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Developmental cataract

MedGen UID:
3202
Concept ID:
C0009691
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: Congenital cataract; Congenital cataracts
SNOMED CT: Congenital cataract (79410001)
 
HPO: HP:0000519

Definition

A cataract that occurs congenitally as the result of a developmental defect, in contrast to the majority of cataracts that occur in adulthood as the result of degenerative changes of the lens. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome
MedGen UID:
6222
Concept ID:
C0024814
Disease or Syndrome
Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is characterized by cerebellar ataxia with cerebellar atrophy, dysarthria, nystagmus, early-onset (not necessarily congenital) cataracts, myopathy, muscle weakness, and hypotonia. Additional features may include psychomotor delay, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, short stature, and various skeletal abnormalities. Children with MSS usually present with muscular hypotonia in early infancy; distal and proximal muscular weakness is noticed during the first decade of life. Later, cerebellar findings of truncal ataxia, dysdiadochokinesia, nystagmus, and dysarthria become apparent. Motor function worsens progressively for some years, then stabilizes at an unpredictable age and degree of severity. Cataracts can develop rapidly and typically require lens extraction in the first decade of life. Although many adults have severe disabilities, life span in MSS appears to be near normal.
Lowe syndrome
MedGen UID:
18145
Concept ID:
C0028860
Disease or Syndrome
Lowe syndrome (oculocerebrorenal syndrome) is characterized by involvement of the eyes, central nervous system, and kidneys. Dense congenital cataracts are found in all affected boys and infantile glaucoma in approximately 50%. All boys have impaired vision; corrected acuity is rarely better than 20/100. Generalized hypotonia is noted at birth and is of central (brain) origin. Deep tendon reflexes are usually absent. Hypotonia may slowly improve with age, but normal motor tone and strength are never achieved. Motor milestones are delayed. Almost all affected males have some degree of intellectual disability; 10%-25% function in the low-normal or borderline range, approximately 25% in the mild-to-moderate range, and 50%-65% in the severe-to-profound range of intellectual disability. Affected males have varying degrees of proximal renal tubular dysfunction of the Fanconi type, including low molecular-weight (LMW) proteinuria, aminoaciduria, bicarbonate wasting and renal tubular acidosis, phosphaturia with hypophosphatemia and renal rickets, hypercalciuria, sodium and potassium wasting, and polyuria. The features of symptomatic Fanconi syndrome do not usually become manifest until after the first few months of life, except for LMW proteinuria. Glomerulosclerosis associated with chronic tubular injury usually results in slowly progressive chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease between the second and fourth decades of life.
Pheochromocytoma
MedGen UID:
18419
Concept ID:
C0031511
Neoplastic Process
Hereditary paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma (PGL/PCC) syndromes are characterized by paragangliomas (tumors that arise from neuroendocrine tissues distributed along the paravertebral axis from the base of the skull to the pelvis) and pheochromocytomas (paragangliomas that are confined to the adrenal medulla). Sympathetic paragangliomas cause catecholamine excess; parasympathetic paragangliomas are most often nonsecretory. Extra-adrenal parasympathetic paragangliomas are located predominantly in the skull base and neck (referred to as head and neck PGL [HNPGL]) and sometimes in the upper mediastinum; approximately 95% of such tumors are nonsecretory. In contrast, sympathetic extra-adrenal paragangliomas are generally confined to the lower mediastinum, abdomen, and pelvis, and are typically secretory. Pheochromocytomas, which arise from the adrenal medulla, typically lead to catecholamine excess. Symptoms of PGL/PCC result from either mass effects or catecholamine hypersecretion (e.g., sustained or paroxysmal elevations in blood pressure, headache, episodic profuse sweating, forceful palpitations, pallor, and apprehension or anxiety). The risk for developing metastatic disease is greater for extra-adrenal sympathetic paragangliomas than for pheochromocytomas.
Juvenile myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis AND stroke
MedGen UID:
56485
Concept ID:
C0162671
Disease or Syndrome
MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) is a multisystem disorder with protean manifestations. The vast majority of affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of MELAS between ages two and 40 years. Common clinical manifestations include stroke-like episodes, encephalopathy with seizures and/or dementia, muscle weakness and exercise intolerance, normal early psychomotor development, recurrent headaches, recurrent vomiting, hearing impairment, peripheral neuropathy, learning disability, and short stature. During the stroke-like episodes neuroimaging shows increased T2-weighted signal areas that do not correspond to the classic vascular distribution (hence the term "stroke-like"). Lactic acidemia is very common and muscle biopsies typically show ragged red fibers.
Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
75696
Concept ID:
C0268596
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) represents a clinical spectrum in which presentations can be divided into type I (neonatal onset with congenital anomalies), type II (neonatal onset without congenital anomalies), and type III (late onset). Individuals with type I or II MADD typically become symptomatic in the neonatal period with severe metabolic acidosis, which may be accompanied by profound hypoglycemia and hyperammonemia. Many affected individuals die in the newborn period despite metabolic treatment. In those who survive the neonatal period, recurrent metabolic decompensation resembling Reye syndrome and the development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can occur. Congenital anomalies may include dysmorphic facial features, large cystic kidneys, hypospadias and chordee in males, and neuronal migration defects (heterotopias) on brain MRI. Individuals with type III MADD, the most common presentation, can present from infancy to adulthood. The most common symptoms are muscle weakness, exercise intolerance, and/or muscle pain, although metabolic decompensation with episodes of rhabdomyolysis can also be seen. Rarely, individuals with late-onset MADD (type III) may develop severe sensory neuropathy in addition to proximal myopathy.
