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Myalgia

MedGen UID:
68541
Concept ID:
C0231528
Sign or Symptom
Synonyms: Muscle Pain; Muscle Soreness; Muscle Sorenesses; Pain, Muscle; Pains, Muscle; Soreness, Muscle
SNOMED CT: Myalgia (68962001); Muscle pain (68962001); Muscle ache (68962001); Myodynia (68962001); Myosalgia (68962001); Myoneuralgia (68962001); Aching muscles (68962001)
 
HPO: HP:0003326

Definition

Pain in muscle. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Primary erythromelalgia
MedGen UID:
8688
Concept ID:
C0014805
Disease or Syndrome
SCN9A neuropathic pain syndromes (SCN9A-NPS) comprise SCN9A erythromelalgia (EM), SCN9A paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD), and SCN9A small fiber neuropathy (SFN). SCN9A-EM is characterized by recurrent episodes of bilateral intense, burning pain, and redness, warmth, and occasionally swelling. While the feet are more commonly affected than the hands, in severely affected individuals the legs, arms, face, and/or ears may be involved. SCN9A-PEPD is characterized by neonatal or infantile onset of autonomic manifestations that can include skin flushing, harlequin (patchy or asymmetric) color change, tonic non-epileptic attacks (stiffening), and syncope with bradycardia. Later manifestations are episodes of excruciating deep burning rectal, ocular, or submandibular pain accompanied by flushing (erythematous skin changes). SCN9A-SFN is characterized by adult-onset neuropathic pain in a stocking and glove distribution, often with a burning quality; autonomic manifestations such as dry eyes, mouth, orthostatic dizziness, palpitations, bowel or bladder disturbances; and preservation of large nerve fiber functions (normal strength, tendon reflexes, and vibration sense).
Glycogen storage disease, type VII
MedGen UID:
5342
Concept ID:
C0017926
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease VII is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized clinically by exercise intolerance, muscle cramping, exertional myopathy, and compensated hemolysis. Myoglobinuria may also occur. The deficiency of the muscle isoform of PFK results in a total and partial loss of muscle and red cell PFK activity, respectively. Raben and Sherman (1995) noted that not all patients with GSD VII seek medical care because in some cases it is a relatively mild disorder.
Familial Mediterranean fever
MedGen UID:
45811
Concept ID:
C0031069
Disease or Syndrome
Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is divided into two phenotypes: type 1 and type 2. FMF type 1 is characterized by recurrent short episodes of inflammation and serositis including fever, peritonitis, synovitis, pleuritis, and, rarely, pericarditis and meningitis. The symptoms and severity vary among affected individuals, sometimes even among members of the same family. Amyloidosis, which can lead to renal failure, is the most severe complication, if untreated. FMF type 2 is characterized by amyloidosis as the first clinical manifestation of FMF in an otherwise asymptomatic individual.
Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis
MedGen UID:
43097
Concept ID:
C0085077
Disease or Syndrome
Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (AFND) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by onset of recurrent fever and dermatologic abnormalities in childhood. Laboratory studies show elevated acute-phase reactants and activation of the inflammatory response, particularly IL1B (147720). Additional more variable features may include myalgia and arthralgia (summary by Masters et al., 2016).
Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome
MedGen UID:
61525
Concept ID:
C0206141
Disease or Syndrome
PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is a form of blood cell cancer characterized by an elevated number of cells called eosinophils in the blood. These cells help fight infections by certain parasites and are involved in the inflammation associated with allergic reactions. However, these circumstances do not account for the increased number of eosinophils in PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia.\n\nAnother characteristic feature of PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is organ damage caused by the excess eosinophils. Eosinophils release substances to aid in the immune response, but the release of excessive amounts of these substances causes damage to one or more organs, most commonly the heart, skin, lungs, or nervous system. Eosinophil-associated organ damage can lead to a heart condition known as eosinophilic endomyocardial disease, skin rashes, coughing, difficulty breathing, swelling (edema) in the lower limbs, confusion, changes in behavior, or impaired movement or sensations. People with PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia can also have an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) and elevated levels of certain chemicals called vitamin B12 and tryptase in the blood.\n\nSome people with PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia have an increased number of other types of white blood cells, such as neutrophils or mast cells. Occasionally, people with PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia develop other blood cell cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia or B-cell or T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.\n\nPDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is often grouped with a related condition called hypereosinophilic syndrome. These two conditions have very similar signs and symptoms; however, the cause of hypereosinophilic syndrome is unknown.
Paramyotonia congenita of Von Eulenburg
MedGen UID:
113142
Concept ID:
C0221055
Disease or Syndrome
Paramyotonia congenita (PMC) is an autosomal dominant myotonic disorder characterized by cold-induced prolonged localized muscle contraction and weakness. Patients may experience episodes of generalized weakness (periodic paralysis) unassociated with cold exposure (summary by Ptacek et al., 1992).
Elevated circulating creatine kinase concentration
MedGen UID:
69128
Concept ID:
C0241005
Finding
An elevation of the level of the enzyme creatine kinase (also known as creatine phosphokinase (CK; EC 2.7.3.2) in the blood. CK levels can be elevated in a number of clinical disorders such as myocardial infarction, rhabdomyolysis, and muscular dystrophy.
Familial amyloid nephropathy with urticaria AND deafness
MedGen UID:
120634
Concept ID:
C0268390
Disease or Syndrome
Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) is characterized by episodic skin rash, arthralgias, and fever associated with late-onset sensorineural deafness and renal amyloidosis (Dode et al., 2002).
Inborn glycerol kinase deficiency
MedGen UID:
82803
Concept ID:
C0268418
Disease or Syndrome
NR0B1-related adrenal hypoplasia congenita includes both X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (X-linked AHC) and Xp21 deletion (previously called complex glycerol kinase deficiency). X-linked AHC is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and/or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). Adrenal insufficiency is acute infantile onset (average age 3 weeks) in approximately 60% of affected males and childhood onset (ages 1-9 years) in approximately 40%. HH typically manifests in a male with adrenal insufficiency as delayed puberty (i.e., onset age >14 years) and less commonly as arrested puberty at about Tanner Stage 3. Rarely, X-linked AHC manifests initially in early adulthood as delayed-onset adrenal insufficiency, partial HH, and/or infertility. Heterozygous females very occasionally have manifestations of adrenal insufficiency or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Xp21 deletion includes deletion of NR0B1 (causing X-linked AHC) and GK (causing glycerol kinase deficiency), and in some cases deletion of DMD (causing Duchenne muscular dystrophy). Developmental delay has been reported in males with Xp21 deletion when the deletion extends proximally to include DMD or when larger deletions extend distally to include IL1RAPL1 and DMD.
Hyperimmunoglobulin D with periodic fever
MedGen UID:
140768
Concept ID:
C0398691
Disease or Syndrome
