to be confused with 'desiccans' derived from 'desiccare' meaning to 'dry up.' Dissecans refers to the appearance of part of the bone having been cut away.
Developmental dysplasia of the hip 2
MedGen UID:
811575
Concept ID:
C3715079
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a debilitating condition characterized by incomplete formation of the acetabulum leading to dislocation of the femur, suboptimal joint function, and accelerated wear of the articular cartilage, resulting in arthritis. Undetected hip dysplasia is the leading cause of osteoarthritis of the hip in young individuals, causing over 40% of cases in that age group (summary by Feldman et al., 2013). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of developmental dysplasia of the hip, see DDH1 (142700).
Osteoarthritis susceptibility 1
MedGen UID:
854604
Concept ID:
C3887876
Finding
Osteoarthritis is a common disease of the joints that primarily occurs in older adults. This condition is characterized by the breakdown of cartilage, the tough but flexible tissue that covers the ends of the bones at the joints and allows smooth joint movements. One or more parts of the body can be affected, most often the hands, shoulders, spine, knees, or hips.\n\nOsteoarthritis usually develops slowly, causing pain, stiffness, and restricted movement as the condition gets worse. Areas of bone no longer cushioned by cartilage rub against each other and start to break down. Further damage is caused as the body attempts to repair and rebuild these tissues. The immune system, which plays a role in healing injuries, targets these areas, and its response leads to inflammation of the joint tissues. Abnormal growths of bone (osteophytes) and other tissue can also occur, and may be visible as enlarged joints. Enlargement of the joints of the fingers is especially noticeable.\n\nPeople with osteoarthritis typically experience stiffness following periods of inactivity such as upon awakening or rising from a chair; the stiffness usually improves as they move around. In some affected individuals, the condition never causes major problems. In others, severe osteoarthritis can impair mobility and the ability to perform daily tasks, affecting quality of life and increasing the risk of other health conditions such as cardiovascular disease.\n\nOsteoarthritis is most common in middle age or late adulthood, because the cartilage at the joints naturally begins to thin as people age. However, it can occur earlier in life, especially after injuries affecting the joints such as a type of knee injury called an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. People who are overweight or whose activities are particularly stressful to the joints are also at increased risk of developing osteoarthritis.
Peripheral dysostosis
MedGen UID:
1648357
Concept ID:
C4721502
Disease or Syndrome
A rare primary bone dysplasia with characteristics of cone-shaped epiphyses of the phalanges, hyperextensibility and hyper-flexibility of the fingers and marked delay in ossification of hand bones. Short-limbed short stature, very stubby, short fingers and toes, flat face and nose and a large skull may also be associated. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1980.
Loeys-Dietz syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
1794251
Concept ID:
C5562041
Disease or Syndrome
Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

van Doormaal MCM, Meerhoff GA, Vliet Vlieland TPM, Peter WF
Musculoskeletal Care 2020 Dec;18(4):575-595. Epub 2020 Jul 9 doi: 10.1002/msc.1492. PMID: 32643252
Skou ST, Roos EM
Clin Exp Rheumatol 2019 Sep-Oct;37 Suppl 120(5):112-117. Epub 2019 Oct 15 PMID: 31621559
Bartels EM, Juhl CB, Christensen R, Hagen KB, Danneskiold-Samsøe B, Dagfinrud H, Lund H
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016 Mar 23;3(3):CD005523. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005523.pub3. PMID: 27007113Free PMC Article

Curated

UK NICE Guideline NG226, Osteoarthritis in over 16s: diagnosis and management, 2022

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Nouri F, Babaee M, Peydayesh P, Esmaily H, Raeissadat SA
BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2022 Sep 12;23(1):856. doi: 10.1186/s12891-022-05787-8. PMID: 36096771Free PMC Article
Lespasio MJ, Sultan AA, Piuzzi NS, Khlopas A, Husni ME, Muschler GF, Mont MA
Perm J 2018;22:17-084. doi: 10.7812/TPP/17-084. PMID: 29309269Free PMC Article
Murphy NJ, Eyles JP, Hunter DJ
Adv Ther 2016 Nov;33(11):1921-1946. Epub 2016 Sep 26 doi: 10.1007/s12325-016-0409-3. PMID: 27671326Free PMC Article
Krauß I, Steinhilber B, Haupt G, Miller R, Martus P, Janßen P
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2014 Sep 1;111(35-36):592-9. doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2014.0592. PMID: 25249361Free PMC Article
Bennell K
J Physiother 2013 Sep;59(3):145-57. doi: 10.1016/S1836-9553(13)70179-6. PMID: 23896330

Diagnosis

Hall M, van der Esch M, Hinman RS, Peat G, de Zwart A, Quicke JG, Runhaar J, Knoop J, van der Leeden M, de Rooij M, Meulenbelt I, Vliet Vlieland T, Lems WF, Holden MA, Foster NE, Bennell KL
Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2022 Jan;30(1):32-41. Epub 2021 Sep 29 doi: 10.1016/j.joca.2021.09.010. PMID: 34600121
Lespasio MJ, Sultan AA, Piuzzi NS, Khlopas A, Husni ME, Muschler GF, Mont MA
Perm J 2018;22:17-084. doi: 10.7812/TPP/17-084. PMID: 29309269Free PMC Article
Cibulka MT, Bloom NJ, Enseki KR, Macdonald CW, Woehrle J, McDonough CM
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017 Jun;47(6):A1-A37. doi: 10.2519/jospt.2017.0301. PMID: 28566053
Murphy NJ, Eyles JP, Hunter DJ
Adv Ther 2016 Nov;33(11):1921-1946. Epub 2016 Sep 26 doi: 10.1007/s12325-016-0409-3. PMID: 27671326Free PMC Article
Aresti N, Kassam J, Nicholas N, Achan P
BMJ 2016 Jul 6;354:i3405. doi: 10.1136/bmj.i3405. PMID: 27383835