Pupillary membrane, persistence of
MedGen UID:
124386
Concept ID:
C0271130
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital blue dot cataract
MedGen UID:
138007
Concept ID:
C0344523
Congenital Abnormality
Cerulean cataract, first described by Vogt (1922), is an autosomal dominant, early-onset, bilateral cataract with complete penetrance. Newborns appear asymptomatic until the age of 18 to 24 months, at which time they can be clinically diagnosed by slit-lamp examination through the appearance of tiny blue or white opacities that form first in the superficial layers of the fetal lens nucleus. The opacities progress throughout the adult lens nucleus and the cortex, forming concentric layers, with central lesions oriented radially. Histologically the lesions appear to be tapered cavities between lens fibers. Progression of the cataract is slow, such that patients may have lens extractions between the ages of 16 and 35 years (Armitage et al., 1995). The preferred title/symbol of this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Congenital, Cerulean Type, 1; CCA1.'
Irido-corneo-trabecular dysgenesis
MedGen UID:
91031
Concept ID:
C0344559
Congenital Abnormality
Anterior segment dysgeneses (ASGD or ASMD) are a heterogeneous group of developmental disorders affecting the anterior segment of the eye, including the cornea, iris, lens, trabecular meshwork, and Schlemm canal. The clinical features of ASGD include iris hypoplasia, an enlarged or reduced corneal diameter, corneal vascularization and opacity, posterior embryotoxon, corectopia, polycoria, an abnormal iridocorneal angle, ectopia lentis, and anterior synechiae between the iris and posterior corneal surface (summary by Cheong et al., 2016). Anterior segment dysgenesis is sometimes divided into subtypes including aniridia (see 106210), Axenfeld and Rieger anomalies, iridogoniodysgenesis, Peters anomaly, and posterior embryotoxon (Gould and John, 2002). Patients with ASGD5 have been reported with the Peters anomaly, Axenfeld anomaly, and Rieger anomaly subtypes. Peters anomaly consists of a central corneal leukoma, absence of the posterior corneal stroma and Descemet membrane, and a variable degree of iris and lenticular attachments to the central aspect of the posterior cornea (Peters, 1906). It occurs as an isolated ocular abnormality or in association with other ocular defects. In Axenfeld anomaly, strands of iris tissue attach to the Schwalbe line; in Rieger anomaly, in addition to the attachment of iris tissue to the Schwalbe line, there is clinically evident iris stromal atrophy with hole or pseudo-hole formation and corectopia (summary by Smith and Traboulsi, 2012).
Cockayne syndrome type 2
MedGen UID:
155487
Concept ID:
C0751038
Disease or Syndrome
Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a continuous phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or "moderate" form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal (COFS) syndrome; CS type III, a milder and later-onset form; COFS syndrome, a fetal form of CS. CS type I is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age five years. CS type III is a phenotype in which major clinical features associated with CS only become apparent after age two years; growth and/or cognition exceeds the expectations for CS type I. COFS syndrome is characterized by very severe prenatal developmental anomalies (arthrogryposis and microphthalmia).
Cataract-nephropathy-encephalopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
167082
Concept ID:
C0795914
Disease or Syndrome
A lethal combination of manifestations including short stature, congenital cataracts, encephalopathy with epileptic fits and postmortem confirmation of nephropathy (renal tubular necrosis). The combination has been described in 2 female infant children of first cousin parents. The infants did not survive beyond 4 and 8 months respectively. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1963.
Nance-Horan syndrome
MedGen UID:
208665
Concept ID:
C0796085
Disease or Syndrome
Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, dental anomalies, dysmorphic features, and, in some cases, mental retardation (summary by Burdon et al., 2003).
Cataract-ataxia-deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
163216
Concept ID:
C0796123
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic disease characterized by mild intellectual deficit, congenital cataract, progressive sensorineural hearing impairment, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, and short stature. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1991.
Islet cell adenomatosis
MedGen UID:
293643
Concept ID:
C1578917
Neoplastic Process
Insulinomatosis and diabetes mellitus syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder in which affected individuals within a family present with either hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, or a noninsulin-dependent form of diabetes mellitus. A few affected individuals show only impaired glucose tolerance. Some patients also exhibit congenital cataract and/or congenital glaucoma (Iacovazzo et al., 2018).
Cataract 3 multiple types
MedGen UID:
321901
Concept ID:
C1832175
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYBB2 gene have been found to cause several types of cataract, which have been described as congenital cerulean, 'blue dot,' Coppock-like, sutural with punctate and cerulean opacities, pulverulent embryonal, pulverulent with cortical opacities, dense posterior star-shaped subcapsular with pulverulent opacities in the cortical and embryonal regions, and dense embryonal. Before it was known that mutations in the CRYBB2 gene cause several types of cataract, the preferred title of this entry was 'Cataract, Congenital, Cerulean Type 2,' with the symbol CCA2.
Ayme-Gripp syndrome
MedGen UID:
371416
Concept ID:
C1832812
Disease or Syndrome
Aymé-Gripp syndrome is classically defined as the triad of bilateral early cataracts, sensorineural hearing loss, and characteristic facial features in combination with neurodevelopmental abnormalities. The facial features are often described as "Down syndrome-like" and include brachycephaly, flat facial appearance, short nose, long philtrum, narrow mouth, and low-set and posteriorly rotated ears. Hearing loss is often congenital. Other features may include postnatal short stature, seizure disorder, nonspecific brain abnormalities on head imaging, skeletal abnormalities, and joint limitations. A subset of individuals have been found to have pericarditis or pericardial effusion during the neonatal or infantile period. All affected individuals have had developmental delay, but the degree of cognitive impairment is extremely variable. Other features including gastrointestinal and endocrine abnormalities, ectodermal dysplasia (i.e., nail dystrophy and mammary gland hypoplasia), dental anomalies, and chronic glomerulopathy with proteinuria have been reported in rare affected individuals.