Mevalonate kinase deficiency is a condition characterized by recurrent episodes of fever, which typically begin during infancy. Each episode of fever lasts about 3 to 6 days, and the frequency of the episodes varies among affected individuals. In childhood the fevers seem to be more frequent, occurring as often as 25 times a year, but as the individual gets older the episodes occur less often.\n\nMevalonate kinase deficiency has additional signs and symptoms, and the severity depends on the type of the condition. There are two types of mevalonate kinase deficiency: a less severe type called hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS) and a more severe type called mevalonic aciduria (MVA).\n\nPeople with MVA have signs and symptoms of the condition at all times, not just during episodes of fever. Affected children have developmental delay, problems with movement and balance (ataxia), recurrent seizures (epilepsy), progressive problems with vision, and failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive). Individuals with MVA typically have an unusually small, elongated head. In childhood or adolescence, affected individuals may develop eye problems such as inflammation of the eye (uveitis), a blue tint in the white part of the eye (blue sclera), an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa that causes vision loss, or clouding of the lens of the eye (cataracts). Affected adults may have short stature and may develop muscle weakness (myopathy) later in life. During fever episodes, people with MVA may have an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly), lymphadenopathy, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and skin rashes. Children with MVA who are severely affected with multiple problems may live only into early childhood; mildly affected individuals may have a normal life expectancy.\n\nDuring episodes of fever, people with HIDS typically have enlargement of the lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy), abdominal pain, joint pain, diarrhea, skin rashes, and headache. Occasionally they will have painful sores called aphthous ulcers around their mouth. In females, these may also occur around the vagina. Rarely, people with HIDS develop a buildup of protein deposits (amyloidosis) in the kidneys that can lead to kidney failure. Fever episodes in individuals with HIDS can be triggered by vaccinations, surgery, injury, or stress. Most people with HIDS have abnormally high levels of immune system proteins called immunoglobulin D (IgD) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) in the blood. It is unclear why some people with HIDS have high levels of IgD and IgA and some do not. Elevated levels of these immunoglobulins do not appear to cause any signs or symptoms. Individuals with HIDS do not have any signs and symptoms of the condition between fever episodes and typically have a normal life expectancy.
Congenital myotonia, autosomal recessive form
MedGen UID:
155852
Concept ID:
C0751360
Disease or Syndrome
Myotonia congenita is characterized by muscle stiffness present from childhood; all striated muscle groups including the extrinsic eye muscles, facial muscles, and tongue may be involved. Stiffness is relieved by repeated contractions of the muscle (the "warm-up" phenomenon). Muscles are usually hypertrophic. Whereas autosomal recessive (AR) myotonia congenita is often associated with more severe manifestations (such as progressive minor distal weakness and attacks of transient weakness brought on by movement after rest), autosomal dominant (AD) myotonia congenita is not. The age of onset varies: in AD myotonia congenita onset is usually in infancy or early childhood; in AR myotonia congenita the average age of onset is slightly older. In both AR and AD myotonia congenita onset may be as late as the third or fourth decade of life.
Becker muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
182959
Concept ID:
C0917713
Disease or Syndrome
The dystrophinopathies cover a spectrum of X-linked muscle disease ranging from mild to severe that includes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Becker muscular dystrophy, and DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The mild end of the spectrum includes the phenotypes of asymptomatic increase in serum concentration of creatine phosphokinase (CK) and muscle cramps with myoglobinuria. The severe end of the spectrum includes progressive muscle diseases that are classified as Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy when skeletal muscle is primarily affected and as DMD-associated DCM when the heart is primarily affected. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) usually presents in early childhood with delayed motor milestones including delays in walking independently and standing up from a supine position. Proximal weakness causes a waddling gait and difficulty climbing stairs, running, jumping, and standing up from a squatting position. DMD is rapidly progressive, with affected children being wheelchair dependent by age 12 years. Cardiomyopathy occurs in almost all individuals with DMD after age 18 years. Few survive beyond the third decade, with respiratory complications and progressive cardiomyopathy being common causes of death. Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is characterized by later-onset skeletal muscle weakness. With improved diagnostic techniques, it has been recognized that the mild end of the spectrum includes men with onset of symptoms after age 30 years who remain ambulatory even into their 60s. Despite the milder skeletal muscle involvement, heart failure from DCM is a common cause of morbidity and the most common cause of death in BMD. Mean age of death is in the mid-40s. DMD-associated DCM is characterized by left ventricular dilation and congestive heart failure. Females heterozygous for a DMD pathogenic variant are at increased risk for DCM.
TNF receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS)
MedGen UID:
226899
Concept ID:
C1275126
Disease or Syndrome
Familial periodic fever (FPF) is an autoinflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent fever with localized myalgia and painful erythema. Febrile attacks may last 1 or 2 days but often last longer than 1 week. Arthralgia of large joints, abdominal pain, conjunctivitis, and periorbital edema are common features. During attacks, painless cutaneous lesions may develop on the trunk or extremities and may migrate distally (review by Drenth and van der Meer, 2001).
Familial partial lipodystrophy, Dunnigan type
MedGen UID:
354526
Concept ID:
C1720860
Disease or Syndrome
Familial partial lipodystrophy is a metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution beginning in late childhood or early adult life. Affected individuals gradually lose fat from the upper and lower extremities and the gluteal and truncal regions, resulting in a muscular appearance with prominent superficial veins. In some patients, adipose tissue accumulates on the face and neck, causing a double chin, fat neck, or cushingoid appearance. Metabolic abnormalities include insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosis nigricans and hypertriglyceridemia; hirsutism and menstrual abnormalities occur infrequently. Familial partial lipodystrophy may also be referred to as lipoatrophic diabetes mellitus, but the essential feature is loss of subcutaneous fat (review by Garg, 2004). The disorder may be misdiagnosed as Cushing disease (see 219080) (Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986; Garg, 2004). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Partial Lipodystrophy Familial partial lipodystrophy is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Types 1 and 2 were originally described as clinical subtypes: type 1 (FPLD1; 608600), characterized by loss of subcutaneous fat confined to the limbs (Kobberling et al., 1975), and FPLD2, characterized by loss of subcutaneous fat from the limbs and trunk (Dunnigan et al., 1974; Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986). No genetic basis for FPLD1 has yet been delineated. FPLD3 (604367) is caused by mutation in the PPARG gene (601487) on chromosome 3p25; FPLD4 (613877) is caused by mutation in the PLIN1 gene (170290) on chromosome 15q26; FPLD5 (615238) is caused by mutation in the CIDEC gene (612120) on chromosome 3p25; FPLD6 (615980) is caused by mutation in the LIPE gene (151750) on chromosome 19q13; FPLD7 (606721) is caused by mutation in the CAV1 gene (601047) on chromosome 7q31; FPLD8 (620679), caused by mutation in the ADRA2A gene (104210) on chromosome 10q25; and FPLD9 (620683), caused by mutation in the PLAAT3 gene (613867) on chromosome 11q12.
Brody myopathy
MedGen UID:
371441
Concept ID:
C1832918
Disease or Syndrome
Brody disease (BROD) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by exercise-induced muscle stiffness and cramps primarily affecting the arms, legs, and eyelids, although more generalized muscle involvement may also occur. Symptom onset is most often in the first decade, but many patients present and are diagnosed later in life. Skeletal muscle biopsy typically shows variation in fiber size, increased internal nuclei, and atrophy of type II muscle fibers. Rare patients have been reported to develop malignant hyperthermia after administration of anesthesia, suggesting that patients with the disorder should be tested. The disorder results from defective relaxation of fast-twitch (type II) skeletal muscle fibers due to defects in calcium homeostasis and reuptake in the muscle fiber (summary by Odermatt et al., 2000 and Molenaar et al., 2020).
Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, myopathic form
MedGen UID:
371584
Concept ID:
C1833508
Disease or Syndrome
Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty-acid oxidation. The three clinical presentations are lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form, and myopathic form (which is usually mild and can manifest from infancy to adulthood). While the former two are severe multisystemic diseases characterized by liver failure with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, seizures, and early death, the latter is characterized by exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness, sometimes associated with myoglobinuria. The myopathic form of CPT II deficiency is the most common disorder of lipid metabolism affecting skeletal muscle and the most frequent cause of hereditary myoglobinuria. Males are more likely to be affected than females.
Autosomal dominant myoglobinuria
MedGen UID:
320384
Concept ID:
C1834567
Disease or Syndrome
A rare metabolic myopathy with characteristics of episodic myalgia with myoglobinuria which is induced by fever, viral or bacterial infection, prolonged exercise or alcohol abuse, and could, on occasion, lead to acute renal failure. Between episodes, patients may be asymptomatic or could present elevated creatine kinase levels and mild muscle weakness. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1997.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 3
MedGen UID:
373087
Concept ID:
C1836439
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is characterized by multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. The most common clinical features include adult onset of weakness of the external eye muscles and exercise intolerance. Patients with C10ORF2-linked adPEO may have other clinical features including proximal muscle weakness, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, cataracts, depression, and endocrine abnormalities (summary by Fratter et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640). PEO caused by mutations in the POLG gene (174763) are associated with more complicated phenotypes than those forms caused by mutations in the SLC25A4 (103220) or C10ORF2 genes (Lamantea et al., 2002).
Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome
MedGen UID:
333403
Concept ID:
C1839780
Disease or Syndrome
FMR1 disorders include fragile X syndrome (FXS), fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), and fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI). Fragile X syndrome occurs in individuals with an FMR1 full mutation or other loss-of-function variant and is nearly always characterized in affected males by developmental delay and intellectual disability along with a variety of behavioral issues. Autism spectrum disorder is present in 50%-70% of individuals with FXS. Affected males may have characteristic craniofacial features (which become more obvious with age) and medical problems including hypotonia, gastroesophageal reflux, strabismus, seizures, sleep disorders, joint laxity, pes planus, scoliosis, and recurrent otitis media. Adults may have mitral valve prolapse or aortic root dilatation. The physical and behavioral features seen in males with FXS have been reported in females heterozygous for the FMR1 full mutation, but with lower frequency and milder involvement. FXTAS occurs in individuals who have an FMR1 premutation and is characterized by late-onset, progressive cerebellar ataxia and intention tremor followed by cognitive impairment. Psychiatric disorders are common. Age of onset is typically between 60 and 65 years and is more common among males who are hemizygous for the premutation (40%) than among females who are heterozygous for the premutation (16%-20%). FXPOI, defined as hypergonadotropic hypogonadism before age 40 years, has been observed in 20% of women who carry a premutation allele compared to 1% in the general population.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I
MedGen UID:
339580
Concept ID:
C1846672
Disease or Syndrome
MDGDC5 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy characterized by variable age at onset, normal cognition, and no structural brain changes (Brockington et al., 2001). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B5
MedGen UID:
335764
Concept ID:
C1847759
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB5 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy with impaired intellectual development and structural brain abnormalities (Brockington et al., 2001). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Myoglobinuria, acute recurrent, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
340308
Concept ID:
C1849386
Disease or Syndrome
Recurrent myoglobinuria is characterized by recurrent attacks of rhabdomyolysis associated with muscle pain and weakness and followed by excretion of myoglobin in the urine. Renal failure may occasionally occur. Onset is usually in early childhood under the age of 5 years. Unlike the exercise-induced rhabdomyolyses such as McArdle syndrome (232600), carnitine palmitoyltransferase deficiency (see 255110), and the Creteil variety of phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency (311800), the attacks in recurrent myoglobinuria no relation to exercise, but are triggered by intercurrent illnesses, commonly upper respiratory tract infections (Ramesh and Gardner-Medwin, 1992). See 160010 for discussion of a possible autosomal dominant form of myoglobinuria. Severe rhabdomyolysis is a major clinical feature of anesthetic-induced malignant hyperthermia (145600), an autosomal dominant disorder.
Neutral lipid storage myopathy
MedGen UID:
339913
Concept ID:
C1853136
Disease or Syndrome
Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy (NLSDM) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs and associated with increased serum creatine kinase; distal muscle weakness may also occur. About half of patients develop cardiomyopathy later in the disease course. Other variable features include diabetes mellitus, hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and possibly sensorineural hearing loss. Leukocytes and muscle cells show cytoplasmic accumulation of triglycerides (summary by Reilich et al., 2011). Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy belongs to a group of disorders termed neutral lipid storage disorders (NLSDs). These disorders are characterized by the presence of triglyceride-containing cytoplasmic droplets in leukocytes and in other tissues, including bone marrow, skin, and muscle. Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS; 275630) is defined as NLSD with ichthyosis (NLSDI). Patients with NLSDM present with myopathy but without ichthyosis (summary by Fischer et al., 2007).
Stormorken syndrome
MedGen UID:
350028
Concept ID:
C1861451
Disease or Syndrome
Stormorken syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mild bleeding tendency due to platelet dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, anemia, asplenia, tubular aggregate myopathy, congenital miosis, and ichthyosis. Additional features may include headache or recurrent stroke-like episodes (summary by Misceo et al., 2014).
Xanthinuria type II
MedGen UID:
350953
Concept ID:
C1863688
Disease or Syndrome
Xanthinuria type II (XAN2) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting from a defect in the synthesis of the molybdenum cofactor, which is necessary for the 2 enzymes that degrade xanthine: XDH (607633) and AOX1 (602841). Most individuals with type II xanthinuria are asymptomatic, but some develop urinary tract calculi, acute renal failure, or myositis due to tissue deposition of xanthine. Laboratory studies show increased serum and urinary hypoxanthine and xanthine and decreased serum and urinary uric acid (summary by Ichida et al., 2001). Two clinically similar but distinct forms of xanthinuria are recognized. In type I xanthinuria (XAN1; 278300), there is an isolated deficiency of xanthine dehydrogenase resulting from mutation in the XDH gene; in type II, there is a dual deficiency of xanthine dehydrogenase and aldehyde oxidase. Type I patients can metabolize allopurinol, whereas type II patients cannot (Simmonds et al., 1995).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 4
MedGen UID:
350480
Concept ID:
C1864668
