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Hypoplasia of the radius

MedGen UID:
672334
Concept ID:
C0685381
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: Hypoplastic radii; Hypoplastic radius; Radial hypoplasia; Short radii; Short radius
SNOMED CT: Congenital hypoplasia of radius (93288001); Congenital short radius (93288001); Hypoplasia of radius (205170001)
 
HPO: HP:0002984

Definition

Underdevelopment of the radius. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVHypoplasia of the radius

Conditions with this feature

Radial aplasia-thrombocytopenia syndrome
MedGen UID:
61235
Concept ID:
C0175703
Disease or Syndrome
Thrombocytopenia absent radius (TAR) syndrome is characterized by bilateral absence of the radii with the presence of both thumbs, and thrombocytopenia that is generally transient. Thrombocytopenia may be congenital or may develop within the first few weeks to months of life; in general, thrombocytopenic episodes decrease with age. Cow's milk allergy is common and can be associated with exacerbation of thrombocytopenia. Other anomalies of the skeleton (upper and lower limbs, ribs, and vertebrae), heart, and genitourinary system (renal anomalies and agenesis of uterus, cervix, and upper part of the vagina) can occur.
Nager syndrome
MedGen UID:
120519
Concept ID:
C0265245
Disease or Syndrome
Nager syndrome is the prototype for a group of disorders collectively referred to as the acrofacial dysostoses (AFDs), which are characterized by malformation of the craniofacial skeleton and the limbs. The major facial features of Nager syndrome include downslanted palpebral fissures, midface retrusion, and micrognathia, the latter of which often requires the placement of a tracheostomy in early childhood. Limb defects typically involve the anterior (radial) elements of the upper limbs and manifest as small or absent thumbs, triphalangeal thumbs, radial hypoplasia or aplasia, and radioulnar synostosis. Phocomelia of the upper limbs and, occasionally, lower-limb defects have also been reported. The presence of anterior upper-limb defects and the typical lack of lower-limb involvement distinguishes Nager syndrome from Miller syndrome (263750), another rare AFD; however, distinguishing Nager syndrome from other AFDs, including Miller syndrome, can be challenging (summary by Bernier et al., 2012).
Miller syndrome
MedGen UID:
120522
Concept ID:
C0265257
Disease or Syndrome
Miller syndrome, or postaxial acrofacial dysostosis, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized clinically by severe micrognathia, cleft lip and/or palate, hypoplasia or aplasia of the postaxial elements of the limbs, coloboma of the eyelids, and supernumerary nipples (summary by Ng et al., 2010).
Grebe syndrome
MedGen UID:
75557
Concept ID:
C0265260
Disease or Syndrome
Acromesomelic dysplasia-2A (AMD2A), or Grebe chondrodysplasia, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe abnormality of the limbs and limb joints. The severity of limb shortening progresses in a proximal-distal gradient, with the hands and feet being most affected. The fingers and toes lack articulation and appear as skin appendages. In contrast, axial skeletal structures and the craniofacial skeleton are not affected. Heterozygous individuals are of average stature and have mild skeletal abnormalities (summary by Thomas et al., 1997). Because Grebe syndrome exhibits increasing severity in a proximal-distal gradient, it is classified as a form of acromesomelic dysplasia (Costa et al., 1998). For discussion of the genetic heterogeneity of acromesomelic dysplasia, see AMD1 (602875).
Holt-Oram syndrome
MedGen UID:
120524
Concept ID:
C0265264
Disease or Syndrome
Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) is characterized by upper-limb defects, congenital heart malformation, and cardiac conduction disease. Upper-limb malformations may be unilateral, bilateral/symmetric, or bilateral/asymmetric and can range from triphalangeal or absent thumb(s) to phocomelia. Other upper-limb malformations can include unequal arm length caused by aplasia or hypoplasia of the radius, fusion or anomalous development of the carpal and thenar bones, abnormal forearm pronation and supination, abnormal opposition of the thumb, sloping shoulders, and restriction of shoulder joint movement. An abnormal carpal bone is present in all affected individuals and may be the only evidence of disease. A congenital heart malformation is present in 75% of individuals with HOS and most commonly involves the septum. Atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect can vary in number, size, and location. Complex congenital heart malformations can also occur in individuals with HOS. Individuals with HOS with or without a congenital heart malformation are at risk for cardiac conduction disease. While individuals may present at birth with sinus bradycardia and first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block, AV block can progress unpredictably to a higher grade including complete heart block with and without atrial fibrillation.
Achondrogenesis, type IA
MedGen UID:
78546
Concept ID:
C0265273
Congenital Abnormality
