U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Truncal ataxia

MedGen UID:
96535
Concept ID:
C0427190
Sign or Symptom
Synonyms: Ataxia, Truncal; Ataxias, Truncal; Truncal Ataxia; Truncal Ataxias
SNOMED CT: Truncal ataxia (250067008)
 
HPO: HP:0002078

Definition

Truncal ataxia is a sign of ataxia characterized by instability of the trunk. It usually occurs during sitting. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Dandy-Walker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4150
Concept ID:
C0010964
Disease or Syndrome
Dandy-Walker malformation is defined by hypoplasia and upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle. Affected individuals often have motor deficits such as delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia; about half have mental retardation and some have hydrocephalus. DWM is a heterogeneous disorder. The low empiric recurrence risk of approximately 1 to 2% for nonsyndromic DWM suggests that mendelian inheritance is unlikely (summary by Murray et al., 1985).
Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4886
Concept ID:
C0017495
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion disease generally manifests with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. The three major phenotypes of genetic prion disease are genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome. Although these phenotypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset typically ranges from 50 to 60 years. The disease course ranges from a few months in gCJD and FFI to a few (up to 4, and in rare cases up to 10) years in GSS syndrome.
Azorean disease
MedGen UID:
9841
Concept ID:
C0024408
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and variable findings including pyramidal signs, a dystonic-rigid extrapyramidal syndrome, significant peripheral amyotrophy and generalized areflexia, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, action-induced facial and lingual fasciculations, and bulging eyes. Neurologic findings tend to evolve as the disorder progresses.
Rett syndrome
MedGen UID:
48441
Concept ID:
C0035372
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of MECP2-related phenotypes in females ranges from classic Rett syndrome to variant Rett syndrome with a broader clinical phenotype (either milder or more severe than classic Rett syndrome) to mild learning disabilities; the spectrum in males ranges from severe neonatal encephalopathy to pyramidal signs, parkinsonism, and macroorchidism (PPM-X) syndrome to severe syndromic/nonsyndromic intellectual disability. Females: Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Males: Severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy, the most common phenotype in affected males, is characterized by a relentless clinical course that follows a metabolic-degenerative type of pattern, abnormal tone, involuntary movements, severe seizures, and breathing abnormalities. Death often occurs before age two years.
Adrenoleukodystrophy
MedGen UID:
57667
Concept ID:
C0162309
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) affects the nervous system white matter and the adrenal cortex. Three main phenotypes are seen in affected males: The childhood cerebral form manifests most commonly between ages four and eight years. It initially resembles attention-deficit disorder or hyperactivity; progressive impairment of cognition, behavior, vision, hearing, and motor function follow the initial symptoms and often lead to total disability within six months to two years. Most individuals have impaired adrenocortical function at the time that neurologic disturbances are first noted. Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) manifests most commonly in an individual in his twenties or middle age as progressive stiffness and weakness of the legs, sphincter disturbances, sexual dysfunction, and often, impaired adrenocortical function; all symptoms are progressive over decades. "Addison disease only" presents with primary adrenocortical insufficiency between age two years and adulthood and most commonly by age 7.5 years, without evidence of neurologic abnormality; however, some degree of neurologic disability (most commonly AMN) usually develops by middle age. More than 20% of female carriers develop mild-to-moderate spastic paraparesis in middle age or later. Adrenal function is usually normal.
Abortive cerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
66358
Concept ID:
C0221061
Disease or Syndrome
'Behr syndrome' is a clinical term that refers to the constellation of early-onset optic atrophy accompanied by neurologic features, including ataxia, pyramidal signs, spasticity, and mental retardation (Behr, 1909; Thomas et al., 1984). Patients with mutations in genes other than OPA1 can present with clinical features reminiscent of Behr syndrome. Mutations in one of these genes, OPA3 (606580), result in type III 3-methylglutaconic aciduria (MGCA3; 258501). Lerman-Sagie (1995) noted that the abnormal urinary pattern in MGCA3 may not be picked up by routine organic acid analysis, suggesting that early reports of Behr syndrome with normal metabolic features may actually have been 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III.
Urocanate hydratase deficiency
MedGen UID:
120644
Concept ID:
C0268514
Disease or Syndrome
An increased concentration of urocanic acid in the urine.
Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome
MedGen UID:
82815
Concept ID:
C0268540
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is a disorder of the urea cycle and ornithine degradation pathway. Clinical manifestations and age of onset vary among individuals even in the same family. Neonatal onset (~8% of affected individuals). Manifestations of hyperammonemia usually begin 24-48 hours after feeding begins and can include lethargy, somnolence, refusal to feed, vomiting, tachypnea with respiratory alkalosis, and/or seizures. Infantile, childhood, and adult onset (~92%). Affected individuals may present with: Chronic neurocognitive deficits (including developmental delay, ataxia, spasticity, learning disabilities, cognitive deficits, and/or unexplained seizures); Acute encephalopathy secondary to hyperammonemic crisis precipitated by a variety of factors; and Chronic liver dysfunction (unexplained elevation of liver transaminases with or without mild coagulopathy, with or without mild hyperammonemia and protein intolerance). Neurologic findings and cognitive abilities can continue to deteriorate despite early metabolic control that prevents hyperammonemia.
Beta-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA deacylase deficiency
MedGen UID:
83349
Concept ID:
C0342738
Disease or Syndrome
3-Hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase deficiency (HIBCHD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development, neurodegeneration, increased lactic acid, and brain lesions in the basal ganglia (summary by Ferdinandusse et al., 2013).
Neonatal pseudo-hydrocephalic progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
140806
Concept ID:
C0406586
Disease or Syndrome
Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (WDRTS) is a rare autosomal recessive neonatal progeroid disorder characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, failure to thrive, short stature, a progeroid appearance, hypotonia, and variable mental impairment (summary by Toriello, 1990). Average survival in WDRTS is 7 months, although survival into the third decade of life has been reported (Akawi et al., 2013).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1
MedGen UID:
155703
Concept ID:
C0752120
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and eventual deterioration of bulbar functions. Early in the disease, affected individuals may have gait disturbance, slurred speech, difficulty with balance, brisk deep tendon reflexes, hypermetric saccades, nystagmus, and mild dysphagia. Later signs include slowing of saccadic velocity, development of up-gaze palsy, dysmetria, dysdiadochokinesia, and hypotonia. In advanced stages, muscle atrophy, decreased deep tendon reflexes, loss of proprioception, cognitive impairment (e.g., frontal executive dysfunction, impaired verbal memory), chorea, dystonia, and bulbar dysfunction are seen. Onset is typically in the third or fourth decade, although childhood onset and late-adult onset have been reported. Those with onset after age 60 years may manifest a pure cerebellar phenotype. Interval from onset to death varies from ten to 30 years; individuals with juvenile onset show more rapid progression and more severe disease. Anticipation is observed. An axonal sensory neuropathy detected by electrophysiologic testing is common; brain imaging typically shows cerebellar and brain stem atrophy.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6