Cataract 10 multiple types
MedGen UID:
318817
Concept ID:
C1833229
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYBA1 gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as congenital zonular with sutural opacities, congenital nuclear progressive, and progressive lamellar. The preferred title/symbol of this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Congenital Zonular, with Sutural Opacities; CCZS.'
HEC syndrome
MedGen UID:
331549
Concept ID:
C1833607
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome that is characterized by communicating hydrocephalus, endocardial fibroelastosis and congenital cataracts. It has been described in two children, both of whom died a few months after birth (the first as a result of a respiratory infection and the second due to cardiac complications). The etiology of the syndrome is unknown but a viral or genetic origin has been proposed.
CODAS syndrome
MedGen UID:
333031
Concept ID:
C1838180
Disease or Syndrome
CODAS is an acronym for cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, and skeletal anomalies. CODAS syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by a distinctive constellation of features that includes developmental delay, craniofacial anomalies, cataracts, ptosis, median nasal groove, delayed tooth eruption, hearing loss, short stature, delayed epiphyseal ossification, metaphyseal hip dysplasia, and vertebral coronal clefts (summary by Strauss et al., 2015).
Warburg micro syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
333142
Concept ID:
C1838625
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Cataract, congenital, with mental impairment and dentate gyrus atrophy
MedGen UID:
334365
Concept ID:
C1843257
Disease or Syndrome
Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome
MedGen UID:
337547
Concept ID:
C1846265
Disease or Syndrome
Oculofaciocardiodental (OFCD) syndrome is a condition that affects the development of the eyes (oculo-), facial features (facio-), heart (cardio-) and teeth (dental). This condition occurs only in females.\n\nThe eye abnormalities associated with OFCD syndrome can affect one or both eyes. Many people with this condition are born with eyeballs that are abnormally small (microphthalmia). Other eye problems can include clouding of the lens (cataract) and a higher risk of glaucoma, an eye disease that increases the pressure in the eye. These abnormalities can lead to vision loss or blindness.\n\nPeople with OFCD syndrome often have a long, narrow face with distinctive facial features, including deep-set eyes and a broad nasal tip that is divided by a cleft. Some affected people have an opening in the roof of the mouth called a cleft palate.\n\nHeart defects are another common feature of OFCD syndrome. Babies with this condition may be born with a hole between two chambers of the heart (an atrial or ventricular septal defect) or a leak in one of the valves that controls blood flow through the heart (mitral valve prolapse).\n\nTeeth with very large roots (radiculomegaly) are characteristic of OFCD syndrome. Additional dental abnormalities can include delayed loss of primary (baby) teeth, missing or abnormally small teeth, misaligned teeth, and defective tooth enamel.
PHACE syndrome
MedGen UID:
376231
Concept ID:
C1847874
Disease or Syndrome
PHACE is an acronym for a neurocutaneous syndrome encompassing the following features: posterior fossa brain malformations, hemangiomas of the face (large or complex), arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, and eye abnormalities. The association is referred to as PHACES when ventral developmental defects, such as sternal clefting or supraumbilical raphe, are present (summary by Bracken et al., 2011).
Spastic ataxia-corneal dystrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
336493
Concept ID:
C1849085
Disease or Syndrome
Extremely rare syndrome with features of spastic ataxia in association with bilateral congenital cataract, corneal dystrophy, and nonaxial myopia. It has been described in an inbred Bedouin family. Immunological abnormalities were frequent. Transmission is autosomal recessive and the disease is monogenic.
Congenital osteogenesis imperfecta-microcephaly-cataracts syndrome
MedGen UID:
337988
Concept ID:
C1850184
Disease or Syndrome
A rare multiple congenital malformations/dysmorphic syndrome characterized by osteogenesis imperfecta with multiple prenatal bone fractures, joint laxity, severe microcephaly, and bilateral cataracts. Additional reported manifestations include dysmorphic facial features (such as blue sclerae, hypertelorism, and low-set ears), lissencephaly, hydrocephalus, and cardiac and genital anomalies. The syndrome is lethal <i>in utero</i> or shortly after birth. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1978.
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
342799
Concept ID:
C1853102
Disease or Syndrome
Any COFS syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ERCC2 gene.
Absence deformity of leg-cataract syndrome
MedGen UID:
343374
Concept ID:
C1855523
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare congenital limb malformation syndrome characterized by absence deformity of one leg, progressive scoliosis, short stature, and congenital cataract associated with dysplasia of the optic nerve. No intellectual deficit has been reported. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1968.
Vici syndrome
MedGen UID:
340962
Concept ID:
C1855772
Disease or Syndrome
With the current widespread use of multigene panels and comprehensive genomic testing, it has become apparent that the phenotypic spectrum of EPG5-related disorder represents a continuum. At the most severe end of the spectrum is classic Vici syndrome (defined as a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystem involvement characterized by the combination of agenesis of the corpus callosum, cataracts, hypopigmentation, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and failure to thrive); at the milder end of the spectrum are attenuated neurodevelopmental phenotypes with variable multisystem involvement. Median survival in classic Vici syndrome appears to be 24 months, with only 10% of children surviving longer than age five years; the most common causes of death are respiratory infections as a result of primary immunodeficiency and/or cardiac insufficiency resulting from progressive cardiac failure. No data are available on life span in individuals at the milder end of the spectrum.
Cataract 22 multiple types
MedGen UID:
341862
Concept ID:
C1857853
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYBB3 gene have been identified in families with cataract, described as congenital nuclear cataract with cortical riders, nuclear, posterior polar, anterior polar, and cortical. The preferred title/symbol of this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Congenital Nuclear, Autosomal Recessive 2; CATCN2.'