The term achondrogenesis has been used to characterize the most severe forms of chondrodysplasia in humans, invariably lethal before or shortly after birth. Achondrogenesis type I is a severe chondrodystrophy characterized radiographically by deficient ossification in the lumbar vertebrae and absent ossification in the sacral, pubic and ischial bones and clinically by stillbirth or early death (Maroteaux and Lamy, 1968; Langer et al., 1969). In addition to severe micromelia, there is a disproportionately large cranium due to marked edema of soft tissues. Classification of Achondrogenesis Achondrogenesis was traditionally divided into 2 types: type I (Parenti-Fraccaro) and type II (Langer-Saldino). Borochowitz et al. (1988) suggested that achondrogenesis type I of Parenti-Fraccaro should be classified into 2 distinct disorders: type IA, corresponding to the cases originally published by Houston et al. (1972) and Harris et al. (1972), and type IB (600972), corresponding to the case originally published by Fraccaro (1952). Analysis of the case reported by Parenti (1936) by Borochowitz et al. (1988) suggested the diagnosis of achondrogenesis type II, i.e., the Langer-Saldino type (200610). Type IA would be classified as lethal achondrogenesis, Houston-Harris type; type IB, lethal achondrogenesis, Fraccaro type; and type II, lethal achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis, Langer-Saldino type. Superti-Furga (1996) suggested that hypochondrogenesis should be considered separately from achondrogenesis type II because the phenotype can be much milder. Genetic Heterogeneity of Achondrogenesis Achondrogenesis type IB (ACG1B; 600972) is caused by mutation in the DTDST gene (606718), and achondrogenesis type II (ACG2; 200610) is caused by mutation in the COL2A1 gene (120140).
Baller-Gerold syndrome
MedGen UID:
120532
Concept ID:
C0265308
Disease or Syndrome
Baller-Gerold syndrome (BGS) can be suspected at birth in an infant with craniosynostosis and upper limb abnormality. The coronal suture is most commonly affected; the metopic, lambdoid, and sagittal sutures may also be involved alone or in combination. Upper limb abnormality can include a combination of thumb hypo- or aplasia and radial hypo- or aplasia and may be asymmetric. Malformation or absence of carpal or metacarpal bones has also been described. Skin lesions may appear anytime within the first few years after birth, typically beginning with erythema of the face and extremities and evolving into poikiloderma. Slow growth is apparent in infancy with eventual height and length typically at 4 SD below the mean.
Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis
MedGen UID:
75562
Concept ID:
C0265309
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of SHOX deficiency disorders, caused by haploinsufficiency of the short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX), ranges from Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) at the severe end of the spectrum to nonspecific short stature at the mild end of the spectrum. In adults with SHOX deficiency, the proportion of LWD versus short stature without features of LWD is not well defined. In LWD the classic clinical triad is short stature, mesomelia, and Madelung deformity. Mesomelia, in which the middle portion of a limb is shortened in relation to the proximal portion, can be evident first in school-aged children and increases with age in frequency and severity. Madelung deformity (abnormal alignment of the radius, ulna, and carpal bones at the wrist) typically develops in mid-to-late childhood and is more common and severe in females. The phenotype of short stature caused by SHOX deficiency in the absence of mesomelia and Madelung deformity (called SHOX-deficient short stature in this GeneReview) is highly variable, even within the same family.
Langer mesomelic dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
96585
Concept ID:
C0432230
Disease or Syndrome
Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD) is characterized by severe limb aplasia or severe hypoplasia of the ulna and fibula, and a thickened and curved radius and tibia. These changes can result in displacement deformities of the hands and feet. Hypoplasia of the mandible is also observed (Langer, 1967). See also Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (127300), a less severe phenotype that results from heterozygous defect in the SHOX or SHOXY genes.
Oculootoradial syndrome
MedGen UID:
233003
Concept ID:
C1327918
Disease or Syndrome
IVIC syndrome (IVIC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by upper limb anomalies (radial ray defects, carpal bone fusion), extraocular motor disturbances, and congenital bilateral nonprogressive mixed hearing loss. More variable features include heart involvement, mild thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis (before age 50), shoulder girdle hypoplasia, imperforate anus, kidney malrotation, and rectovaginal fistula (summary by Paradisi and Arias, 2007).
Duane-radial ray syndrome
MedGen UID:
301647
Concept ID:
C1623209
Disease or Syndrome