MedGen UID:
148458
Concept ID:
C0752124
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is characterized by adult-onset, slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and nystagmus. The age of onset ranges from 19 to 73 years; mean age of onset is between 43 and 52 years. Initial symptoms are gait unsteadiness, stumbling, and imbalance (in ~90%) and dysarthria (in ~10%). Eventually all persons have gait ataxia, upper-limb incoordination, intention tremor, and dysarthria. Dysphagia and choking are common. Visual disturbances may result from diplopia, difficulty fixating on moving objects, horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus, and vertical nystagmus. Hyperreflexia and extensor plantar responses occur in up to 40%-50%. Basal ganglia signs, including dystonia and blepharospasm, occur in up to 25%. Mentation is generally preserved.
Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
163239
Concept ID:
C0796274
Disease or Syndrome
Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and a variety of cranial nerve palsies, usually involving the motor components of the seventh and ninth to twelfth (more rarely the third, fifth, and sixth) cranial nerves. Spinal motor nerves and, less commonly, upper motor neurons are sometimes affected, giving a picture resembling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; 105400). The onset of the disease is usually in the second decade, but earlier and later onset have been reported. Hearing loss tends to precede the onset of neurologic signs, mostly progressive muscle weakness causing respiratory compromise. However, patients with very early onset may present with bulbar palsy and may not develop hearing loss until later. The symptoms, severity, and disease duration are variable (summary by Green et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere Syndrome See also BVVLS2 (614707), caused by mutation in the SLC52A2 gene (607882) on chromosome 8q.
Cerebellar ataxia-areflexia-pes cavus-optic atrophy-sensorineural hearing loss syndrome
MedGen UID:
318633
Concept ID:
C1832466
Disease or Syndrome
ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders represent a clinical continuum in which at least three distinct phenotypes have been delineated: rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP); alternating hemiplegia of childhood (ACH); and cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS). However, some affected individuals have intermediate phenotypes or only a few features that do not fit well into one of these major phenotypes. RDP has been characterized by: abrupt onset of dystonia over days to weeks with parkinsonism (primarily bradykinesia and postural instability); common bulbar involvement; and absence or minimal response to an adequate trial of L-dopa therapy, with few exceptions. Often fever, physiologic stress, or alcoholic binges trigger the onset of symptoms. After their initial appearance, symptoms often stabilize with little improvement; occasionally second episodes occur with abrupt worsening of symptoms. Rarely, affected individuals have reported a more gradual onset of symptoms over weeks to months. Anxiety, depression, and seizures have been reported. Age of onset ranges from four to 55 years, although a childhood variation of RDP with onset between ages nine and 14 months has been reported. AHC is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome most frequently manifesting in infancy or early childhood with paroxysmal episodic neurologic dysfunction including alternating hemiparesis or dystonia, quadriparesis, seizure-like episodes, and oculomotor abnormalities. Episodes can last for minutes, hours, days, or even weeks. Remission of symptoms occurs with sleep and immediately after awakening. Over time, persistent neurologic deficits including oculomotor apraxia, ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, parkinsonism, and cognitive and behavioral dysfunction develop in the majority of those affected; more than 50% develop epilepsy in addition to their episodic movement disorder phenotype. CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome is characterized by episodes of ataxic encephalopathy and/or weakness during and after a febrile illness. Onset is between ages six months and four years. Some acute symptoms resolve; progression of sensory losses and severity vary.
Cayman type cerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
331319
Concept ID:
C1832585
Disease or Syndrome
Cayman cerebellar ataxia (ATCAY) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by hypotonia from birth, variable psychomotor retardation, and cerebellar dysfunction, including nystagmus, intention tremor, dysarthria, ataxic gait, and truncal ataxia. Although the disorder was initially believed to be restricted to an isolated region of Grand Cayman Island (summary by Nystuen et al., 1996; Bomar et al., 2003), one Pakistani family with the disorder and an ATCAY mutation has been reported, thus expanding the ethnic distribution (Manzoor et al., 2018).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 26
MedGen UID:
373077
Concept ID:
C1836395
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare subtype of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type 3 with characteristics of late-onset and slowly progressive cerebellar signs (gait ataxia) and eye movement abnormalities. To date, only 23 affected patients have been described from one American family of Norwegian descent. Disease onset occurs between the ages of 26-60. A candidate gene has recently been identified as the eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (EEF2) gene, located on chromosome 19p13.3. Inherited autosomal dominantly.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 19/22
MedGen UID:
339504
Concept ID:
C1846367
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-19 (SCA19) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia with a variable age of onset (age 2 years to late adulthood). Other neurologic manifestations include developmental delay and cognitive impairment; movement disorders including myoclonus, dystonia, rigidity, and bradykinesia; and seizures. For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria
MedGen UID:
376107
Concept ID:
C1847352
Disease or Syndrome
Complex cortical dysplasia with other brain malformations-14A (CDCBM14A) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, motor delay, poor speech development, and early-onset seizures, often focal or atypical absence. Additional features may include strabismus, nystagmus, exo- or esotropia, axial hypotonia, and spasticity. Brain imaging shows bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria, a frontal-predominant cobblestone malformation of the cortex, scalloping of the cortical/white matter junction, enlarged ventricles, and hypoplasia of the pons, brainstem, and cerebellum. The disorder can be classified as a malformation of cortical development (summary by Parrini et al., 2009; Luo et al., 2011; Zulfiqar et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CDCBM, see CDCBM1 (614039).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 15/16
MedGen UID:
338301
Concept ID:
C1847725
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 15 (SCA15) is characterized by slowly progressive gait and limb ataxia, often in combination with ataxic dysarthria, titubation, upper limb postural tremor, mild hyperreflexia, gaze-evoked nystagmus, and impaired vestibuloocular reflex gain. Onset is between ages seven and 72 years, usually with gait ataxia but sometimes with tremor. Affected individuals remain ambulatory for ten to 54 years after symptom onset. Mild dysphagia usually after two or more decades of symptoms has been observed in members of multiple affected families and movement-induced oscillopsia has been described in one member of an affected family.
