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1.

Noonan syndrome 1

Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1638960
Concept ID:
C4551602
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 11

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
351237
Concept ID:
C1864850
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 8

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
336069
Concept ID:
C1843896
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 10

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
347543
Concept ID:
C1857777
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 12

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
409749
Concept ID:
C1969081
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Naxos disease

Naxos disease (NXD) is characterized by arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy associated with abnormalities of the skin, hair, and nails. The ectodermal features are evident from birth or early childhood, whereas the cardiac symptoms develop in young adulthood or later. Clinical variability of ectodermal features has been observed, with hair anomalies ranging from woolly hair to alopecia, and skin abnormalities ranging from mild focal palmoplantar keratoderma to generalized skin fragility or even lethal neonatal epidermolysis bullosa (Protonotarios et al., 1986; Cabral et al., 2010; Pigors et al., 2011; Erken et al., 2011; Sen-Chowdhry and McKenna, 2014). Another syndrome involving cardiomyopathy, woolly hair, and keratoderma (DCWHK; 605676) is caused by mutation in the desmoplakin gene (DSP; 125647). Also see 610476 for a similar disorder caused by homozygous mutation in the DSC2 gene (125645). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
321991
Concept ID:
C1832600
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy with wooly hair and keratoderma

Dilated cardiomyopathy with woolly hair and keratoderma (DCWHK) is characterized by the presence of woolly or sparse hair from birth. Some patients exhibit fragile skin with blisters/erosions after minor mechanical trauma, with hyperkeratosis and epidermolytic keratoderma developing in early childhood. Cardiomyopathy may become apparent in the first decade of life, and early death due to heart failure has been reported, but patients may remain asymptomatic into the fourth decade of life. Some patients exhibit an arrhythmogenic form of cardiomyopathy, with sudden death in early adulthood (Carvajal-Huerta, 1998; Whittock et al., 2002; Alcalai et al., 2003; Uzumcu et al., 2006). Another syndrome involving cardiomyopathy, woolly hair, and keratoderma (Naxos disease; 601214) is caused by mutation in the plakoglobin gene (JUP; 173325). Also see 610476 for a similar disorder caused by homozygous mutation in the DSC2 gene (125645). Dilated cardiomyopathy with woolly hair, keratoderma, and tooth agenesis (DCWHKTA; 615821) is caused by heterozygous mutation in DSP. An isolated form of striated PPK (PPKS2; 612908) is also caused by heterozygous mutation in DSP. Reviews In a review of cardiocutaneous syndromes and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, Sen-Chowdhry and McKenna (2014) stated that although the cardiac component of Carvajal syndrome was originally considered dilated cardiomyopathy, many of its features resemble those of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (see 607450). In addition, they noted that different disease subtypes have been found to coexist within the same kindred, suggesting a role for modifier genes and/or environmental influences. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
340124
Concept ID:
C1854063
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Trichohepatoenteric syndrome 1

Trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES), generally considered to be a neonatal enteropathy, is characterized by intractable diarrhea (seen in almost all affected children), woolly hair (seen in all), intrauterine growth restriction, facial dysmorphism, and short stature. Additional findings include poorly characterized immunodeficiency, recurrent infections, skin abnormalities, and liver disease. Mild intellectual disability (ID) is seen in about 50% of affected individuals. Less common findings include congenital heart defects and platelet anomalies. To date 52 affected individuals have been reported. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1644087
Concept ID:
C4551982
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Cardiomyopathy, dilated, with wooly hair, keratoderma, and tooth agenesis

Keratoderma with woolly hair is a group of related conditions that affect the skin and hair and in many cases increase the risk of potentially life-threatening heart problems. People with these conditions have hair that is unusually coarse, dry, fine, and tightly curled. In some cases, the hair is also sparse. The woolly hair texture typically affects only scalp hair and is present from birth. Starting early in life, affected individuals also develop palmoplantar keratoderma, a condition that causes skin on the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet to become thick, scaly, and calloused.

Keratoderma with woolly hair comprises several related conditions with overlapping signs and symptoms. Researchers have recently proposed classifying keratoderma with woolly hair into four types, based on the underlying genetic cause. Type I, also known as Naxos disease, is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma, woolly hair, and a form of cardiomyopathy called arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Type II, also known as Carvajal syndrome, has hair and skin abnormalities similar to type I but features a different form of cardiomyopathy, called dilated left ventricular cardiomyopathy. Type III also has signs and symptoms similar to those of type I, including ARVC, although the hair and skin abnormalities are often milder. Type IV is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly and sparse hair, as well as abnormal fingernails and toenails. Type IV does not appear to cause cardiomyopathy.