SALL4-related disorders include Duane-radial ray syndrome (DRRS, Okihiro syndrome), acro-renal-ocular syndrome (AROS), and SALL4-related Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) – three phenotypes previously thought to be distinct entities. DRRS is characterized by uni- or bilateral Duane anomaly and radial ray malformation that can include thenar hypoplasia and/or hypoplasia or aplasia of the thumbs, hypoplasia or aplasia of the radii, shortening and radial deviation of the forearms, triphalangeal thumbs, and duplication of the thumb (preaxial polydactyly). AROS is characterized by radial ray malformations, renal abnormalities (mild malrotation, ectopia, horseshoe kidney, renal hypoplasia, vesicoureteral reflux, bladder diverticula), ocular coloboma, and Duane anomaly. Rarely, pathogenic variants in SALL4 may cause clinically typical HOS (i.e., radial ray malformations and cardiac malformations without additional features).
Fanconi anemia complementation group N
MedGen UID:
372133
Concept ID:
C1835817
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Fanconi anemia complementation group I
MedGen UID:
323016
Concept ID:
C1836861
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
TARP syndrome
MedGen UID:
333324
Concept ID:
C1839463
Disease or Syndrome
The classic features of TARP syndrome are talipes equinovarus, atrial septal defect, Robin sequence (micrognathia, cleft palate, and glossoptosis), and persistent left superior vena cava. Not all patients have all classic features. Some patients have the additional features of central nervous system dysfunction, renal abnormalities, variable cardiac anomalies including hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, and variable distal limb defects including syndactyly. Most patients die in late prenatal or early postnatal stages (summary by Kaeppler et al., 2018).
Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia
MedGen UID:
334681
Concept ID:
C1843096
Disease or Syndrome
Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia (ACFD) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by postnatal-onset disproportionate short stature, relatively large head, narrow thorax, lumbar lordosis, short limbs, and brachydactyly with small broad nails (Ozyavuz Cubuk and Duz, 2021).
Schinzel phocomelia syndrome
MedGen UID:
336388
Concept ID:
C1848651
Disease or Syndrome
The Al-Awadi/Raas-Rothschild/Schinzel phocomelia syndrome (AARRS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe malformations of upper and lower limbs with severely hypoplastic pelvis and abnormal genitalia. The disorder is believed to represent a defect of dorsoventral patterning and outgrowth of limbs (summary by Kantaputra et al., 2010).
Richieri Costa-Pereira syndrome
MedGen UID:
336581
Concept ID:
C1849348
Disease or Syndrome
Patients with Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome display a pattern of anomalies consisting of microstomia, micrognathia, abnormal fusion of the mandible, cleft palate/Robin sequence, absence of lower central incisors, minor ear anomalies, hypoplastic first ray, abnormal tibiae, hypoplastic halluces, and clubfeet. Learning disability is also a common finding (summary by Favaro et al., 2011).
Fuhrmann syndrome
MedGen UID:
346429
Concept ID:
C1856728
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has main characteristics of bowing of the femora, aplasia or hypoplasia of the fibulae and poly, oligo and syndactyly. It has been reported in 11 patients. Most of the patients also had a hypoplastic pelvis and hypoplasia of the fingers and fingernails. Some had congenital dislocation of the hip, absence or fusion of tarsal bones, absence of various metatarsals and hypoplasia and aplasia of the toes. The syndrome is caused by a partial loss of WNT7A function (gene mapped to 3p25).
Lethal faciocardiomelic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
384007
Concept ID:
C1856891
Disease or Syndrome
Lethal faciocardiomelic dysplasia is an extremely rare polymalformative syndrome. It was described only once, in 1975, in 3 affected males in a sibship of 13, from second-cousin parents. Patients were all of low birth weight, had microretrognathia, microstomia, and microglossia, hypoplasia of the radius and ulna with radial deviation of the hands, simian creases and hypoplasia of fingers I and V, hypoplasia of the fibula and tibia with talipes and wide space between toes I and II, and severe malformation of the left heart which may have been responsible for death of all 3 in the first week or so of life.
Cenani-Lenz syndactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
395226
Concept ID:
C1859309
Disease or Syndrome
Cenani-Lenz syndactyly syndrome (CLSS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mainly by anomalies of distal limb development, with fusion and disorganization of metacarpal and phalangeal bones, radius and ulnar shortening, radioulnar synostosis, and severe syndactyly of hands and feet. Mild facial dysmorphism is present in most patients. Kidney anomalies, including renal agenesis and hypoplasia, occur in over half of patients (summary by Li et al., 2010).
Acro-renal-mandibular syndrome
MedGen UID:
395425
Concept ID:
C1860166
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with characteristics of limb deficiencies and renal anomalies that include split hand-split foot malformation, renal agenesis, polycystic kidneys, uterine anomalies and severe mandibular hypoplasia.
Osebold-Remondini syndrome
MedGen UID:
350598
Concept ID:
C1862130
Disease or Syndrome
The Osebold-Remondini syndrome is a bone dysplasia with mesomelic shortness of limbs and, hence, shortness of stature, absence or hypoplasia of second phalanges with synostosis of the remaining phalanges, carpal and tarsal coalitions, and apparently no other anomalies (summary by Opitz and Gilbert, 1985). See 602875 for a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive acromesomelic dysplasia.