Dandy-Walker malformation-postaxial polydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
341751
Concept ID:
C1857351
Disease or Syndrome
A syndromic disorder with the association between Dandy-Walker malformation and postaxial polydactyly as a major feature. The Dandy-Walker malformation has a variable expression and characteristics of a posterior fossa cyst communicating with the fourth ventricle, the partial or complete absence of the cerebellar vermis, and facultative hydrocephalus. Postaxial polydactyly includes tetramelic postaxial polydactyly of hands and feet with possible enlargement of the fifth metacarpal and metatarsal bones, as well as bifid fifth metacarpals.
Congenital lactic acidosis, Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean type
MedGen UID:
387801
Concept ID:
C1857355
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 5 (MC4DN5) is an autosomal recessive severe metabolic multisystemic disorder with onset in infancy. Features include delayed psychomotor development, impaired intellectual development with speech delay, mild dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, ataxia, and seizures. There is increased serum lactate and episodic hypoglycemia. Some patients may have cardiomyopathy, abnormal breathing, or liver abnormalities, reflecting systemic involvement. Brain imaging shows lesions in the brainstem and basal ganglia, consistent with a diagnosis of Leigh syndrome (see 256000). Affected individuals tend to have episodic metabolic and/or neurologic crises in early childhood, which often lead to early death (summary by Debray et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 11
MedGen UID:
346799
Concept ID:
C1858351
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 11 (SCA11) is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and abnormal eye signs (jerky pursuit, horizontal and vertical nystagmus). Pyramidal features are seen on occasion. Peripheral neuropathy and dystonia are rare. Six families have been reported to date, one each from the UK, Pakistan, France, Germany, Denmark, and China. Age of onset ranged from early childhood to the mid-40s. Life span is thought to be normal.
Ataxia, early-onset, with oculomotor apraxia and hypoalbuminemia
MedGen UID:
395301
Concept ID:
C1859598
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1) is characterized by childhood onset of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, followed by oculomotor apraxia and a severe primary motor peripheral axonal motor neuropathy. The first manifestation is progressive gait imbalance (mean age of onset: 4.3 years; range: 2-10 years), followed by dysarthria, then upper-limb dysmetria with mild intention tremor. Oculomotor apraxia, usually noticed a few years after the onset of ataxia, progresses to external ophthalmoplegia. All affected individuals have generalized areflexia followed by a peripheral neuropathy and quadriplegia with loss of ambulation about seven to ten years after onset. Hands and feet are short and atrophic. Chorea and upper-limb dystonia are common. Intellect remains normal in some individuals; in others, different degrees of cognitive impairment have been observed.
Episodic ataxia type 5
MedGen UID:
356142
Concept ID:
C1866039
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare form of hereditary episodic ataxia with characteristics of recurrent episodes of vertigo and ataxia lasting several hours.
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 3
MedGen UID:
388595
Concept ID:
C2673257
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the KCTD7 gene cause a severe neurodegenerative phenotype characterized by onset of intractable myoclonic seizures before age 2 years and accompanied by developmental regression. The initial description was consistent with a form of progressive myoclonic epilepsy (designated here as EPM3), whereas a later report identified intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment storage material, consistent with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (designated CLN14). Ultrastructural findings on skin biopsies thus appear to be variable. However, clinical features are generally consistent between reports (summary by Staropoli et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, see CLN1 (256730).
Episodic ataxia type 6
MedGen UID:
390739
Concept ID:
C2675211
Disease or Syndrome
An exceedingly rare form of hereditary episodic ataxia with varying degrees of ataxia and associated findings including slurred speech, headache, confusion and hemiplegia.
15q11q13 microduplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
390767
Concept ID:
C2675336
Disease or Syndrome
Maternal 15q duplication syndrome (maternal dup15q) is characterized by hypotonia and motor delays, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and epilepsy including infantile spasms. Rarely, maternal dup15q may also be associated with psychosis or sudden unexplained death. Those with a maternal isodicentric 15q11.2-q13.1 supernumerary chromosome are typically more severely affected than those with an interstitial duplication.
Christianson syndrome
MedGen UID:
394455
Concept ID:
C2678194
Disease or Syndrome
Christianson syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview), an X-linked disorder, is characterized in males by cognitive dysfunction, behavioral disorder, and neurologic findings (e.g., seizures, ataxia, postnatal microcephaly, and eye movement abnormalities). Males with CS typically present with developmental delay, later meeting criteria for severe intellectual disability (ID). Behaviorally, autism spectrum disorder and hyperactivity are common, and may resemble the behaviors observed in Angelman syndrome. Hypotonia and oropharyngeal dysphagia in infancy may result in failure to thrive. Seizures, typically beginning before age three years, can include infantile spasms and tonic, tonic-clonic, myoclonic, and atonic seizures. Subsequently, regression (e.g., loss of ambulation and ability to feed independently) may occur. Manifestations in heterozygous females range from asymptomatic to mild ID and/or behavioral issues.
Cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, and dysequilibrium syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
412914
Concept ID:
C2750234
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar ataxia, impaired intellectual development, and dysequilibrium syndrome (CAMRQ) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital cerebellar ataxia and intellectual disability (summary by Gulsuner et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CAMRQ, see CAMRQ1 (224050).
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 9
MedGen UID:
413424
Concept ID:
C2750887
Finding
For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of idiopathic generalized epilepsy, see 600669. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsy; see 254770 for a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of JME.
Familial amyloid neuropathy
MedGen UID:
414031
Concept ID:
C2751492
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary transthyretin (ATTR) amyloidosis is characterized by a slowly progressive peripheral sensorimotor and/or autonomic neuropathy as well as non-neuropathic changes of cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, vitreous opacities, and CNS amyloidosis. The disease usually begins in the third to fifth decade in persons from endemic foci in Portugal and Japan; onset is later in persons from other areas. Typically, sensory neuropathy starts in the lower extremities with paresthesias and hypesthesias of the feet, followed within a few years by motor neuropathy. In some persons, particularly those with early-onset disease, autonomic neuropathy is the first manifestation of the condition; findings can include: orthostatic hypotension, constipation alternating with diarrhea, attacks of nausea and vomiting, delayed gastric emptying, sexual impotence, anhidrosis, and urinary retention or incontinence. Cardiac amyloidosis is mainly characterized by progressive cardiomyopathy. Individuals with leptomeningeal amyloidosis may have the following CNS findings: dementia, psychosis, visual impairment, headache, seizures, motor paresis, ataxia, myelopathy, hydrocephalus, or intracranial hemorrhage.