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia-4 is an autosomal dominant form of mitochondrial disease that variably affects skeletal muscle, the nervous system, the liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Age at onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. The phenotype ranges from relatively mild, with adult-onset skeletal muscle weakness and weakness of the external eye muscles, to severe, with a multisystem disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, lactic acidosis, constipation, and liver involvement (summary by Young et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640).
Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency
MedGen UID:
370665
Concept ID:
C1969443
Disease or Syndrome
Long-chain hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency and trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency are caused by impairment of mitochondrial TFP. TFP has three enzymatic activities – long-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and long-chain 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase. In individuals with LCHAD deficiency, there is isolated deficiency of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, while deficiency of all three enzymes occurs in individuals with TFP deficiency. Individuals with TFP deficiency can present with a severe-to-mild phenotype, while individuals with LCHAD deficiency typically present with a severe-to-intermediate phenotype. Neonates with the severe phenotype present within a few days of birth with hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, encephalopathy, and often cardiomyopathy. The intermediate phenotype is characterized by hypoketotic hypoglycemia precipitated by infection or fasting in infancy. The mild (late-onset) phenotype is characterized by myopathy and/or neuropathy. Long-term complications include peripheral neuropathy and retinopathy.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L
MedGen UID:
370102
Concept ID:
C1969785
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ANO5 muscle disease is a continuum that ranges from asymptomatic hyperCKemia and exercise-induced myalgia to proximal and/or distal muscle weakness. The most typical presentation is limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L (LGMD2L) with late-onset proximal lower-limb weakness in the fourth or fifth decade (range 15-70 years). Less common is Miyoshi-like disease (Miyoshi muscular dystrophy 3) with early-adult-onset calf distal myopathy (around age 20 years). Incidental hyperCKemia may be present even earlier. Initial symptoms are walking difficulties, reduced sports performance, and difficulties in standing on toes as well as nonspecific exercise myalgia and/or burning sensation in the calf muscles. Muscle weakness and atrophy are frequently asymmetric. Cardiac findings can include cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias and/or left ventricular dysfunction. Bulbar or respiratory symptoms have not been reported. Females have milder disease manifestations than males. Disease progression is slow in both the LGMD and distal forms; ambulation is preserved until very late in the disease course. Life span is normal.
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
435869
Concept ID:
C2673198
Disease or Syndrome
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome-2 (FCAS2) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by episodic and recurrent rash, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia, and headache. In most patients, these episodes are accompanied by fever and serologic evidence of inflammation. Most, but not all, patients report exposure to cold as a trigger for the episodes. Additional features may include abdominal pain, thoracic pain, and sensorineural deafness. The age at onset is variable, ranging from the first year of life to middle age, and the severity and clinical manifestations are heterogeneous (summary by Shen et al., 2017). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, see FCAS1 (120100).
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4
MedGen UID:
412871
Concept ID:
C2750069
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 (CGL4) combines the phenotype of classic Berardinelli-Seip lipodystrophy (608594) with muscular dystrophy and cardiac conduction anomalies (Hayashi et al., 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital generalized lipodystrophy, see CGL1 (608594).
Glycogen storage disease due to muscle beta-enolase deficiency
MedGen UID:
442873
Concept ID:
C2752027
Disease or Syndrome
Muscle beta-enolase deficiency is a glycolysis disorder reported in one patient to date and characterized clinically by exercise intolerance and myalgia due to severe enolase deficiency in muscle.
Myotonic dystrophy type 2
MedGen UID:
419137
Concept ID:
C2931689
Disease or Syndrome
Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is characterized by myotonia and muscle dysfunction (proximal and axial weakness, myalgia, and stiffness), and less commonly by posterior subcapsular cataracts, cardiac conduction defects, insulin-insensitive type 2 diabetes mellitus, and other endocrine abnormalities. While myotonia (involuntary muscle contraction with delayed relaxation) has been reported during the first decade, onset is typically in the third to fourth decade, most commonly with fluctuating or episodic muscle pain that can be debilitating and proximal and axial weakness of the neck flexors and the hip flexors. Subsequently, weakness occurs in the elbow extensors and finger flexors. Facial weakness and weakness of the ankle dorsiflexors are less common. Myotonia rarely causes severe symptoms. In a subset of individuals, calf hypertrophy in combination with brisk reflexes is notable.
Glycogen storage disease due to lactate dehydrogenase M-subunit deficiency
MedGen UID:
419152
Concept ID:
C2931743
Disease or Syndrome
Lactate dehydrogenase deficiency is a condition that affects how the body breaks down sugar to use as energy in cells, primarily muscle cells.\n\nThere are two types of this condition: lactate dehydrogenase-A deficiency (sometimes called glycogen storage disease XI) and lactate dehydrogenase-B deficiency.\n\nPeople with lactate dehydrogenase-A deficiency experience fatigue, muscle pain, and cramps during exercise (exercise intolerance). In some people with lactate dehydrogenase-A deficiency, high-intensity exercise or other strenuous activity leads to the breakdown of muscle tissue (rhabdomyolysis). The destruction of muscle tissue releases a protein called myoglobin, which is processed by the kidneys and released in the urine (myoglobinuria). Myoglobin causes the urine to be red or brown. This protein can also damage the kidneys, in some cases leading to life-threatening kidney failure. Some people with lactate dehydrogenase-A deficiency develop skin rashes. The severity of the signs and symptoms among individuals with lactate dehydrogenase-A deficiency varies greatly.\n\nPeople with lactate dehydrogenase-B deficiency typically do not have any signs or symptoms of the condition. They do not have difficulty with physical activity or any specific physical features related to the condition. Affected individuals are usually discovered only when routine blood tests reveal reduced lactate dehydrogenase activity.
Potassium-aggravated myotonia
MedGen UID:
444151
Concept ID:
C2931826
Disease or Syndrome
In a report on the 37th ENMC Workshop, Rudel and Lehmann-Horn (1997) stated that the sodium channelopathies can be divided into 3 different forms: paramyotonia, potassium-aggravated myotonia, and periodic paralysis. Potassium-aggravated myotonia includes mild myotonia fluctuans, severe myotonia permanens, and acetazolamide-responsive myotonia.
Congenital myotonia, autosomal dominant form
MedGen UID:
422446
Concept ID:
C2936781
Disease or Syndrome
Myotonia congenita is characterized by muscle stiffness present from childhood; all striated muscle groups including the extrinsic eye muscles, facial muscles, and tongue may be involved. Stiffness is relieved by repeated contractions of the muscle (the "warm-up" phenomenon). Muscles are usually hypertrophic. Whereas autosomal recessive (AR) myotonia congenita is often associated with more severe manifestations (such as progressive minor distal weakness and attacks of transient weakness brought on by movement after rest), autosomal dominant (AD) myotonia congenita is not. The age of onset varies: in AD myotonia congenita onset is usually in infancy or early childhood; in AR myotonia congenita the average age of onset is slightly older. In both AR and AD myotonia congenita onset may be as late as the third or fourth decade of life.
Brittle cornea syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
481641
Concept ID:
C3280011
Disease or Syndrome
Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is characterized by blue sclerae, corneal rupture after minor trauma, keratoconus or keratoglobus, hyperelasticity of the skin, and hypermobility of the joints (Al-Hussain et al., 2004). It is classified as a form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (Malfait et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of brittle cornea syndrome, see BCS1 (229200).
Granulomatosis with polyangiitis
MedGen UID:
811223
Concept ID:
C3495801
Disease or Syndrome
Granulomatosis with polyangiitis, formerly termed Wegener granulomatosis, is a systemic disease with a complex genetic background. It is characterized by necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tract, glomerulonephritis, vasculitis, and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmatic autoantibodies (ANCAs) in patient sera. These ANCAs are antibodies to a defined target antigen, proteinase-3 (PR3, PRTN3; 177020), which is present within primary azurophil granules of neutrophils (PMNs) and lysozymes of monocytes. On cytokine priming of PMNs, PR3 translocates to the cell surface, where PR3-ANCAs can interact with their antigens and activate PMNs. PMNs from patients with active GPA express PR3 on their surface, produce respiratory burst, and release proteolytic enzymes after activation with PR3-ANCAs. The consequence is a self-sustaining inflammatory process (Jagiello et al., 2004).
Immunodeficiency, common variable, 7
MedGen UID:
762276
Concept ID:
C3542922
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA deletion syndrome with progressive myopathy
MedGen UID:
767513
Concept ID:
C3554599
Disease or Syndrome
PEOA6 is characterized by muscle weakness, mainly affecting the lower limbs, external ophthalmoplegia, exercise intolerance, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions on muscle biopsy. Symptoms may appear in childhood or adulthood and show slow progression (summary by Ronchi et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640).
Myofibrillar myopathy 3
MedGen UID:
811509
Concept ID:
C3714934
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of muscular disorders characterized by a pathologic morphologic pattern of myofibrillar degradation and abnormal accumulation of proteins involved with the sarcomeric Z disc (summary by Foroud et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 12B (cardiomyopathic type), autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
815773
Concept ID:
C3809443
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-12B is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder characterized by childhood onset of slowly progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and generalized skeletal myopathy resulting in exercise intolerance, and, in some patients, muscle weakness and atrophy. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows ragged-red fibers, mtDNA depletion, and accumulation of abnormal mitochondria (summary by Echaniz-Laguna et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mtDNA depletion syndromes, see MTDPS1 (603041).
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, musculocontractural type 2
MedGen UID:
816175
Concept ID:
C3809845
Disease or Syndrome
The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDSMC2) is characterized by progressive multisystem fragility-related manifestations, including joint dislocations and deformities; skin hyperextensibility, bruisability, and fragility, with recurrent large subcutaneous hematomas; cardiac valvular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and ophthalmologic complications; and myopathy, featuring muscle hypoplasia, muscle weakness, and an abnormal muscle fiber pattern in histology in adulthood, resulting in gross motor developmental delay (summary by Muller et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, see EDSMC1 (601776).
Vasculitis due to ADA2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2.
Polyglucosan body myopathy type 1
MedGen UID:
863042
Concept ID:
C4014605
Disease or Syndrome
Polyglucosan body myopathy-1 (PGBM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset in childhood of progressive proximal muscle weakness, resulting in difficulties in ambulation. Most patients also develop progressive dilated cardiomyopathy, which may necessitate cardiac transplant in severe cases. A small subset of patients present with severe immunodeficiency and a hyperinflammatory state in very early childhood (summary by Boisson et al., 2012 and Nilsson et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Polyglucosan Body Myopathy See also PGBM2 (616199), caused by mutation in the GYG1 gene (603942) on chromosome 3q24.
Periodic fever-infantile enterocolitis-autoinflammatory syndrome
MedGen UID:
863504
Concept ID:
C4015067
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation with infantile enterocolitis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by onset of recurrent flares of autoinflammation in early infancy. Affected individuals tend to have poor overall growth and gastrointestinal symptoms in infancy associated with laboratory evidence of activated inflammation. This initial presentation is followed by recurrent febrile episodes with splenomegaly and sometimes hematologic disturbances, arthralgias, or myalgias. The disorder results from overactivation of an arm of the immune response system (Romberg et al., 2014; Canna et al., 2014).
Myopathy due to calsequestrin and SERCA1 protein overload
MedGen UID:
864061
Concept ID:
C4015624
Disease or Syndrome
Vacuolar myopathy with CASQ1 aggregates is an autosomal dominant mild muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of muscle cramping and weakness as well as increased levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). The disorder is not progressive, and some patients may be asymptomatic (summary by Rossi et al., 2014).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 2
MedGen UID:
901897
Concept ID:
C4225312
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions-2 (PEOB2) is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive external ophthalmoplegia, exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, and signs and symptoms of spinocerebellar ataxia, such as impaired gait and dysarthria. Some patients may have respiratory insufficiency. Laboratory studies are consistent with a defect in mtDNA replication (summary by Reyes et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive PEO, see PEOB1 (258450).
Infantile-onset periodic fever-panniculitis-dermatosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
934581
Concept ID:
C4310614
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation, panniculitis, and dermatosis syndrome (AIPDS) is an autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disease characterized by neonatal onset of recurrent fever, erythematous rash with painful nodules, painful joints, and lipodystrophy. Additional features may include diarrhea, increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocytosis, and neutrophilia in the absence of any infection. Patients exhibit no overt primary immunodeficiency (Damgaard et al., 2016 and Zhou et al., 2016).
Yao syndrome
MedGen UID:
934587
Concept ID:
C4310620
Disease or Syndrome
Yao syndrome (YAOS) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by periodic fever, dermatitis, arthritis, and swelling of the distal extremities, as well as gastrointestinal and sicca-like symptoms. The disorder is associated with specific NOD2 variants (and Shen, 2017).
Myofibrillar myopathy 7
MedGen UID:
934678
Concept ID:
C4310711
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-7 (MFM7) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by early childhood onset of slowly progressive muscle weakness that primarily affects the lower limbs and is associated with joint contractures (summary by Straussberg et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type R18
MedGen UID:
1385598
Concept ID:
C4517996
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-18 (LGMD18) is characterized by childhood-onset of proximal muscle weakness resulting in gait abnormalities and scapular winging. Serum creatine kinase is increased. A subset of patients may show a hyperkinetic movement disorder with chorea, ataxia, or dystonia and global developmental delay (summary by Bogershausen et al., 2013). Additional more variable features include alacrima, achalasia, cataracts, or hepatic steatosis (Liang et al., 2015; Koehler et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Mitochondrial myopathy-cerebellar ataxia-pigmentary retinopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1620960
Concept ID:
C4540096