Arms, malformation of
MedGen UID:
350694
Concept ID:
C1862534
Congenital Abnormality
Acromesomelic dysplasia 1, Maroteaux type
MedGen UID:
355199
Concept ID:
C1864356
Disease or Syndrome
The acromesomelic dysplasias are disorders in which there is disproportionate shortening of skeletal elements, predominantly affecting the middle segments (forearms and forelegs) and distal segments (hands and feet) of the appendicular skeleton. Acromesomelic dysplasia-1 (AMD1) is characterized by severe dwarfism (height below 120 cm) with shortening of the middle and distal segments of the limbs. This condition is usually diagnosed at birth and becomes more obvious in the first 2 years of life. X-rays show short broad fingers, square flat feet, and shortening of the long bones (particularly the forearms). The radius is bowed; the ulna is shorter than the radius, and its distal end is occasionally hypoplastic. The skull is dolichocephalic and a shortness of the trunk, with decreased vertebral height and narrowing of the lumbar interpedicular distances, is consistently observed. Facial appearance and intelligence are normal (summary by Faivre et al., 2000). Genetic Heterogeneity of Acromesomelic Dysplasia Additional autosomal recessive forms of acromesomelic dysplasia include acromesomelic dysplasia-2A (200700), -2B (228900), and -2C (201250), all caused by mutation in the GDF5 gene (601146) on chromosome 20q11; AMD3 (200700), caused by mutation in the BMPR1B gene (603248) on chromosome 4q22; and AMD4 (619636), caused by mutation in the PRKG2 gene (601591) on chromosome 4q21. An autosomal dominant form of acromesomelic dysplasia has also been reported (see 112910).
Brachyphalangy, polydactyly, and tibial aplasia/hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
355340
Concept ID:
C1864965
Disease or Syndrome
Weyers ulnar ray/oligodactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
356030
Concept ID:
C1865566
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly-radial heart renal anomalies syndrome
MedGen UID:
401047
Concept ID:
C1866649
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has characteristics of holoprosencephaly, predominantly radial limb deficiency (absent thumbs, phocomelia), heart defects, kidney malformations and absence of gallbladder. It has been described in two families (with at least seven affected persons). Variable manifestations include vertebral anomalies, cleft lip/palate, microphthalmia, absent nose, dysplastic ears, hearing loss, colobomas of the iris and retina and/or bifid uvula. Inheritance is likely to be autosomal dominant with variable expressivity.
Ulnar-mammary syndrome
MedGen UID:
357886
Concept ID:
C1866994
Disease or Syndrome
Ulnar-mammary syndrome (UMS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by posterior limb deficiencies or duplications, apocrine/mammary gland hypoplasia and/or dysfunction, abnormal dentition, delayed puberty in males, and genital anomalies (Bamshad et al., 1996).
Radial hypoplasia-triphalangeal thumbs-hypospadias-maxillary diastema syndrome
MedGen UID:
357271
Concept ID:
C1867397
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has manifestation of symmetric, nonopposable triphalangeal thumbs and radial hypoplasia. It has been described in eight patients (five females and three males) spanning generations of a family. The affected males also presented with hypospadias. The syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 1
MedGen UID:
390966
Concept ID:
C2676137
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Acromesomelic dysplasia 2C, Hunter-Thompson type
MedGen UID:
419681
Concept ID:
C2930970
Disease or Syndrome
Acromesomelic dysplasia-2C (AMD2C) is characterized by skeletal abnormalities restricted to the limbs; the craniofacial skeleton and axial skeletal structures are normal. The severity of the long bone shortening progresses in a proximal to distal direction. The hands and feet are most severely affected, but the distal phalanges are relative normal. Affected individuals have joint dislocations but the number of joints involved is not constant (summary by Thomas et al., 1996). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of acromesomelic dysplasia, see AMD1 (602875).
ALG12-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
443954
Concept ID:
C2931001
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), previously called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes (CDGSs), are a group of hereditary multisystem disorders first recognized by Jaeken et al. (1980). The characteristic biochemical abnormality of CDGs is the hypoglycosylation of glycoproteins, which is routinely determined by isoelectric focusing (IEF) of serum transferrin. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there is a defect in the assembly of lipid-linked oligosaccharides or their transfer onto nascent glycoproteins, whereas type II CDG comprises defects of trimming, elongation, and processing of protein-bound glycans. CDG1G is a multisystem disorder characterized by impaired psychomotor development, dysmorphic features, failure to thrive, male genital hypoplasia, coagulation abnormalities, and immune deficiency. More variable features include skeletal dysplasia, cardiac anomalies, ocular abnormalities, and sensorineural hearing loss. Some patients die in the early neonatal or infantile period, whereas others are mildly affected and live to adulthood (summary by Tahata et al., 2019). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Choanal atresia with radial ray hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