COG5-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
462226
Concept ID:
C3150876
Disease or Syndrome
COG5-congenital disorder of glycosylation (COG5-CDG, formerly known as congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIi) is an inherited condition that causes neurological problems and other abnormalities. The pattern and severity of this disorder's signs and symptoms vary among affected individuals.\n\nIndividuals with COG5-CDG typically develop signs and symptoms of the condition during infancy. These individuals often have weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and delayed development. Other neurological features include moderate to severe intellectual disability, poor coordination, and difficulty walking. Some affected individuals never learn to speak. Other features of COG5-CDG include short stature, an unusually small head size (microcephaly), and distinctive facial features, which can include ears that are set low and rotated backward, a short neck with a low hairline in the back, and a prominent nose. Less commonly, affected individuals can have hearing loss caused by changes in the inner ear (sensorineural hearing loss), vision impairment, damage to the nerves that control bladder function (a condition called neurogenic bladder), liver disease, and joint deformities (contractures).
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 10
MedGen UID:
462348
Concept ID:
C3150998
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-10 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with onset in the teenage or young adult years of gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, and nystagmus associated with marked cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging (summary by Vermeer et al., 2010). Some patients have low levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in muscle and may show some clinical improvement with CoQ10 treatment (Balreira et al., 2014).
N-acetylaspartate deficiency
MedGen UID:
481346
Concept ID:
C3279716
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly-cerebellar hypoplasia-cardiac conduction defect syndrome
MedGen UID:
482322
Concept ID:
C3280692
Disease or Syndrome
The Zaki-Gleeson syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by profound mental retardation, severe microcephaly, poor growth, cerebellar hypoplasia, and second-degree cardiac conduction defects (Zaki et al., 2011).
Childhood encephalopathy due to thiamine pyrophosphokinase deficiency
MedGen UID:
482496
Concept ID:
C3280866
Disease or Syndrome
Thiamine metabolism dysfunction syndrome-5 (THMD5) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to an inborn error of thiamine metabolism. The phenotype is highly variable, but in general, affected individuals have onset in early childhood of acute encephalopathic episodes associated with increased serum and CSF lactate. These episodes result in progressive neurologic dysfunction manifest as gait disturbances, ataxia, dystonia, and spasticity, which in some cases may result in loss of ability to walk. Cognitive function is usually preserved, although mildly delayed development has been reported. These episodes are usually associated with infection and metabolic decompensation. Some patients may have recovery of some neurologic deficits (Mayr et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of disorders due to thiamine metabolism dysfunction, see THMD1 (249270).
Usher syndrome type 3B
MedGen UID:
482696
Concept ID:
C3281066
Disease or Syndrome
Usher syndrome type III is characterized by postlingual, progressive hearing loss, variable vestibular dysfunction, and onset of retinitis pigmentosa symptoms, including nyctalopia, constriction of the visual fields, and loss of central visual acuity, usually by the second decade of life (Karjalainen et al., 1983; Pakarinen et al., 1995). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of type III Usher syndrome, see USH3A (276902).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 36
MedGen UID:
483339
Concept ID:
C3472711
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-36 (SCA36) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult-onset gait ataxia, eye movement abnormalities, tongue fasciculations, and variable upper motor neuron signs. Some affected individuals may develop hearing loss (summary by Garcia-Murias et al., 2012). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, and dysequilibrium syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
815307
Concept ID:
C3808977
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar ataxia, impaired intellectual development, and dysequilibrium syndrome (CAMRQ) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital cerebellar ataxia and impaired intellectual development (summary by Gulsuner et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CAMRQ, see CAMRQ1 (224050).
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 17
MedGen UID:
863738
Concept ID:
C4015301
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-17 (SCAR17) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of gait ataxia and cerebellar signs in early childhood. Patients also have variably impaired intellectual development (summary by Evers et al., 2016).
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 18
MedGen UID:
863942
Concept ID:
C4015505
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-18 is a neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, severely impaired gait due to cerebellar ataxia, ocular movement abnormalities, and intellectual disability. Brain imaging shows progressive cerebellar atrophy (summary by Hills et al., 2013).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 1
MedGen UID:
897191
Concept ID:
C4225153
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Microcephaly, short stature, and impaired glucose metabolism 2
MedGen UID:
906140
Concept ID:
C4225195
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, short stature, and impaired glucose metabolism-2 (MSSGM2) is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly associated with impaired intellectual development, and short stature. Patients develop diabetes in the second or third decade of life, and hypothyroidism and delayed puberty have also been reported (Abdulkarim et al., 2015; Kernohan et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of microcephaly, short stature, and impaired glucose metabolism, see MSSGM1 (616033).
Hypotonia, ataxia, and delayed development syndrome
MedGen UID:
934585
Concept ID:
C4310618
Disease or Syndrome
EBF3 neurodevelopmental disorder (EBF3-NDD) is associated with developmental delay (DD) / intellectual disability (ID), speech delay, gait or truncal ataxia, hypotonia, behavioral problems, and facial dysmorphism. Variability between individuals with EBF3-NDD is significant. Although all affected children have DD noted in early infancy, intellect generally ranges from mild to severe ID, with two individuals functioning in the low normal range. Less common issues can include genitourinary abnormalities and gastrointestinal and/or musculoskeletal involvement. To date, 42 symptomatic individuals from 39 families have been reported.
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 22
MedGen UID:
934748
Concept ID:
C4310781
Disease or Syndrome
Any autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the VWA3B gene.
Dias-Logan syndrome
MedGen UID:
934800
Concept ID:
C4310833
Disease or Syndrome
BCL11A-related intellectual disability (BCL11A-ID) is characterized by developmental delay / intellectual disability of variable degree, neonatal hypotonia, microcephaly, distinctive but variable facial characteristics, behavior problems, and asymptomatic persistence of fetal hemoglobin. Growth delay, seizures, and autism spectrum disorder have also been reported in some affected individuals.
Spastic ataxia 8, autosomal recessive, with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy
MedGen UID:
1382553
Concept ID:
C4479653
Disease or Syndrome