Cataract 9 multiple types
MedGen UID:
347693
Concept ID:
C1858679
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYAA gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as nuclear, zonular central nuclear, laminar, lamellar, anterior polar, posterior polar, cortical, embryonal, anterior subcapsular, fan-shaped, and total. Cataract associated with microcornea, sometimes called the cataract-microcornea syndrome, is also caused by mutation in the CRYAA gene. Both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes of inheritance have been reported. The symbol CATC1 was formerly used for the autosomal recessive form of cataract caused by mutation in the CRYAA gene.
Congenital cataracts-facial dysmorphism-neuropathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
346973
Concept ID:
C1858726
Congenital Abnormality
CTDP1-related congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, and neuropathy (CTDP1-CCFDN) is characterized by abnormalities of the eye (bilateral congenital cataracts, microcornea, microphthalmia, micropupils), mildly dysmorphic facial features apparent in late childhood, and a hypo-/demyelinating, symmetric, distal peripheral neuropathy. The neuropathy is predominantly motor at the onset and results in delays in early motor development, progressing to severe disability by the third decade of life. Secondary foot deformities and scoliosis are common. Sensory neuropathy develops after age ten years. Most affected individuals have a mild nonprogressive intellectual deficit and cerebellar involvement including ataxia, nystagmus, intention tremor, and dysmetria. All have short stature and most have subnormal weight. Adults have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Parainfectious rhabdomyolysis (profound muscle weakness, myoglobinuria, and excessively elevated serum concentration of creatine kinase usually following a viral infection) is a potentially life-threatening complication. To date all affected individuals and carriers identified have been from the Romani population.
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 1
MedGen UID:
347072
Concept ID:
C1859133
Disease or Syndrome
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 1 (RCDP1), a peroxisome biogenesis disorder (PBD) has a classic (severe) form and a nonclassic (mild) form. Classic (severe) RCDP1 is characterized by proximal shortening of the humerus (rhizomelia) and to a lesser degree the femur, punctate calcifications in cartilage with epiphyseal and metaphyseal abnormalities (chondrodysplasia punctata, or CDP), coronal clefts of the vertebral bodies, and cataracts that are usually present at birth or appear in the first few months of life. Birth weight, length, and head circumference are often at the lower range of normal; postnatal growth deficiency is profound. Intellectual disability is severe, and the majority of children develop seizures. Most affected children do not survive the first decade of life; a proportion die in the neonatal period. Nonclassic (mild) RCDP1 is characterized by congenital or childhood cataracts, CDP or infrequently, chondrodysplasia manifesting only as mild epiphyseal changes, variable rhizomelia, and milder intellectual disability and growth restriction than classic RCDP1.
Autosomal recessive palmoplantar keratoderma and congenital alopecia
MedGen UID:
347851
Concept ID:
C1859316
Disease or Syndrome
Palmoplantar keratoderma and congenital alopecia-2 (PPKCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital alopecia and progressive hyperkeratosis resulting in sclerodactyly, severe contractures and tapering of the digits, and pseudoainhum formation. Nail changes occur in some patients (Castori et al., 2010). Also see PPKCA1 (104100), a less severe, autosomal dominant disorder.
Sengers syndrome
MedGen UID:
395228
Concept ID:
C1859317
Disease or Syndrome
Sengers syndrome is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, exercise intolerance, and lactic acidosis. Mental development is normal, but affected individuals may die early from cardiomyopathy (summary by Mayr et al., 2012). Skeletal muscle biopsies of 2 affected individuals showed severe mtDNA depletion (Calvo et al., 2012).
Cataract 6 multiple types
MedGen UID:
396229
Concept ID:
C1861825
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the EPHA2 gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as posterior polar, congenital total, complete, and age-related cortical. The preferred title/symbol of this entry was formerly 'Cataract, posterior polar, 1; CTPP1,' and 'Cataract, Age-Related Cortical, 2; ARCC2' was formerly a distinct entry.
Cataract 8 multiple types
MedGen UID:
396230
Concept ID:
C1861833
Disease or Syndrome
The Volkmann type of cataract has been variously described as progressive, central, or zonular, with opacities in the embryonic, fetal, and juvenile nucleus and around the anterior and posterior Y-suture. Expression is highly variable, ranging from hardly recognizable opacities in the lens to dense cataracts. Affected members may thus be unaware of having the disease (Eiberg et al., 1995). The preferred title/symbol of this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Congenital, Volkmann Type; CCV.'
Cataract 11 multiple types
MedGen UID:
351162
Concept ID:
C1864567
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the PITX3 gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as congenital total and posterior polar. The preferred title/symbol for this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Posterior Polar, 4; CTPP4.'
Hypomyelination and Congenital Cataract
MedGen UID:
501134
Concept ID:
C1864663
Congenital Abnormality
Hypomyelination and congenital cataract (HCC) is usually characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts and normal psychomotor or only mildly delayed development in the first year of life, followed by slowly progressive neurologic impairment manifest as ataxia, spasticity (brisk tendon reflexes and bilateral extensor plantar responses), and mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment. Dysarthria and truncal hypotonia are observed. Cerebellar signs (truncal titubation and intention tremor) and peripheral neuropathy (muscle weakness and wasting of the legs) are present in the majority of affected individuals. Seizures can occur. Cataracts may be absent in some individuals.
PHGDH deficiency
MedGen UID:
400935
Concept ID:
C1866174
Disease or Syndrome
Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency (PHGDHD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of L-serine biosynthesis that is characterized by congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, and seizures (summary by Jaeken et al., 1996).
Scalp-ear-nipple syndrome
MedGen UID:
357183
Concept ID:
C1867020
Disease or Syndrome
Scalp-ear-nipple syndrome is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita of the scalp, breast anomalies that range from hypothelia or athelia to amastia, and minor anomalies of the external ears. Less frequent clinical characteristics include nail dystrophy, dental anomalies, cutaneous syndactyly of the digits, and renal malformations. Penetrance appears to be high, although there is substantial variable expressivity within families (Marneros et al., 2013).