419083
Concept ID:
C2931464
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare syndrome with characteristics of radial ray hypoplasia, choanal atresia and convergent strabismus. It has been reported in a father and his two daughters. The radial ray involvement varies from absent radius, first metacarpal and thumb to hypoplastic thumb or triphalangeal thumb. Transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait.
Fanconi anemia complementation group O
MedGen UID:
462003
Concept ID:
C3150653
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Fanconi anemia complementation group F
MedGen UID:
854016
Concept ID:
C3469526
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Fanconi anemia complementation group P
MedGen UID:
854020
Concept ID:
C3469542
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 11
MedGen UID:
766956
Concept ID:
C3554042
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
VATER association
MedGen UID:
902479
Concept ID:
C4225671
Disease or Syndrome
VATER is a mnemonically useful acronym for the nonrandom association of vertebral defects (V), anal atresia (A), tracheoesophageal fistula with esophageal atresia (TE), and radial or renal dysplasia (R). This combination of associated defects was pointed out by Quan and Smith (1972). Nearly all cases have been sporadic. VACTERL is an acronym for an expanded definition of the association that includes cardiac malformations (C) and limb anomalies (L). The VACTERL association is a spectrum of various combinations of its 6 components, which can be a manifestation of several recognized disorders rather than a distinct anatomic or etiologic entity (Khoury et al., 1983). Also see VATER/VACTERL association with hydrocephalus (VACTERL-H; 276950) and VACTERL with or without hydrocephalus (VACTERLX; 314390).
Fanconi anemia complementation group U
MedGen UID:
934618
Concept ID:
C4310651
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Fanconi anemia, complementation group W
MedGen UID:
1621245
Concept ID:
C4521564
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Microcephaly, short stature, and limb abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1613834
Concept ID:
C4539873
Disease or Syndrome
MISSLA is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, variable short stature, and limb abnormalities mainly affecting the upper limb and radial ray. Affected individuals typically have mild intellectual disability, but may have normal development (summary by Reynolds et al., 2017).
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1645760
Concept ID:
C4551851
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia 19 with or without polydactyly
MedGen UID:
1635837
Concept ID:
C4693524
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia with or without polydactyly, see SRTD1 (208500).
Autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome
MedGen UID:
1770070
Concept ID:
C5399974
Disease or Syndrome
ROR2-related Robinow syndrome is characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, skeletal abnormalities, and other anomalies. Craniofacial features include macrocephaly, broad prominent forehead, low-set ears, ocular hypertelorism, prominent eyes, midface hypoplasia, short upturned nose with depressed nasal bridge and flared nostrils, large and triangular mouth with exposed incisors and upper gums, gum hypertrophy, misaligned teeth, ankyloglossia, and micrognathia. Skeletal abnormalities include short stature, mesomelic or acromesomelic limb shortening, hemivertebrae with fusion of thoracic vertebrae, and brachydactyly. Other common features include micropenis with or without cryptorchidism in males and reduced clitoral size and hypoplasia of the labia majora in females, renal tract abnormalities, and nail hypoplasia or dystrophy. The disorder is recognizable at birth or in early childhood.
Upper limb mesomelic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
1811806
Concept ID:
C5574958
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is an isolated upper limb mesomelic dysplasia. It has been described in four patients from two unrelated families (a man and his daughter, and a Lebanese man and his son). Patients present with ulnar hypoplasia with severe radial bowing, but normal stature. The mode of transmission is likely to be autosomal dominant with variable expressivity.
LADD syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1824096
Concept ID:
C5774323
Disease or Syndrome
Lacrimoauriculodentodigital syndrome-1 (LADD1) is a multiple congenital anomaly disorder mainly affecting lacrimal glands and ducts, salivary glands and ducts, ears, teeth, and distal limb segments (summary by Rohmann et al., 2006). Genetic Heterogeneity of Lacrimoauriculodentodigital Syndrome LADD syndrome-2 (LADD2; 620192) is caused by mutation in the FGFR3 gene (134934) on chromosome 4p16, and LADD syndrome-3 (LADD3; 620193) is caused by mutation in the FGF10 gene, an FGFR ligand, on chromosome 5p12.