NKX6-2-related disorder is characterized by a spectrum of progressive neurologic manifestations resulting from diffuse central nervous system hypomyelination. At the severe end of the spectrum is neonatal-onset nystagmus, severe spastic tetraplegia with joint contractures and scoliosis, and visual and hearing impairment, all of which rapidly progress resulting in death in early childhood. At the milder end of the spectrum is normal achievement of early motor milestones in the first year of life followed by slowly progressive complex spastic ataxia with pyramidal findings (spasticity with increased muscle tone and difficulty with gait and fine motor coordination) and cerebellar findings (nystagmus, extraocular movement disorder, dysarthria, titubation, and ataxia) with loss of developmental milestones. To date NKX6-2-related disorder has been reported in 25 individuals from 13 families.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type R18
MedGen UID:
1385598
Concept ID:
C4517996
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-18 (LGMD18) is characterized by childhood-onset of proximal muscle weakness resulting in gait abnormalities and scapular winging. Serum creatine kinase is increased. A subset of patients may show a hyperkinetic movement disorder with chorea, ataxia, or dystonia and global developmental delay (summary by Bogershausen et al., 2013). Additional more variable features include alacrima, achalasia, cataracts, or hepatic steatosis (Liang et al., 2015; Koehler et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 25
MedGen UID:
1618081
Concept ID:
C4539808
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial myopathy-cerebellar ataxia-pigmentary retinopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1620960
Concept ID:
C4540096
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial myopathy and ataxia (MMYAT) is an autosomal recessive mtDNA depletion disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, congenital muscle involvement with histologic findings ranging from myopathic to dystrophic, and pigmentary retinopathy (summary by Donkervoort et al., 2019).
Joubert syndrome 31
MedGen UID:
1618082
Concept ID:
C4540355
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, and dysequilibrium syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1639436
Concept ID:
C4551552
Disease or Syndrome
VLDLR cerebellar hypoplasia (VLDLR-CH) is characterized by non-progressive congenital ataxia that is predominantly truncal and results in delayed ambulation, moderate-to-profound intellectual disability, dysarthria, strabismus, and seizures. Children either learn to walk very late (often after age 6 years) or never achieve independent ambulation. Brain MRI findings include hypoplasia of the inferior portion of the cerebellar vermis and hemispheres, simplified gyration of the cerebral hemispheres, and small brain stem – particularly the pons.
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 28
MedGen UID:
1648493
Concept ID:
C4748827
Disease or Syndrome
Mega-corpus-callosum syndrome with cerebellar hypoplasia and cortical malformations
MedGen UID:
1648439
Concept ID:
C4748927
Disease or Syndrome
Mega-corpus-callosum syndrome with cerebellar hypoplasia and cortical malformations (MCCCHCM) is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, and characteristic brain abnormalities on brain imaging. Affected individuals have enlargement of the corpus callosum, enlarged ventricles, and cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia. Other features may include lack of speech development, gait instability, and seizures. Some patients with MAST1 mutations may have impaired intellectual development and/or autism spectrum disorder without significant findings on brain imaging (summary by Tripathy et al., 2018).
Ferro-cerebro-cutaneous syndrome
MedGen UID:
1658844
Concept ID:
C4751570
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic metabolic liver disease with characteristics of progressive neurodegeneration, cutaneous abnormalities including varying degrees of ichthyosis or seborrheic dermatitis, and systemic iron overload. Patients manifest with infantile-onset seizures, encephalopathy, abnormal eye movements, axial hypotonia with peripheral hypertonia, brisk reflexes, cortical blindness and deafness, myoclonus and hepato/splenomegaly, as well as oral manifestations including microdontia, widely spaced and pointed teeth with delayed eruption and gingival overgrowth.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 16
MedGen UID:
1674542
Concept ID:
C5190574
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-16 (SCAR16) is a progressive neurologic disorder characterized by truncal and limb ataxia, resulting in gait instability, associated with cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. Most patients have onset in the teenage years, although earlier and later onset have been reported. Additional features may include dysarthria, nystagmus, hyperreflexia of the lower limbs, and mild peripheral sensory neuropathy. Some patients have gonadal dysfunction or hypogonadism and/or cognitive deficits. The phenotype represents a spectrum or continuum of neurodegenerative features that may overlap with those of SCA48 (summary by Shi et al., 2013 and Ravel et al., 2021).
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 11
MedGen UID:
1681191
Concept ID:
C5190803
Disease or Syndrome
A rare hereditary cerebellar ataxia disorder with characteristics of late-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, manifesting with slowly progressive gait disturbances, dysarthria, limb and truncal ataxia and smooth-pursuit eye movement disturbance, associated with a history of psychomotor delay from childhood. Mild atrophy of the cerebellar vermis and hemispheres is observed on brain imaging. There is evidence the disease is caused by homozygous mutation in the SYT14 gene on chromosome 1q32.
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 8
MedGen UID:
1680582
Concept ID:
C5190825
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy-8 (EPM8) is a rare autosomal recessive form of progressive myoclonic epilepsy with phenotypic variability including ataxia and other movement disorders in addition to myoclonus (summary by Godeiro et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Intellectual developmental disorder 60 with seizures
MedGen UID:
1684702
Concept ID:
C5231497
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-60 with seizures is characterized by global developmental delay apparent in infancy, followed by onset of seizures in the first years of life. Patients have delayed walking, an ataxic gait, and moderately to severely impaired intellectual development with poor speech (summary by Helbig et al., 2019).
Leukoencephalopathy, developmental delay, and episodic neurologic regression syndrome
MedGen UID:
1719567
Concept ID:
C5394367
Disease or Syndrome
Leukoencephalopathy, developmental delay, and episodic neurologic regression syndrome (LEUDEN) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent in early childhood, followed by episodic neurologic regression or decompensation associated with systemic stress, such as febrile infection. Affected individuals have hypotonia, gait difficulties or ataxia, poor or absent speech with dysarthria, and variable motor abnormalities, including spasticity, dystonia, extrapyramidal signs, and tremor. Many patients have seizures. Brain imaging shows diffuse white matter abnormalities, poor myelination, thin corpus callosum, and generalized cerebral atrophy with enlarged ventricles. The clinical features of the disorder and the abnormal brain imaging findings are progressive (summary by Mao et al., 2020).
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency, nuclear type 1
MedGen UID:
1750917
Concept ID:
C5435656