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial myopathy and ataxia (MMYAT) is an autosomal recessive mtDNA depletion disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, congenital muscle involvement with histologic findings ranging from myopathic to dystrophic, and pigmentary retinopathy (summary by Donkervoort et al., 2019).
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1647324
Concept ID:
C4551895
Disease or Syndrome
Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are a group of conditions that have overlapping signs and symptoms and the same genetic cause. The group includes three conditions known as familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome type 1 (FCAS1), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disorder (NOMID). These conditions were once thought to be distinct disorders but are now considered to be part of the same condition spectrum. FCAS1 is the least severe form of CAPS, MWS is intermediate in severity, and NOMID is the most severe form.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of CAPS affect multiple body systems. Generally, CAPS are characterized by periodic episodes of skin rash, fever, and joint pain. These episodes can be triggered by exposure to cold temperatures, fatigue, other stressors, or they may arise spontaneously. Episodes can last from a few hours to several days. These episodes typically begin in infancy or early childhood and persist throughout life.\n\nIn people with NOMID, the signs and symptoms of the condition are usually present from birth and persists throughout life. In addition to skin rash and fever, affected individuals may have joint inflammation, swelling, and joint deformities called contractures that may restrict movement. People with NOMID typically have headaches, seizures, and cognitive impairment resulting from chronic meningitis, which is inflammation of the tissue that covers and protects the brain and spinal cord (meninges). Other features of NOMID include eye problems, short stature, distinctive facial features, and kidney damage caused by amyloidosis.\n\nWhile the CAPS spectrum shares similar signs and symptoms, the individual conditions tend to have distinct patterns of features. People with FCAS1 are particularly sensitive to the cold, and exposure to cold temperatures can trigger a painful or burning rash. The rash usually affects the torso and limbs but may spread to the rest of the body. In addition to fever and joint pain, other possible symptoms include muscle aches, chills, drowsiness, eye redness, headache, and nausea.\n\nIndividuals with MWS develop the typical periodic episodes of skin rash, fever, and joint pain after cold exposure, although episodes may occur spontaneously or all the time. Additionally, they can develop progressive hearing loss in their teenage years. Other features of MWS include skin lesions or kidney damage from abnormal deposits of a protein called amyloid (amyloidosis).
MYH7-related skeletal myopathy
MedGen UID:
1647391
Concept ID:
C4552004
Disease or Syndrome
Laing distal myopathy is characterized by early-onset weakness (usually before age 5 years) that initially involves the dorsiflexors of the ankles and great toes and then the finger extensors, especially those of the third and fourth fingers. Weakness of the neck flexors is seen in most affected individuals and mild facial weakness is often present. After distal weakness has been present for more than ten years, mild proximal weakness may be observed. Life expectancy is normal.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 36
MedGen UID:
1644927
Concept ID:
C4693722
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy with internal nuclei and atypical cores
MedGen UID:
1642424
Concept ID:
C4707232
Disease or Syndrome
Centronuclear myopathy is a condition characterized by muscle weakness (myopathy) and wasting (atrophy) in the skeletal muscles, which are the muscles used for movement. The severity of centronuclear myopathy varies among affected individuals, even among members of the same family.\n\nPeople with centronuclear myopathy begin experiencing muscle weakness at any time from birth to early adulthood. The muscle weakness slowly worsens over time and can lead to delayed development of motor skills, such as crawling or walking; muscle pain during exercise; and difficulty walking. Some affected individuals may need wheelchair assistance as the muscles atrophy and weakness becomes more severe. In rare instances, the muscle weakness improves over time.\n\nA key feature of centronuclear myopathy is the displacement of the nucleus in muscle cells, which can be viewed under a microscope. Normally the nucleus is found at the edges of the rod-shaped muscle cells, but in people with centronuclear myopathy the nucleus is located in the center of these cells. How the change in location of the nucleus affects muscle cell function is unknown.\n\nSome people with centronuclear myopathy experience mild to severe breathing problems related to the weakness of muscles needed for breathing. People with centronuclear myopathy may have droopy eyelids (ptosis) and weakness in other facial muscles, including the muscles that control eye movement. People with this condition may also have foot abnormalities, a high arch in the roof of the mouth (high-arched palate), and abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis). Rarely, individuals with centronuclear myopathy have a weakened heart muscle (cardiomyopathy), disturbances in nerve function (neuropathy), or intellectual disability.
Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D (DNAJB6)
MedGen UID:
1648441
Concept ID:
C4721885
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy is characterized by proximal and/or distal muscle weakness and atrophy. The age at onset is variable and can range from the first to the sixth decade, although later onset is less common. Most patients present with proximal muscle weakness that progresses to distal involvement, but some can present with distal impairment. The severity is variable: patients with a more severe phenotype can lose ambulation after several decades and have facial weakness with bulbar and respiratory involvement. Muscle biopsy shows dystrophic changes with protein aggregates, myofibrillar degeneration, and rimmed vacuoles (summary by Ruggieri et al., 2015). Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Dominant Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Other forms of autosomal dominant LGMD include LGMDD2 (608423), previously LGMD1F, caused by mutation in the TNPO3 gene (610032) on chromosome 7q32; LGMDD3 (609115), previously LGMD1G, caused by mutation in the HNRNPDL gene (607137) on chromosome 4q21; and LGMDD4 (618129), previously LGMD1I, caused by mutation in the CAPN3 gene (114240) on chromosome 15q15. For a discussion of autosomal recessive LGMD, see 253600.
Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, autosomal dominant 4
MedGen UID:
1648316
Concept ID:
C4748295
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-4 (LGMDD4) is characterized by onset of proximal muscle weakness in young adulthood. Affected individuals often have gait difficulties; some may have upper limb involvement. Other features include variably increased serum creatine kinase, myalgia, and back pain. The severity and expressivity of the disorder is highly variable, even within families (summary by Vissing et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see 603511.
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 29
MedGen UID:
1648451
Concept ID:
C4748830
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial myopathy, episodic, with optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy
MedGen UID:
1679560
Concept ID:
C5193223
Disease or Syndrome
Episodic mitochondrial myopathy with or without optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy (MEOAL) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized mainly by childhood onset of progressive muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. Patients have episodic exacerbation, which may be associated with increased serum creatine kinase or lactic acid. Additional more variable features may include optic atrophy, reversible leukoencephalopathy, and later onset of a sensorimotor polyneuropathy. The disorder results from impaired formation of Fe-S clusters, which are essential cofactors for proper mitochondrial function (summary by Gurgel-Giannetti et al., 2018)
Bone marrow failure syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
1717739
Concept ID:
C5394274
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 49
MedGen UID:
1762338
Concept ID:
C5436616
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 83, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1759445
Concept ID:
C5436637