Professional guidelines

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Hofbauer LC, Busse B, Eastell R, Ferrari S, Frost M, Müller R, Burden AM, Rivadeneira F, Napoli N, Rauner M
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2022 Mar;10(3):207-220. Epub 2022 Jan 31 doi: 10.1016/S2213-8587(21)00347-8. PMID: 35101185
Shoji MM, Ingall EM, Rozental TD
J Hand Surg Am 2021 Feb;46(2):126-132. Epub 2020 Aug 27 doi: 10.1016/j.jhsa.2020.07.010. PMID: 32863106
Pepe J, Body JJ, Hadji P, McCloskey E, Meier C, Obermayer-Pietsch B, Palermo A, Tsourdi E, Zillikens MC, Langdahl B, Ferrari S
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2020 Aug 1;105(8) doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgaa306. PMID: 32453819
Silva BC, Rubin MR, Cusano NE, Bilezikian JP
Osteoporos Int 2017 Feb;28(2):463-471. Epub 2016 Aug 30 doi: 10.1007/s00198-016-3750-0. PMID: 27577725
Rosenfeld JA, Traylor RN, Schaefer GB, McPherson EW, Ballif BC, Klopocki E, Mundlos S, Shaffer LG, Aylsworth AS; 1q21.1 Study Group
Eur J Hum Genet 2012 Jul;20(7):754-61. Epub 2012 Feb 8 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2012.6. PMID: 22317977Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Rutkowski PT, Samora JB
J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2021 Jul 1;29(13):563-570. doi: 10.5435/JAAOS-D-20-01133. PMID: 33826558
Shoji MM, Ingall EM, Rozental TD
J Hand Surg Am 2021 Feb;46(2):126-132. Epub 2020 Aug 27 doi: 10.1016/j.jhsa.2020.07.010. PMID: 32863106
Toriello HV
Semin Thromb Hemost 2011 Sep;37(6):707-12. Epub 2011 Nov 18 doi: 10.1055/s-0031-1291381. PMID: 22102274
Solomon BD
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2011 Aug 16;6:56. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-6-56. PMID: 21846383Free PMC Article
Watt AJ, Chung KC
Hand Clin 2009 May;25(2):265-76. doi: 10.1016/j.hcl.2008.12.008. PMID: 19380065