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 1 (MC4DN1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by rapidly progressive neurodegeneration and encephalopathy with loss of motor and cognitive skills between about 5 and 18 months of age after normal early development. Affected individuals show hypotonia, failure to thrive, loss of the ability to sit or walk, poor communication, and poor eye contact. Other features may include oculomotor abnormalities, including slow saccades, strabismus, ophthalmoplegia, and nystagmus, as well as deafness, apneic episodes, ataxia, tremor, and brisk tendon reflexes. Brain imaging shows bilateral symmetric lesions in the basal ganglia, consistent with a clinical diagnosis of Leigh syndrome (see 256000). Some patients may also have abnormalities in the brainstem and cerebellum. Laboratory studies usually show increased serum and CSF lactate and decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV in patient tissues. There is phenotypic variability, but death in childhood, often due to central respiratory failure, is common (summary by Tiranti et al., 1998; Tiranti et al., 1999; Teraoka et al., 1999; Poyau et al., 2000) Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex IV Deficiency Most isolated COX deficiencies are inherited as autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in nuclear-encoded genes; mutations in the mtDNA-encoded COX subunit genes are relatively rare (Shoubridge, 2001; Sacconi et al., 2003). Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency caused by mutation in nuclear-encoded genes, in addition to MC4DN1, include MC4DN2 (604377), caused by mutation in the SCO2 gene (604272); MC4DN3 (619046), caused by mutation in the COX10 gene (602125); MC4DN4 (619048), caused by mutation in the SCO1 gene (603664); MC4DN5 (220111), caused by mutation in the LRPPRC gene (607544); MC4DN6 (615119), caused by mutation in the COX15 gene (603646); MC4DN7 (619051), caused by mutation in the COX6B1 gene (124089); MC4DN8 (619052), caused by mutation in the TACO1 gene (612958); MC4DN9 (616500), caused by mutation in the COA5 gene (613920); MC4DN10 (619053), caused by mutation in the COX14 gene (614478); MC4DN11 (619054), caused by mutation in the COX20 gene (614698); MC4DN12 (619055), caused by mutation in the PET100 gene (614770); MC4DN13 (616501), caused by mutation in the COA6 gene (614772); MC4DN14 (619058), caused by mutation in the COA3 gene (614775); MC4DN15 (619059), caused by mutation in the COX8A gene (123870); MC4DN16 (619060), caused by mutation in the COX4I1 gene (123864); MC4DN17 (619061), caused by mutation in the APOPT1 gene (616003); MC4DN18 (619062), caused by mutation in the COX6A2 gene (602009); MC4DN19 (619063), caused by mutation in the PET117 gene (614771); MC4DN20 (619064), caused by mutation in the COX5A gene (603773); MC4DN21 (619065), caused by mutation in the COXFA4 gene (603883); MC4DN22 (619355), caused by mutation in the COX16 gene (618064); and MC4DN23 (620275), caused by mutation in the COX11 gene (603648). Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency has been associated with mutations in several mitochondrial genes, including MTCO1 (516030), MTCO2 (516040), MTCO3 (516050), MTTS1 (590080), MTTL1 (590050), and MTTN (590010).
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 7
MedGen UID:
1754683
Concept ID:
C5436685
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 7 (MC4DN7) is an autosomal recessive metabolic encephalomyopathic disorder with highly variable manifestations. Only a few patients have been reported. Some patients have normal early development then show rapid neurodegeneration with progressive muscle weakness, gait disturbances, and cognitive decline in mid to late childhood. Other features may include seizures and visual impairment. Brain imaging shows progressive leukodystrophy with cystic lesions. In contrast, at least 1 patient has been reported who presented in the neonatal period with metabolic acidosis, hydrocephalus, hypotonia, and cortical blindness. This patient developed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy resulting in early death. All patients had increased serum lactate and decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV (summary by Massa et al., 2008 and Abdulhag et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with cardiomyopathy, spasticity, and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1750805
Concept ID:
C5436848
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with cardiomyopathy, spasticity, and brain abnormalities (NEDCASB) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic disorder characterized by global neurodevelopmental delay, severely impaired intellectual development, poor overall growth, and spasticity of the lower limbs resulting in gait difficulties. Most affected individuals also develop progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in childhood or have cardiac developmental anomalies. Additional more variable features include dysmorphic facies and axonal sensory peripheral neuropathy. Brain imaging tends to show thin corpus callosum and polymicrogyria (summary by Garcia-Cazorla et al., 2020).
Neurodegeneration with ataxia and late-onset optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
1779901
Concept ID:
C5543254
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodegeneration with ataxia and late-onset optic atrophy (NDAXOA) is an autosomal dominant disorder with somewhat variable manifestations. Most affected individuals present in mid-adulthood with slowly progressive cerebellar and gait ataxia, optic atrophy, and myopathy or myalgia. Some patients may have a childhood history of neurologic features, including limited extraocular movements. Additional features can include cardiomyopathy, psychiatric disturbances, and peripheral sensory impairment (summary by Taylor et al., 1996 and Courage et al., 2017).
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency, nuclear type 1
MedGen UID:
1814582
Concept ID:
C5700310
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency is an autosomal recessive multisystemic metabolic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Some patients have multisystem involvement of the brain, heart, and muscle with onset in infancy, whereas others have only isolated cardiac or muscle involvement. Measurement of complex II activity in muscle is the most reliable means of diagnosis; however, there is no clear correlation between residual complex II activity and severity or clinical outcome. In some cases, treatment with riboflavin may have clinical benefit (summary by Jain-Ghai et al., 2013). Complex II, also known as succinate dehydrogenase, is part of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex II Deficiency See MC2DN2 (619166), caused by mutation in the SDHAF1 gene (612848) on chromosome 19q13; MC2DN3 (619167), caused by mutation in the SDHD gene (602690) on chromosome 11q23; and MC2DN4 (619224), caused by mutation in the SDHB gene (185470) on chromosome 1p36. Fullerton et al. (2020) reviewed the genetic basis of isolated mitochondrial complex II deficiency.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, cerebral atrophy, and visual impairment
MedGen UID:
1823998
Concept ID:
C5774225
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, cerebral atrophy, and visual impairment (NEDMVIC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, facial dysmorphism, and microcephaly (Ziegler et al., 2022).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 33
MedGen UID:
1824070
Concept ID:
C5774297
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-33 (SCAR33) is a neurologic disorder characterized by delayed motor development apparent in infancy, unsteady ataxic gait, intention tremor, nystagmus, and speech delay with dysarthria. Some patients have seizures and/or learning difficulties. Brain imaging shows cerebellar hypoplasia (Elsaid et al., 2017).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Tangeraas T, Constante JR, Backe PH, Oyarzábal A, Neugebauer J, Weinhold N, Boemer F, Debray FG, Ozturk-Hism B, Evren G, Tuba EF, Ummuhan O, Footitt E, Davison J, Martinez C, Bueno C, Machado I, Rodríguez-Pombo P, Al-Sannaa N, De Los Santos M, López JM, Ozturkmen-Akay H, Karaca M, Tekin M, Pajares S, Ormazabal A, Stoway SD, Artuch R, Dixon M, Mørkrid L, García-Cazorla A
Brain 2023 Jul 3;146(7):3003-3013. doi: 10.1093/brain/awad010. PMID: 36729635
Thompson R, Bhatti DE, Hellman A, Doss SJ, Malgireddy K, Shou J, Srikanth-Mysore C, Bendi S, Bertoni JM, Torres-Russotto D
Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov (N Y) 2020 Dec 16;10:54. doi: 10.5334/tohm.570. PMID: 33362948Free PMC Article
Takahashi M, Shinya A, Choh Y, Itaya S, Inaba A, Orimo S
J Vis Exp 2019 Sep 19;(151) doi: 10.3791/59330. PMID: 31609320