Cardiomyopathy, which is a disease of the heart muscle, is a life-threatening health problem that can develop in people with keratoderma with woolly hair. Unlike the other features of this condition, signs and symptoms of cardiomyopathy may not appear until adolescence or later. Complications of cardiomyopathy can include an abnormal heartbeat (arrhythmia), heart failure, and sudden death. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
862830
Concept ID:
C4014393
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Autosomal dominant wooly hair

Woolly hair (WH) refers to a group of hair shaft disorders that are characterized by fine and tightly curled hair. Compared to normal curly hair that is observed in some populations, WH grows slowly and stops growing after a few inches. Under light microscopy, WH shows some structural anomalies, including trichorrhexis nodosa and tapered ends. WH can appear as part of several syndromes, such as Naxos disease (601214) and cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (115150) (summary by Petukhova et al., 2009). See 278150 for a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive woolly hair. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
348571
Concept ID:
C1860238
Finding
11.

Trichothiodystrophy 4, nonphotosensitive

Trichothiodystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which patients have brittle, sulfur-deficient hair that displays a diagnostic alternating light and dark banding pattern, called 'tiger tail banding,' under polarizing microscopy. TTD patients display a wide variety of clinical features, including cutaneous, neurologic, and growth abnormalities. Common additional clinical features are ichthyosis, intellectual/developmental disabilities, decreased fertility, abnormal characteristics at birth, ocular abnormalities, short stature, and infections. There are both photosensitive and nonphotosensitive forms of the disorder (summary by Faghri et al., 2008). Sabinas brittle hair syndrome (211390) is another form of nonphotosensitive TTD. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of trichothiodystrophy, see 601675. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
272036
Concept ID:
C1313961
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Trichohepatoenteric syndrome 2

Trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES), generally considered to be a neonatal enteropathy, is characterized by intractable diarrhea (seen in almost all affected children), woolly hair (seen in all), intrauterine growth restriction, facial dysmorphism, and short stature. Additional findings include poorly characterized immunodeficiency, recurrent infections, skin abnormalities, and liver disease. Mild intellectual disability (ID) is seen in about 50% of affected individuals. Less common findings include congenital heart defects and platelet anomalies. To date 52 affected individuals have been reported. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
482919
Concept ID:
C3281289
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Hypotrichosis 8

Hypotrichosis simplex refers to a group of hereditary isolated alopecias characterized by diffuse and progressive hair loss, usually beginning in early childhood (Pasternack et al., 2008). Localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis (LAH) is characterized by fragile hairs that break easily, leaving short, sparse scalp hairs. The disorder affects the trunk and extremities as well as the scalp, and the eyebrows and eyelashes may also be involved, whereas beard, pubic, and axillary hairs are largely spared. In addition, patients can develop hyperkeratotic follicular papules, erythema, and pruritus in affected areas (summary by Schaffer et al., 2006). Woolly hair (WH) refers to a group of hair shaft disorders that are characterized by fine and tightly curled hair. Compared to normal curly hair that is observed in some populations, WH grows slowly and stops growing after a few inches. Under light microscopy, WH shows some structural anomalies, including trichorrhexis nodosa and tapered ends (summary by Petukhova et al., 2009). Several families have been reported in which some affected individuals exhibit features of hypotrichosis and others have woolly scalp hair (Khan et al., 2011). Woolly hair is also a feature of several syndromes, such as Naxos disease (601214) and cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (115150) (Petukhova et al., 2009), or the palmoplantar keratoderma and cardiomyopathy syndrome (601214) (Carvajal-Huerta, 1998). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hypotrichosis and Woolly Hair For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nonsyndromic hypotrichosis, see HYPT1 (605389). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of localized hypotrichosis, see LAH1 (HYPT6; 607903). Another form of autosomal recessive woolly hair with or without hypotrichosis (ARWH2; 604379) is caused by mutation in the LIPH gene (607365) and is allelic to autosomal recessive localized hypotrichosis (LAH2). ARWH3 (616760) is caused by mutation in the KRT25 gene (616646) on chromosome 17q21. An autosomal dominant form of woolly hair with hypotrichosis (HYPT13; 615896) is caused by mutation in the KRT71 gene (608245) on chromosome 12q13. Another autosomal dominant form of woolly hair (ADWH; 194300) with normal hair density is caused by mutation in the KRT74 gene (608248) on chromosome 12q13, and is allelic to an autosomal dominant form of hypotrichosis simplex of the scalp (HYPT3; 613981) as well as an ectodermal dysplasia of the hair/nail type (ECTD7; 614929). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
481100
Concept ID:
C3279470
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hypotrichosis 7

Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis is a condition that affects hair growth. People with this condition have sparse hair (hypotrichosis) on the scalp beginning in infancy. This hair is usually coarse, dry, and tightly curled (often described as woolly hair). Scalp hair may also be lighter in color than expected and is fragile and easily broken. Affected individuals often cannot grow hair longer than a few inches. The eyebrows, eyelashes, and other body hair may be sparse as well. Over time, the hair problems can remain stable or progress to complete scalp hair loss (alopecia) and a decrease in body hair.

Rarely, people with autosomal recessive hypotrichosis have skin problems affecting areas with sparse hair, such as redness (erythema), itchiness (pruritus), or missing patches of skin (erosions) on the scalp. In areas of poor hair growth, they may also develop bumps called hyperkeratotic follicular papules that develop around hair follicles, which are specialized structures in the skin where hair growth occurs. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
322969
Concept ID:
C1836672
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Wooly hair-palmoplantar keratoderma syndrome

Palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair (PPKWH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the presence of these cardinal features and the absence of cardiomyopathy symptoms or findings on echocardiography and electrocardiogram. Palmoplantar keratoderma is of the striate type; hair is generally sparse; and leukonychia is present (Ramot et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
863639
Concept ID:
C4015202
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Hypotrichosis 13

Any hypotrichosis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the KRT71 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
863053
Concept ID:
C4014616
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Neurodevelopmental disorder with cerebral atrophy and variable facial dysmorphism

Neurodevelopmental disorder with cerebral atrophy and facial dysmorphism (NEDCAFD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent from birth. Affected individuals have hypotonia with inability to walk and severely impaired intellectual development with absent language. Most patients have variable dysmorphic facial features including prominent eyes, protruding and low-set ears, and thin upper lip. Brain imaging shows cerebral atrophy, corpus callosum hypoplasia, and a simplified gyral pattern (summary by Rasheed et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1786662
Concept ID:
C5543228
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Trichothiodystrophy 8, nonphotosensitive

Nonphotosensitive trichothiodystrophy-8 (TTD8) is characterized by brittle hair and nails and scaly skin, accompanied by failure to thrive, microcephaly, and neuromotor developmental delay. Hair analysis shows low sulfur content, and skin fibroblasts demonstrate normal DNA repair efficiency after UV irradiation (Botta et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of trichothiodystrophy, see TTD1 (601675). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794267
Concept ID:
C5562057
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Olmsted syndrome 2

Olmsted syndrome-2 (OLMS2) is characterized by mutilating hyperkeratotic skin lesions, primarily on the palms and soles, but also extending onto dorsal surfaces of the hands and feet and distal extremities. The lesions are progressive, becoming thicker with verrucous fissures on the palms and soles over time. In addition, affected individuals exhibit perioral hyperkeratosis, and may have lesions around other orifices as well, such as the nostrils, perineum, and anus. Most patients also have hyperkeratotic nails and light-colored woolly hair (Duchatelet et al., 2019). Some patients may experience flexion contractures of the digits due to the severity of the keratoderma, and intractable pruritus and alopecia universalis have been observed (Dai et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Olmsted disease, see OLMS1 (614594). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1779902
Concept ID:
C5543096
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Erythrokeratodermia variabilis et progressiva 7

Erythrokeratodermia variabilis et progressiva-7 (EKVP7) is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma that extends to the dorsal surface of the hands and feet (transgrediens), as well as erythematous annular skin lesions. Pruritis, woolly hair, and dystrophic nails may also be present (Duchatelet et al., 2019; Patel et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EKVP, see EKVP1 (133200). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1780408
Concept ID:
C5543106
Disease or Syndrome
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