Oculoauricular syndrome
MedGen UID:
393758
Concept ID:
C2677500
Disease or Syndrome
Oculoauricular syndrome (OCACS) is characterized by complex ocular anomalies, including congenital cataract, anterior segment dysgenesis, iris coloboma, and early-onset retinal dystrophy, and dysplastic ears with abnormal external ear cartilage (summary by Gillespie et al., 2015).
Congenital cataract-progressive muscular hypotonia-hearing loss-developmental delay syndrome
MedGen UID:
416525
Concept ID:
C2751320
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital cataract-progressive muscular hypotonia-hearing loss-developmental delay syndrome is a rare, genetic, mitochondrial myopathy disorder characterized by congenital cataract, progressive muscular hypotonia that particularly affects the lower limbs, reduced deep tendon reflexes, sensorineural hearing loss, global development delay and lactic acidosis. Muscle biopsy reveals reduced complex I, II and IV respiratory chain activity.
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A6
MedGen UID:
461764
Concept ID:
C3150414
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Adams-Oliver syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
481812
Concept ID:
C3280182
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) of the scalp and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). ACC lesions usually occur in the midline of the parietal or occipital regions, but can also occur on the abdomen or limbs. At birth, an ACC lesion may already have the appearance of a healed scar. ACC lesions less than 5 cm often involve only the skin and almost always heal over a period of months; larger lesions are more likely to involve the skull and possibly the dura, and are at greater risk for complications, which can include infection, hemorrhage, or thrombosis, and can result in death. The limb defects range from mild (unilateral or bilateral short distal phalanges) to severe (complete absence of all toes or fingers, feet or hands, or more, often resembling an amputation). The lower extremities are almost always more severely affected than the upper extremities. Additional major features frequently include cardiovascular malformations/dysfunction (23%), brain anomalies, and less frequently renal, liver, and eye anomalies.
Warburg micro syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
481833
Concept ID:
C3280203
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Warburg micro syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
481844
Concept ID:
C3280214
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Cataract 37
MedGen UID:
482388
Concept ID:
C3280758
Disease or Syndrome
A cataract that has material basis in variation in the region 12q24.2-q24.3.
Huppke-Brendel syndrome
MedGen UID:
482595
Concept ID:
C3280965
Disease or Syndrome
Huppke-Brendel syndrome (HBS) is characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, sensorineural hearing loss, and severe developmental delay. To date, six individuals with HBS have been reported in the literature. All presented in infancy with axial hypotonia; motor delay was apparent in the first few months of life with lack of head control and paucity of limb movement. Seizures have been reported infrequently. In all individuals described to date serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels were very low or undetectable. Brain MRI examination showed hypomyelination, cerebellar hypoplasia mainly affecting the vermis, and wide subarachnoid spaces. None of the individuals reported to date were able to sit or walk independently. All affected individuals died between age ten months and six years.
Cataract 4 multiple types
MedGen UID:
761925
Concept ID:
C3540850
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYGD gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as aculeiform, crystalline aculeiform, crystalline, crystal, frosted, needle-shaped, fasciculiform, congenital cerulean, nonnuclear polymorphic congenital, central nuclear, lamellar, and punctate. Some patients also exhibit microcornea. Because multiple types of cataract are caused by mutation in the CRYGD gene, some of which display intrafamilial variability, several earlier distinct cataract entries in OMIM have been included here.
Cataract 38
MedGen UID:
766408
Concept ID:
C3553494
Disease or Syndrome
Any early-onset non-syndromic cataract in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the AGK gene.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 14B
MedGen UID:
766969
Concept ID:
C3554055
Disease or Syndrome
PBD14B is an autosomal recessive peroxisome biogenesis disorder characterized clinically by mild intellectual disability, congenital cataracts, progressive hearing loss, and polyneuropathy (Ebberink et al., 2012), all of which had been observed in patients with mild peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (e.g., Kelley et al., 1986; Poll-The et al., 1987). Additionally, recurrent migraine-like episodes following mental stress or physical exertion, not a common feature in peroxisome disorders, was reported. Thoms and Gartner (2012) classified the disorder described by Ebberink et al. (2012) in their patient as a mild 'Zellweger syndrome (214100) spectrum' (ZSS) disorder. See PBD1B (601539) for a phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of less severe phenotypes on the Zellweger syndrome spectrum. See PBD9B (614879) for another atypical peroxisome biogenesis disorder.
Cataract 13 with adult I phenotype
MedGen UID:
811703
Concept ID:
C3805373
Disease or Syndrome
The i and I antigens of the I blood group system (110800) are carbohydrate structures carried on glycolipids and glycoproteins and are characterized as straight or branched glycochains composed of repeating N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc) units, respectively. Conversion of i antigen into an I-active structure requires the activity of the I-branching enzyme, beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GCNT2; 600429), which adds the decisive GlcNAc-beta-1-6 branch onto the straight poly-LacNAc chains. Expression of the i and I antigens on red blood cells (RBCs) is reciprocal and developmentally regulated. Adult human RBCs predominantly express I antigen, whereas fetal and neonatal RBCs predominantly express i antigen. After birth, I antigen levels increase gradually as i antigen levels fall, with the normal Ii status of adult RBCs reached after about 13 to 20 months. Mutations that specifically affect 1 of the 3 variants produced by the GCNT2 gene cause the rare adult i phenotype (see 110800), in which adult RBCs are rich in i antigen and contain low levels of I antigen. Mutations that eliminate all 3 GCNT2 variants cause the adult i phenotype with congenital cataract (review by Yu and Lin, 2011).
Partial lipodystrophy, congenital cataracts, and neurodegeneration syndrome
MedGen UID:
813897
Concept ID:
C3807567
Disease or Syndrome
Lipodystrophies are rare disorders characterized by loss of body fat from various regions and predisposition to metabolic complications of insulin resistance and lipid abnormalities. FPLD7 is an autosomal dominant disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Additional features, including early-onset cataracts and later onset of spasticity of the lower limbs, have been noted in some patients (summary by Garg et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660.