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Pelletier J, Koyfman A, Long B
J Emerg Med 2023 Nov;65(5):e414-e426. Epub 2023 Jul 20 doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2023.07.007. PMID: 37806810
Carmona S, Martínez C, Zalazar G, Koohi N, Kaski D
Eur J Neurol 2023 Jun;30(6):1785-1790. Epub 2023 Mar 1 doi: 10.1111/ene.15729. PMID: 36752029
Thompson R, Bhatti DE, Hellman A, Doss SJ, Malgireddy K, Shou J, Srikanth-Mysore C, Bendi S, Bertoni JM, Torres-Russotto D
Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov (N Y) 2020 Dec 16;10:54. doi: 10.5334/tohm.570. PMID: 33362948Free PMC Article
Rino Y, Oshima T, Yoshikawa T
Surg Today 2017 Feb;47(2):145-150. Epub 2016 May 25 doi: 10.1007/s00595-016-1341-5. PMID: 27226020
Miyai I, Ito M, Hattori N, Mihara M, Hatakenaka M, Yagura H, Sobue G, Nishizawa M; Cerebellar Ataxia Rehabilitation Trialists Collaboration
Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2012 Jun;26(5):515-22. Epub 2011 Dec 2 doi: 10.1177/1545968311425918. PMID: 22140200