Therapy

Sun S, Geannette C, Braun N, Wolfe SW, Endo Y
Skeletal Radiol 2022 Jul;51(7):1463-1472. Epub 2022 Jan 11 doi: 10.1007/s00256-021-03985-4. PMID: 35013998
Pepe J, Body JJ, Hadji P, McCloskey E, Meier C, Obermayer-Pietsch B, Palermo A, Tsourdi E, Zillikens MC, Langdahl B, Ferrari S
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2020 Aug 1;105(8) doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgaa306. PMID: 32453819
Silva BC, Rubin MR, Cusano NE, Bilezikian JP
Osteoporos Int 2017 Feb;28(2):463-471. Epub 2016 Aug 30 doi: 10.1007/s00198-016-3750-0. PMID: 27577725
Hoffman RS
Toxicol Rev 2003;22(1):29-40. doi: 10.2165/00139709-200322010-00004. PMID: 14579545
Lenz W
J Med Genet 1973 Mar;10(1):34-49. doi: 10.1136/jmg.10.1.34. PMID: 4354695Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Kim JM, London DA
J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2020 Oct 1;28(19):e839-e848. doi: 10.5435/JAAOS-D-19-00625. PMID: 32649440
Murphy GRF, Logan MPO, Smith G, Sivakumar B, Smith P
J Bone Joint Surg Am 2017 Dec 20;99(24):2120-2126. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.17.00164. PMID: 29257019Free PMC Article
Solomon BD
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2011 Aug 16;6:56. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-6-56. PMID: 21846383Free PMC Article
Sachar K, Akelman E, Ehrlich MG
Hand Clin 1994 Aug;10(3):399-404. PMID: 7962146
Ogden JA, Watson HK, Bohne W
J Bone Joint Surg Am 1976 Jun;58(4):467-75. PMID: 818089

Clinical prediction guides

Sun S, Geannette C, Braun N, Wolfe SW, Endo Y
Skeletal Radiol 2022 Jul;51(7):1463-1472. Epub 2022 Jan 11 doi: 10.1007/s00256-021-03985-4. PMID: 35013998
Rutkowski PT, Samora JB
J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2021 Jul 1;29(13):563-570. doi: 10.5435/JAAOS-D-20-01133. PMID: 33826558
Silva BC, Rubin MR, Cusano NE, Bilezikian JP
Osteoporos Int 2017 Feb;28(2):463-471. Epub 2016 Aug 30 doi: 10.1007/s00198-016-3750-0. PMID: 27577725
Baek GH, Kim J
J Hand Surg Asian Pac Vol 2016 Oct;21(3):283-91. doi: 10.1142/S2424835516400087. PMID: 27595943
Ogden JA, Watson HK, Bohne W
J Bone Joint Surg Am 1976 Jun;58(4):467-75. PMID: 818089

Recent systematic reviews

Barik S, Farr S, Gallone G, Zarantonello P, Trisolino G, Di Gennaro GL
J Pediatr Orthop B 2021 Nov 1;30(6):593-600. doi: 10.1097/BPB.0000000000000841. PMID: 33315801Free PMC Article
Murphy GRF, Logan MPO, Smith G, Sivakumar B, Smith P
J Bone Joint Surg Am 2017 Dec 20;99(24):2120-2126. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.17.00164. PMID: 29257019Free PMC Article
Goyal T, Arora SS, Banerjee S, Kandwal P
J Pediatr Orthop B 2015 May;24(3):191-9. doi: 10.1097/BPB.0000000000000147. PMID: 25714935
Yammine K
Clin Anat 2013 Sep;26(6):709-18. Epub 2013 Jul 3 doi: 10.1002/ca.22289. PMID: 23825029
Bartels E, Schulz AC, Mora NW, Pineda-Alvarez DE, Wijers CHW, Marcelis CM, Stressig R, Ritgen J, Schmiedeke E, Mattheisen M, Draaken M, Hoffmann P, Hilger AC, Dworschak GC, Baudisch F, Ludwig M, Bagci S, Müller A, Gembruch U, Geipel A, Berg C, Bartmann P, Nöthen MM, van Rooij IALM, Solomon BD, Reutter HM
Clin Dysmorphol 2012 Oct;21(4):191-195. doi: 10.1097/MCD.0b013e328358243c. PMID: 22895008Free PMC Article

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