Cataract 12 multiple types
MedGen UID:
814445
Concept ID:
C3808115
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the BFSP2 gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as juvenile-onset lamellar, cortical, nuclear embryonic; and congenital nuclear, sutural, stellate, Y-sutural, and punctate cortical.
Cataract 16 multiple types
MedGen UID:
814707
Concept ID:
C3808377
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYAB gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as congenital posterior polar, congenital lamellar, and juvenile. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive forms have been described. The preferred title/symbol of this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Posterior Polar, 2; CTPP2.'
Cataract 39 multiple types
MedGen UID:
815130
Concept ID:
C3808800
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYGB gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as lamellar, anterior polar, and complete.
Warburg micro syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
816595
Concept ID:
C3810265
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 64
MedGen UID:
816619
Concept ID:
C3810289
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-64 (SPG64) is a neurologic disorder characterized by childhood onset of progressive spastic paraplegia with impaired intellectual development, gait impairment, dysarthria, and white matter abnormalities on brain imaging. Some individuals show neurocognitive regression (Calame et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive SPG, see SPG5A (270800).
Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy
MedGen UID:
854768
Concept ID:
C3888099
Disease or Syndrome
Bestrophinopathies, the spectrum of ophthalmic disorders caused by pathogenic variants in BEST1, are typically characterized by retinal degeneration. The four recognized phenotypes are the three autosomal dominant disorders: Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD), BEST1 adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD), and autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC); and autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy (ARB). Onset is usually in the first decade (except AVMD in which onset is age 30 to 50 years). Slow visual deterioration is the usual course. Choroidal neovascularization can occur in rare cases. ADVIRC is also associated with panophthalmic involvement including nanophthalmos, microcornea, hyperopia, and narrow anterior chamber angle with angle closure glaucoma.
Cataract 17 multiple types
MedGen UID:
854781
Concept ID:
C3888124
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYBB1 gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as congenital nuclear, congenital nuclear with anterior and posterior Y-suture and polar opacities, and pulverulent. The preferred title/symbol for this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Congenital Nuclear, Autosomal Recessive 3; CATCN3.'
Cataract 42
MedGen UID:
859891
Concept ID:
C4011454
Disease or Syndrome
Any early-onset non-syndromic cataract in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CRYBA2 gene.
Trichothiodystrophy 3, photosensitive
MedGen UID:
865608
Concept ID:
C4017171
Disease or Syndrome
Trichothiodystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which patients have brittle, sulfur-deficient hair that displays a diagnostic alternating light and dark banding pattern, called 'tiger tail banding,' under polarizing microscopy. TTD patients display a wide variety of clinical features, including cutaneous, neurologic, and growth abnormalities. Common additional clinical features are ichthyosis, intellectual/developmental disabilities, decreased fertility, abnormal characteristics at birth, ocular abnormalities, short stature, and infections. There are both photosensitive and nonphotosensitive forms of the disorder. Patients with TTD have not been reported to have a predisposition to cancer (summary by Faghri et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of TTD, see 601675.
Cataract 45
MedGen UID:
895198
Concept ID:
C4225182
Disease or Syndrome
Any early-onset non-syndromic cataract in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the SIPA1L3 gene.
Hyperphosphatasia with intellectual disability syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
906509
Concept ID:
C4225201
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperphosphatasia with impaired intellectual development syndrome-6 (HPMRS6) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by global developmental delay, dysmorphic features, seizures, and congenital cataracts. Severity is variable, and the disorder may show a range of phenotypic and biochemical abnormalities, including increased serum alkaline phosphatase levels (summary by Ilkovski et al., 2015). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HPMRS, see HPMRS1 (239300). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Familial progressive retinal dystrophy-iris coloboma-congenital cataract syndrome
MedGen UID:
904740
Concept ID:
C4225233
Disease or Syndrome
Retinal dystrophy and iris coloboma with or without cataract (RDICC) is characterized by early-onset chorioretinal dystrophy that is variably associated with other eye anomalies, including iris coloboma and/or congenital or early-onset cataract. Congenital glaucoma has also been observed (Conte et al., 2015; Jedlickova et al., 2023).
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 5
MedGen UID:
900333
Concept ID:
C4225237
Disease or Syndrome
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP) is a peroxisomal disorder characterized by disproportionately short stature primarily affecting the proximal parts of the extremities, a typical facial appearance including a broad nasal bridge, epicanthus, high-arched palate, dysplastic external ears, and micrognathia, congenital contractures, characteristic ocular involvement, dwarfism, and severe mental retardation with spasticity. Biochemically, plasmalogen synthesis and phytanic acid alpha-oxidation are defective. Most patients die in the first decade of life (summary by Wanders and Waterham, 2005). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, see 215100.
Cutis laxa, autosomal dominant 3
MedGen UID:
899774
Concept ID:
C4225268
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant cutis laxa-3 is characterized by thin skin with visible veins and wrinkles, cataract or corneal clouding, clenched fingers, pre- and postnatal growth retardation, and moderate intellectual disability. In addition, patients exhibit a combination of muscular hypotonia with brisk muscle reflexes (Fischer-Zirnsak et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant cutis laxa, see ARCL1 (123700).
Cataract 44
MedGen UID:
907487
Concept ID:
C4225300
Disease or Syndrome
Any early-onset non-syndromic cataract in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the LSS gene.
Harel-Yoon syndrome
MedGen UID:
934644
Concept ID:
C4310677
Disease or Syndrome
Harel-Yoon syndrome is a syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, truncal hypotonia, spasticity, and peripheral neuropathy. Other more variable features such as optic atrophy may also occur. Laboratory studies in some patients show evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Harel et al., 2016).