Diagnosis

Pelletier J, Koyfman A, Long B
J Emerg Med 2023 Nov;65(5):e414-e426. Epub 2023 Jul 20 doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2023.07.007. PMID: 37806810
Shah VP, Oliveira J E Silva L, Farah W, Seisa MO, Balla AK, Christensen A, Farah M, Hasan B, Bellolio F, Murad MH
Acad Emerg Med 2023 May;30(5):552-578. Epub 2023 Jan 22 doi: 10.1111/acem.14630. PMID: 36453134
Kattah JC, Zalazar G, Martinez C, Carmona S
J Neurol Sci 2022 Oct 15;441:120375. Epub 2022 Aug 10 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2022.120375. PMID: 35988348
Miyai I, Ito M, Hattori N, Mihara M, Hatakenaka M, Yagura H, Sobue G, Nishizawa M; Cerebellar Ataxia Rehabilitation Trialists Collaboration
Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2012 Jun;26(5):515-22. Epub 2011 Dec 2 doi: 10.1177/1545968311425918. PMID: 22140200
Dreyer WB Jr, Zegarra H, Zakov ZN, Gutman FA
Am J Ophthalmol 1981 Dec;92(6):816-23. doi: 10.1016/s0002-9394(14)75636-3. PMID: 7315933

Therapy

Alemseged F, Rocco A, Arba F, Schwabova JP, Wu T, Cavicchia L, Ng F, Ng JL, Zhao H, Williams C, Sallustio F, Balabanski AH, Tomek A, Parson MW, Mitchell PJ, Diomedi M, Yassi N, Churilov L, Davis SM, Campbell BCV; Basilar Artery Treatment and Management (BATMAN) Collaboration Investigators
Stroke 2022 Apr;53(4):1247-1255. Epub 2021 Dec 15 doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.034019. PMID: 34905944
Dean D, Passalacqua KD, Dolcourt B
J Med Toxicol 2021 Jul;17(3):309-311. Epub 2021 Jun 1 doi: 10.1007/s13181-021-00847-2. PMID: 34075549Free PMC Article
Imataka G, Wake K, Yoshihara S
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci 2020 Oct;24(20):10708-10711. doi: 10.26355/eurrev_202010_23430. PMID: 33155230
Miyai I, Ito M, Hattori N, Mihara M, Hatakenaka M, Yagura H, Sobue G, Nishizawa M; Cerebellar Ataxia Rehabilitation Trialists Collaboration
Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2012 Jun;26(5):515-22. Epub 2011 Dec 2 doi: 10.1177/1545968311425918. PMID: 22140200
Dreyer WB Jr, Zegarra H, Zakov ZN, Gutman FA
Am J Ophthalmol 1981 Dec;92(6):816-23. doi: 10.1016/s0002-9394(14)75636-3. PMID: 7315933

Prognosis

Pelletier J, Koyfman A, Long B
J Emerg Med 2023 Nov;65(5):e414-e426. Epub 2023 Jul 20 doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2023.07.007. PMID: 37806810
Dean D, Passalacqua KD, Dolcourt B
J Med Toxicol 2021 Jul;17(3):309-311. Epub 2021 Jun 1 doi: 10.1007/s13181-021-00847-2. PMID: 34075549Free PMC Article
McLendon LA, Rao CK, Da Hora CC, Islamovic F, Galan FN
Pediatrics 2021 Jun;147(6) Epub 2021 Mar 24 doi: 10.1542/peds.2020-049678. PMID: 33762311
Miyai I, Ito M, Hattori N, Mihara M, Hatakenaka M, Yagura H, Sobue G, Nishizawa M; Cerebellar Ataxia Rehabilitation Trialists Collaboration
Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2012 Jun;26(5):515-22. Epub 2011 Dec 2 doi: 10.1177/1545968311425918. PMID: 22140200
Dreyer WB Jr, Zegarra H, Zakov ZN, Gutman FA
Am J Ophthalmol 1981 Dec;92(6):816-23. doi: 10.1016/s0002-9394(14)75636-3. PMID: 7315933

Clinical prediction guides

Carmona S, Martínez C, Zalazar G, Koohi N, Kaski D
Eur J Neurol 2023 Jun;30(6):1785-1790. Epub 2023 Mar 1 doi: 10.1111/ene.15729. PMID: 36752029
Tangeraas T, Constante JR, Backe PH, Oyarzábal A, Neugebauer J, Weinhold N, Boemer F, Debray FG, Ozturk-Hism B, Evren G, Tuba EF, Ummuhan O, Footitt E, Davison J, Martinez C, Bueno C, Machado I, Rodríguez-Pombo P, Al-Sannaa N, De Los Santos M, López JM, Ozturkmen-Akay H, Karaca M, Tekin M, Pajares S, Ormazabal A, Stoway SD, Artuch R, Dixon M, Mørkrid L, García-Cazorla A
Brain 2023 Jul 3;146(7):3003-3013. doi: 10.1093/brain/awad010. PMID: 36729635
Dean D, Passalacqua KD, Dolcourt B
J Med Toxicol 2021 Jul;17(3):309-311. Epub 2021 Jun 1 doi: 10.1007/s13181-021-00847-2. PMID: 34075549Free PMC Article
Ghali MGZ
Neurosurg Rev 2021 Feb;44(1):61-76. Epub 2019 Dec 5 doi: 10.1007/s10143-019-01190-5. PMID: 31807931
Dreyer WB Jr, Zegarra H, Zakov ZN, Gutman FA
Am J Ophthalmol 1981 Dec;92(6):816-23. doi: 10.1016/s0002-9394(14)75636-3. PMID: 7315933

Recent systematic reviews

Bui N, Kuo C, Brown NJ, Dzihic E, Gendreau J, Patel NA, Patel S, Koester SW, Singh R, Abraham ME, Mammis A
World Neurosurg 2023 Jul;175:e167-e173. Epub 2023 Mar 15 doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2023.03.046. PMID: 36924887
Shah VP, Oliveira J E Silva L, Farah W, Seisa MO, Balla AK, Christensen A, Farah M, Hasan B, Bellolio F, Murad MH
Acad Emerg Med 2023 May;30(5):552-578. Epub 2023 Jan 22 doi: 10.1111/acem.14630. PMID: 36453134

Supplemental Content

Table of contents

    Clinical resources

    Practice guidelines

    • PubMed
      See practice and clinical guidelines in PubMed. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.
    • Bookshelf
      See practice and clinical guidelines in NCBI Bookshelf. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.

    Consumer resources

    Recent activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...