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia-83 (SPG83) is a neurologic disorder characterized by progressive lower limb spasticity resulting in gait instability. Patients develop symptoms in the second decade, consistent with juvenile onset. Some patients may have myalgia or mild dysarthria, but the phenotype is considered to be a pure type of SPG with no additional neurologic abnormalities (summary by Husain et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see SPG5A (270800).
Myofibrillar myopathy 10
MedGen UID:
1769385
Concept ID:
C5436656
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-10 (MFM10) is an autosomal recessive structural muscle disorder characterized by onset of muscle pain, cramping, and exercise fatigue in the first or second decades of life. Some patients have mild contractures of the large joints apparent in early childhood. Affected individuals have a characteristic appearance of a thick neck and prominent shoulder girdle with anteverted shoulders and a tendency toward kyphosis. There is no apparent muscle weakness, but some affected individuals show progressive muscle rigidity leading to limited mobility. There is variable cardiac involvement, ranging from chest pain with left ventricular hypertrophy to subclinical signs such as abnormal EKG or elevated cardiac enzymes. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows structural abnormalities with myofibrillar disorganization and accumulation of autophagocytic vacuoles (summary by Hedberg-Oldfors et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 7
MedGen UID:
1754683
Concept ID:
C5436685
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 7 (MC4DN7) is an autosomal recessive metabolic encephalomyopathic disorder with highly variable manifestations. Only a few patients have been reported. Some patients have normal early development then show rapid neurodegeneration with progressive muscle weakness, gait disturbances, and cognitive decline in mid to late childhood. Other features may include seizures and visual impairment. Brain imaging shows progressive leukodystrophy with cystic lesions. In contrast, at least 1 patient has been reported who presented in the neonatal period with metabolic acidosis, hydrocephalus, hypotonia, and cortical blindness. This patient developed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy resulting in early death. All patients had increased serum lactate and decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV (summary by Massa et al., 2008 and Abdulhag et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal recessive 7
MedGen UID:
1786836
Concept ID:
C5543119
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-7 (HMNR7) is characterized by onset of lower leg weakness in the first decade. Affected individuals have difficulty climbing stairs and problems standing on the heels. Some patients have later onset well into the adult years. Most patients have foot deformities, and some may have leg muscle atrophy. The disorder is slowly progressive and often involves the upper limbs. Muscle biopsy and electrophysiologic studies are consistent with both a myopathic process and an axonal motor neuropathy. Sensory abnormalities are not typically present, and patients remain ambulatory. The phenotype shows phenotypic overlap with distal hereditary motor neuropathy, but can distinguished by the presence of myopathic features (summary by Deschauer et al., 2021 and Pagnamenta et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive HMN, see HMNR1 (604320).
Neurodegeneration with ataxia and late-onset optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
1779901
Concept ID:
C5543254
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodegeneration with ataxia and late-onset optic atrophy (NDAXOA) is an autosomal dominant disorder with somewhat variable manifestations. Most affected individuals present in mid-adulthood with slowly progressive cerebellar and gait ataxia, optic atrophy, and myopathy or myalgia. Some patients may have a childhood history of neurologic features, including limited extraocular movements. Additional features can include cardiomyopathy, psychiatric disturbances, and peripheral sensory impairment (summary by Taylor et al., 1996 and Courage et al., 2017).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2X
MedGen UID:
1799561
Concept ID:
C5568138
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-25 (LGMDR25) is characterized by slowly progressive onset of proximal lower limb weakness in adulthood. Affected individuals also develop cardiac arrhythmias resulting in syncopal episodes as young adults or later in life (summary by Schindler et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), see LGMDR1 (253600).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 54
MedGen UID:
1812715
Concept ID:
C5676912
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-54 (COXPD54) is an autosomal recessive disorder with pleiotropic multisystem presentations resulting from a disruption in mitochondrial transcription and translation. The phenotype is highly variable. Many patients have early-onset sensorineural hearing loss, sometimes in isolation, and sometimes associated with global developmental delay or primary ovarian failure. Other features may include peripheral hypertonia, seizures, muscle weakness, behavioral abnormalities, and leukoencephalopathy on brain imaging. Serum lactate may or may not be elevated (summary by Hochberg et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Rhabdomyolysis, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
1824080
Concept ID:
C5774307
Finding
Susceptibility to rhabdomyolysis-1 (RHABDO1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of rhabdomyolysis beginning in the teenage years. Some of the episodes may be triggered by exercise or heat; others occur spontaneously. Severe cases may result in acute renal failure or compartment syndrome. Affected individuals tend to have myalgia or muscle weakness in childhood and between episodes. Laboratory studies show increased serum creatine kinase and nonspecific myopathic features on skeletal muscle biopsy (Cabrera-Serrano et al., 2022).
Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
1841010
Concept ID:
C5830374
Disease or Syndrome
The mitochondrial trifunctional protein, composed of 4 alpha and 4 beta subunits, catalyzes 3 steps in mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids: long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD), long-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, and long-chain thiolase activities. Trifunctional protein deficiency is characterized by decreased activity of all 3 enzymes. Clinically, classic trifunctional protein deficiency can be classified into 3 main clinical phenotypes: neonatal onset of a severe, lethal condition resulting in sudden unexplained infant death (SIDS; 272120), infantile onset of a hepatic Reye-like syndrome, and late-adolescent onset of primarily a skeletal myopathy (summary by Spiekerkoetter et al., 2003). Some patients with MTP deficiency show a protracted progressive course associated with myopathy, recurrent rhabdomyolysis, and sensorimotor axonal neuropathy. These patients tend to survive into adolescence and adulthood (den Boer et al., 2003). See mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency-1 (609015), caused by mutation in the HADHA gene (600890), the alpha subunit of mitochondrial trifunctional protein.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 28
MedGen UID:
1841278
Concept ID:
C5830642
Disease or Syndrome
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-28 (ALS28) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult onset of slowly progressive limb muscle weakness and atrophy resulting in gait difficulties, loss of ambulation, and distal upper limb weakness. Facial involvement is rare, but some patients may have respiratory insufficiency. EMG and muscle biopsy show active and chronic denervation. Patient-derived motor neurons show accumulation of TDP43 (605078) and toxic intranuclear RNA accumulation (Kume et al., 2023). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, see ALS1 (105400).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Ochani R, Asad A, Yasmin F, Shaikh S, Khalid H, Batra S, Sohail MR, Mahmood SF, Ochani R, Hussham Arshad M, Kumar A, Surani S
Infez Med 2021 Mar 1;29(1):20-36. PMID: 33664170
Umakanthan S, Sahu P, Ranade AV, Bukelo MM, Rao JS, Abrahao-Machado LF, Dahal S, Kumar H, Kv D
Postgrad Med J 2020 Dec;96(1142):753-758. Epub 2020 Jun 20 doi: 10.1136/postgradmedj-2020-138234. PMID: 32563999Free PMC Article
Vairo F, Haider N, Kock R, Ntoumi F, Ippolito G, Zumla A
Infect Dis Clin North Am 2019 Dec;33(4):1003-1025. doi: 10.1016/j.idc.2019.08.006. PMID: 31668189