Autosomal dominant Kenny-Caffey syndrome
MedGen UID:
1373312
Concept ID:
C4316787
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, primary bone dysplasia characterized by severe growth retardation, short stature, cortical thickening and medullary stenosis of long bones, delayed closure of the anterior fontanelle, absent diploic space in the skull bones, prominent forehead, macrocephaly, dental anomalies, eye problems (hypermetropia and pseudopapilledema), and hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism, sometimes resulting in convulsions. Intelligence is normal.
Knobloch syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1642123
Concept ID:
C4551775
Disease or Syndrome
Knobloch syndrome-1 (KNO1) is an autosomal recessive developmental disorder primarily characterized by typical eye abnormalities, including high myopia, cataracts, dislocated lens, vitreoretinal degeneration, and retinal detachment, with occipital skull defects, which can range from occipital encephalocele to occult cutis aplasia (summary by Aldahmesh et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Knobloch Syndrome KNO2 (618458) is caused by mutation in the PAK2 gene (605022) on chromosome 3q29.
Brain small vessel disease 1 with or without ocular anomalies
MedGen UID:
1647320
Concept ID:
C4551998
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of COL4A1-related disorders includes: small-vessel brain disease of varying severity including porencephaly, variably associated with eye defects (retinal arterial tortuosity, Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly, cataract) and systemic findings (kidney involvement, muscle cramps, cerebral aneurysms, Raynaud phenomenon, cardiac arrhythmia, and hemolytic anemia). On imaging studies, small-vessel brain disease is manifest as diffuse periventricular leukoencephalopathy, lacunar infarcts, microhemorrhage, dilated perivascular spaces, and deep intracerebral hemorrhages. Clinically, small-vessel brain disease manifests as infantile hemiparesis, seizures, single or recurrent hemorrhagic stroke, ischemic stroke, and isolated migraine with aura. Porencephaly (fluid-filled cavities in the brain detected by CT or MRI) is typically manifest as infantile hemiparesis, seizures, and intellectual disability; however, on occasion it can be an incidental finding. HANAC (hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps) syndrome usually associates asymptomatic small-vessel brain disease, cerebral large vessel involvement (i.e., aneurysms), and systemic findings involving the kidney, muscle, and small vessels of the eye. Two additional phenotypes include isolated retinal artery tortuosity and nonsyndromic autosomal dominant congenital cataract.
Cataract 2, multiple types
MedGen UID:
1648415
Concept ID:
C4721890
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYGC gene have been found to cause several types of cataract, which have been described as Coppock-like; embryonic, fetal, infantile nuclear; zonular pulverulent; and lamellar. Some patients also exhibit microcornea. Before it was known that mutations in the CRYGC gene cause several types of cataract, this entry was titled 'Cataract, Coppock-like,' with the symbol CCL.
X-linked Alport syndrome
MedGen UID:
1648433
Concept ID:
C4746986
Disease or Syndrome
In Alport syndrome (AS) a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from progressive renal disease with extrarenal abnormalities to isolated hematuria with a non-progressive or very slowly progressive course is observed. Approximately two thirds of AS is X-linked (XLAS); approximately 15% is autosomal recessive (ARAS), and approximately 20% is autosomal dominant (ADAS). In the absence of treatment, renal disease progresses from microscopic hematuria (microhematuria) to proteinuria, progressive renal insufficiency, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in all males with XLAS, and in all males and females with ARAS. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is usually present by late childhood or early adolescence. Ocular findings include anterior lenticonus (which is virtually pathognomonic), maculopathy (whitish or yellowish flecks or granulations in the perimacular region), corneal endothelial vesicles (posterior polymorphous dystrophy), and recurrent corneal erosion. In individuals with ADAS, ESRD is frequently delayed until later adulthood, SNHL is relatively late in onset, and ocular involvement is rare.
Microcephaly, cataracts, impaired intellectual development, and dystonia with abnormal striatum
MedGen UID:
1648355
Concept ID:
C4748984
Disease or Syndrome
The MCIDDS syndrome is characterized by microcephaly and growth retardation, congenital cataracts, impaired intellectual development with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, and dystonia, with striatal thinning seen on MRI (Al-Owain et al., 2013).
Oculocerebrodental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1674537
Concept ID:
C5193101
Disease or Syndrome
Oculoskeletodental syndrome (OCSKD) is characterized by congenital cataract, short stature and various skeletal anomalies, dysmorphic facial features and dental anomalies, developmental delay, and stroke. Other recurrent features include hearing loss, secondary glaucoma, and nephrocalcinosis (Tiosano et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with spastic quadriplegia, optic atrophy, seizures, and structural brain anomalies
MedGen UID:
1684884
Concept ID:
C5231442
Disease or Syndrome
Halperin-Birk syndrome (HLBKS) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by structural brain defects, spastic quadriplegia with multiple contractures, profound developmental delay, seizures, dysmorphism, cataract, and optic nerve atrophy. Death occurs in early childhood (Halperin et al., 2019).
Catifa syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684686
Concept ID:
C5231492
Disease or Syndrome
CATIFA syndrome is characterized by global developmental delay and impaired intellectual development ranging from mild to severe, with most patients exhibiting attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Patients show an elongated face with long philtrum and small ears. Ocular anomalies include congenital cataracts, strabismus, and amblyopia, which may be associated with reduced vision; other anomalies include cleft lip and/or palate and misaligned teeth with extensive caries (Unlu et al., 2020).
Sandestig-stefanova syndrome
MedGen UID:
1718072
Concept ID:
C5394118
Disease or Syndrome
Sandestig-Stefanova syndrome (SANDSTEF) is an autosomal recessive developmental syndrome characterized by pre- and postnatal microcephaly, trigonocephaly, congenital cataract, microphthalmia, facial gestalt, camptodactyly, loss of periventricular white matter, thin corpus callosum, delayed myelinization, and poor prognosis (Sandestig et al., 2019).