Therapy

Zhang Y, Wang C
Curr Rheumatol Rep 2020 Sep 25;22(11):80. doi: 10.1007/s11926-020-00954-z. PMID: 32978666Free PMC Article
Goh SL, Persson MSM, Stocks J, Hou Y, Lin J, Hall MC, Doherty M, Zhang W
Ann Phys Rehabil Med 2019 Sep;62(5):356-365. Epub 2019 May 21 doi: 10.1016/j.rehab.2019.04.006. PMID: 31121333Free PMC Article
Hunter DJ, Bierma-Zeinstra S
Lancet 2019 Apr 27;393(10182):1745-1759. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30417-9. PMID: 31034380
Bennell KL, Hunter DJ, Paterson KL
Curr Rheumatol Rep 2017 May;19(5):24. doi: 10.1007/s11926-017-0652-x. PMID: 28386761
Bartels EM, Juhl CB, Christensen R, Hagen KB, Danneskiold-Samsøe B, Dagfinrud H, Lund H
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016 Mar 23;3(3):CD005523. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005523.pub3. PMID: 27007113Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Pincus D, Jenkinson R, Paterson M, Leroux T, Ravi B
JAMA 2020 Mar 17;323(11):1070-1076. doi: 10.1001/jama.2020.0785. PMID: 32181847Free PMC Article
Wylie JD, Peters CL, Aoki SK
J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2018 Aug 1;26(15):515-525. doi: 10.5435/JAAOS-D-16-00532. PMID: 29939866
Umpierres CS, Ribeiro TA, Marchisio ÂE, Galvão L, Borges ÍN, Macedo CA, Galia CR
J Rehabil Res Dev 2014;51(10):1567-78. doi: 10.1682/JRRD.2014.05.0132. PMID: 25856757
Busija L, Bridgett L, Williams SR, Osborne RH, Buchbinder R, March L, Fransen M
Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol 2010 Dec;24(6):757-68. doi: 10.1016/j.berh.2010.11.001. PMID: 21665124
D'Ambrosia RD
Orthopedics 2005 Feb;28(2 Suppl):s201-5. doi: 10.3928/0147-7447-20050202-04. PMID: 15747607

Clinical prediction guides

Yuan J, Wang D, Zhang Y, Dou Q
Eat Weight Disord 2023 Feb 15;28(1):11. doi: 10.1007/s40519-023-01538-3. PMID: 36790552Free PMC Article
Iagnocco A, Naredo E
Clin Exp Rheumatol 2017 May-Jun;35(3):527-534. Epub 2017 Feb 10 PMID: 28229810
Di Pietto F, Chianca V, de Ritis R, Cesarano E, Reginelli A, Barile A, Zappia M, Ginolfi L
Musculoskelet Surg 2017 Mar;101(Suppl 1):43-49. Epub 2017 Feb 16 doi: 10.1007/s12306-017-0459-y. PMID: 28210944
Umpierres CS, Ribeiro TA, Marchisio ÂE, Galvão L, Borges ÍN, Macedo CA, Galia CR
J Rehabil Res Dev 2014;51(10):1567-78. doi: 10.1682/JRRD.2014.05.0132. PMID: 25856757
Bennell KL, Egerton T, Martin J, Abbott JH, Metcalf B, McManus F, Sims K, Pua YH, Wrigley TV, Forbes A, Smith C, Harris A, Buchbinder R
JAMA 2014 May 21;311(19):1987-97. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.4591. PMID: 24846036

Recent systematic reviews

Gibbs AJ, Gray B, Wallis JA, Taylor NF, Kemp JL, Hunter DJ, Barton CJ
Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2023 Oct;31(10):1280-1292. Epub 2023 Jun 30 doi: 10.1016/j.joca.2023.05.015. PMID: 37394226
Runge N, Aina A, May S
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2022 Oct;52(10):675-A13. Epub 2022 Jul 26 doi: 10.2519/jospt.2022.11062. PMID: 35881705
van Doormaal MCM, Meerhoff GA, Vliet Vlieland TPM, Peter WF
Musculoskeletal Care 2020 Dec;18(4):575-595. Epub 2020 Jul 9 doi: 10.1002/msc.1492. PMID: 32643252
Goh SL, Persson MSM, Stocks J, Hou Y, Lin J, Hall MC, Doherty M, Zhang W
Ann Phys Rehabil Med 2019 Sep;62(5):356-365. Epub 2019 May 21 doi: 10.1016/j.rehab.2019.04.006. PMID: 31121333Free PMC Article
Bartels EM, Juhl CB, Christensen R, Hagen KB, Danneskiold-Samsøe B, Dagfinrud H, Lund H
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016 Mar 23;3(3):CD005523. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005523.pub3. PMID: 27007113Free PMC Article

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      See practice and clinical guidelines in NCBI Bookshelf. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.

    Curated

    • NICE, 2022
      UK NICE Guideline NG226, Osteoarthritis in over 16s: diagnosis and management, 2022

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