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Wang Y, Lu H, Li S, Zhang Y, Yan F, Huang Y, Chen X, Yang A, Han L, Ma Y
J Rehabil Med 2022 Feb 8;54:jrm00258. doi: 10.2340/jrm.v53.331. PMID: 34636405Free PMC Article
Jiaming Y, Rahimi MH
J Food Biochem 2021 Oct;45(10):e13916. Epub 2021 Sep 2 doi: 10.1111/jfbc.13916. PMID: 34472118
Pergolizzi JV Jr, Coluzzi F, Colucci RD, Olsson H, LeQuang JA, Al-Saadi J, Magnusson P
Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol 2020 Mar;13(3):299-310. Epub 2020 Feb 27 doi: 10.1080/17512433.2020.1734451. PMID: 32089020
Chiu N, Chiu L, Chow R, Lam H, Verma S, Pasetka M, Chow E, DeAngelis C
J Oncol Pharm Pract 2017 Jan;23(1):56-67. Epub 2016 Jun 23 doi: 10.1177/1078155215627502. PMID: 26811404
Wong SF, Chung F
Anaesthesia 2000 Feb;55(2):144-52. doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2044.2000.055002144.x. PMID: 10651675

Diagnosis

Hussain Y, Miller S
Neurol Clin 2020 Aug;38(3):619-635. doi: 10.1016/j.ncl.2020.04.002. PMID: 32703473
Selva-O'Callaghan A, Alvarado-Cardenas M, Pinal-Fernández I, Trallero-Araguás E, Milisenda JC, Martínez MÁ, Marín A, Labrador-Horrillo M, Juárez C, Grau-Junyent JM
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2018 Mar;14(3):215-224. Epub 2018 Feb 23 doi: 10.1080/1744666X.2018.1440206. PMID: 29473763Free PMC Article
Fields KB, Rigby MD
Curr Sports Med Rep 2016 Sep-Oct;15(5):320-4. doi: 10.1249/JSR.0000000000000292. PMID: 27618240
Cook JL, Rio E, Purdam CR, Docking SI
Br J Sports Med 2016 Oct;50(19):1187-91. Epub 2016 Apr 28 doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2015-095422. PMID: 27127294Free PMC Article
Pollock N, James SL, Lee JC, Chakraverty R
Br J Sports Med 2014 Sep;48(18):1347-51. Epub 2014 Jul 16 doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093302. PMID: 25031367

Therapy

Barletta MA, Marino G, Spagnolo B, Bianchi FP, Falappone PCF, Spagnolo L, Gatti P
Clin Exp Med 2023 Jul;23(3):667-678. Epub 2022 Aug 22 doi: 10.1007/s10238-022-00871-8. PMID: 35994177Free PMC Article
Wang Y, Li S, Zhang Y, Chen Y, Yan F, Han L, Ma Y
Phys Ther Sport 2021 Mar;48:177-187. Epub 2021 Jan 14 doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2021.01.004. PMID: 33493991
Berger AA, Keefe J, Winnick A, Gilbert E, Eskander JP, Yazdi C, Kaye AD, Viswanath O, Urits I
Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol 2020 Sep;34(3):617-631. Epub 2020 Aug 15 doi: 10.1016/j.bpa.2020.08.010. PMID: 33004171
Geneen LJ, Moore RA, Clarke C, Martin D, Colvin LA, Smith BH
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2017 Apr 24;4(4):CD011279. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD011279.pub3. PMID: 28436583Free PMC Article
Beardsley C, Škarabot J
J Bodyw Mov Ther 2015 Oct;19(4):747-58. Epub 2015 Aug 28 doi: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2015.08.007. PMID: 26592233

Prognosis

Yang X, Hou C, Shen Y, Zhang M, Zhang K, Wang F, Liu Y, Ma X, Cheng L, Kang J, Hu B, Wang M, Zeng L, Wang Y, He Y, Cao G, Jiang J, Jones P, Cao B, Li L
JAMA Netw Open 2022 Sep 1;5(9):e2231790. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.31790. PMID: 36107425Free PMC Article
Alkodaymi MS, Omrani OA, Fawzy NA, Shaar BA, Almamlouk R, Riaz M, Obeidat M, Obeidat Y, Gerberi D, Taha RM, Kashour Z, Kashour T, Berbari EF, Alkattan K, Tleyjeh IM
Clin Microbiol Infect 2022 May;28(5):657-666. Epub 2022 Feb 3 doi: 10.1016/j.cmi.2022.01.014. PMID: 35124265Free PMC Article
Sharma SK, Jain S
Int J Rheum Dis 2018 Mar;21(3):584-601. Epub 2018 Feb 12 doi: 10.1111/1756-185X.13273. PMID: 29431292
Marin-Peña Ó, Sierra-Madrid P, Lax-Pérez R, Ferrero-Manzanal F
Hip Int 2016 May 14;26 Suppl 1:14-6. Epub 2016 May 12 doi: 10.5301/hipint.5000411. PMID: 27174060
Suhrbier A, Jaffar-Bandjee MC, Gasque P
Nat Rev Rheumatol 2012 May 8;8(7):420-9. doi: 10.1038/nrrheum.2012.64. PMID: 22565316

Clinical prediction guides

Li Q, Bao L, Liu M, Zhang R, Shi H, Chen H
Muscle Nerve 2023 Mar;67(3):231-236. Epub 2023 Jan 9 doi: 10.1002/mus.27781. PMID: 36576109
Copur B, Sayili U
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 2022 May;41(5):793-801. Epub 2022 Apr 1 doi: 10.1007/s10096-022-04436-1. PMID: 35364783
Berger JR
J Neurovirol 2020 Apr;26(2):143-148. Epub 2020 May 23 doi: 10.1007/s13365-020-00840-5. PMID: 32447630Free PMC Article
Qu C, Wu Z, Xu M, Qin F, Dong Y, Wang Z, Zhao J
J Athl Train 2020 Apr;55(4):329-335. Epub 2020 Mar 11 doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-529-18. PMID: 32160058Free PMC Article
Damas F, Libardi CA, Ugrinowitsch C
Eur J Appl Physiol 2018 Mar;118(3):485-500. Epub 2017 Dec 27 doi: 10.1007/s00421-017-3792-9. PMID: 29282529

Recent systematic reviews

Nguyen NN, Nguyen YN, Hoang VT, Million M, Gautret P
Viruses 2023 Apr 14;15(4) doi: 10.3390/v15040967. PMID: 37112949Free PMC Article
Martinho DV, Nobari H, Faria A, Field A, Duarte D, Sarmento H
Nutrients 2022 Sep 27;14(19) doi: 10.3390/nu14194002. PMID: 36235655Free PMC Article
Alkodaymi MS, Omrani OA, Fawzy NA, Shaar BA, Almamlouk R, Riaz M, Obeidat M, Obeidat Y, Gerberi D, Taha RM, Kashour Z, Kashour T, Berbari EF, Alkattan K, Tleyjeh IM
Clin Microbiol Infect 2022 May;28(5):657-666. Epub 2022 Feb 3 doi: 10.1016/j.cmi.2022.01.014. PMID: 35124265Free PMC Article
Khatri M, Naughton RJ, Clifford T, Harper LD, Corr L
Amino Acids 2021 Oct;53(10):1493-1506. Epub 2021 Sep 7 doi: 10.1007/s00726-021-03072-x. PMID: 34491424Free PMC Article
Silva JR, Rumpf MC, Hertzog M, Castagna C, Farooq A, Girard O, Hader K
Sports Med 2018 Mar;48(3):539-583. doi: 10.1007/s40279-017-0798-8. PMID: 29098658

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