Intellectual developmental disorder with poor growth and with or without seizures or ataxia
MedGen UID:
1711370
Concept ID:
C5394135
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with poor growth and with or without seizures or ataxia (IDPOGSA) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy, hypotonia, and poor overall growth, sometimes with borderline microcephaly. The phenotype is highly variable: some patients may show ataxia and some may have seizures (summary by Hu et al., 2019).
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia, hypotonia, and respiratory insufficiency syndrome, neonatal lethal
MedGen UID:
1716458
Concept ID:
C5394137
Disease or Syndrome
Neonatal lethal pontocerebellar hypoplasia, hypotonia, and respiratory insufficiency syndrome (PHRINL) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder with onset in utero and death in the neonatal period. Rare patients may survive a few months. Affected infants show respiratory insufficiency and almost no spontaneous movement at birth, usually requiring mechanical ventilation and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. Additional features include corneal clouding, seizures, dysmorphic facies, contractures, and progressive pontocerebellar hypoplasia with simplified gyral pattern and white matter abnormalities. Some patients may have cardiac anomalies or cardiac hypertrophy. Laboratory studies show evidence consistent with mitochondrial defects and/or abnormal cholesterol or lipid metabolism. Depending on the type of mutation or deletion, some patients may have a less severe disorder (see GENOTYPE/PHENOTYPE CORRELATIONS) (summary by Desai et al., 2017).
Chromosome 1p36.33 duplication syndrome, atad3 gene cluster, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1708515
Concept ID:
C5394150
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant chromosome 1p36.33 duplication syndrome is a severe multisystemic disorder characterized by neonatal respiratory insufficiency, hypotonia, and cardiomyopathy, resulting in death in the first weeks of life. Affected infants may also have seizures, contractures, and corneal opacities. Brain imaging shows variable anomalies, such as white matter changes, and laboratory studies suggest that the phenotype results from metabolic defects in mitochondrial and cholesterol homeostasis (summary by Gunning et al., 2020).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with intellectual disability), type B1
MedGen UID:
1774807
Concept ID:
C5436962
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophies resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239) are characterized by early onset of muscle weakness, usually before ambulation is achieved; intellectual disability mild brain anomalies are variable (Balci et al., 2005; Godfrey et al., 2007). Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathies with or without impaired intellectual development (type B) represent the intermediate range of the spectrum of dystroglycanopathies. They are less severe than muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A; see MDDGA1, 236670), previously designated Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) or muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), and more severe than limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (type C; see MDDGC1, 609308). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy-Dystroglycanopathy with or without Impaired Intellectual Development (Type B) Congenital muscular dystrophy with impaired intellectual development due to defective glycosylation of DAG1 is genetically heterogeneous. See also MDDGB2 (613156), caused by mutation in the POMT2 gene (607439); MDDGB3 (613151), caused by mutation in the POMGNT1 gene (606822); MDDGB4 (613152), caused by mutation in the FKTN gene (607440); MDDGB5 (616612), caused by mutation in the FKRP gene (606596); MDDGB6 (608840), caused by mutation in the LARGE gene (603590); MDDGB14 (615351), caused by mutation in the GMPPB gene (615320); and MDDGB15 (618992), caused by mutation in the DPM3 gene (605951).
Martsolf syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1778114
Concept ID:
C5542298
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Cerebellar hypoplasia-intellectual disability-congenital microcephaly-dystonia-anemia-growth retardation syndrome
MedGen UID:
1780242
Concept ID:
C5543287
Disease or Syndrome
CIMDAG syndrome (CIMDAG) is a multisystemic disorder characterized by severely impaired psychomotor development and hematologic abnormalities apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals show poor overall growth with microcephaly, impaired intellectual development, poor or absent speech, poor eye contact, and motor problems, such as inability to walk, hypotonia, and spasticity. Brain imaging typically shows cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, and delayed myelination. The associated hematologic abnormalities are variable, but are mostly consistent with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) (summary by Rodger et al., 2020 and Seu et al., 2020).
Deafness, cataract, impaired intellectual development, and polyneuropathy
MedGen UID:
1781637
Concept ID:
C5543482
Disease or Syndrome
Deafness, cataract, impaired intellectual development, and polyneuropathy (DCIDP) is characterized by early-onset of deafness, cataract, severe developmental delay, and severely impaired intellectual development. Patients later develop polyneuropathy of the lower extremities, associated with depigmentation of the hair in that area (Kroll-Hermi et al., 2020).
Martsolf syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1779703
Concept ID:
C5543626
Disease or Syndrome
Martsolf syndrome-2 (MARTS2) is an autosomal recessive disorder with the main features of congenital cataracts, mildly to severely impaired intellectual development, and facial dysmorphism. Other features include brain malformations, microcephaly, and hypogonadism-hypogenitalism (summary by Koparir et al., 2019).
Microcephaly-congenital cataract-psoriasiform dermatitis syndrome
MedGen UID:
1798933
Concept ID:
C5567510
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, congenital cataract, and psoriasiform dermatitis (MCCPD) represents an inborn error of cholesterol metabolism that is characterized by accumulation of a large amount of methylsterols, particularly dimethylsterols, in affected patients. The associated features of immune dysregulation, skin disease, and growth delay can be at least partially corrected with cholesterol and statin supplements (He et al., 2014).
Transketolase deficiency
MedGen UID:
1814561
Concept ID:
C5700245
Disease or Syndrome
A rare disorder of pentose phosphate metabolism with characteristics of developmental delay and intellectual disability, delayed or absent speech, short stature and congenital heart defects (such as ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale). Additional reported features include hypotonia, hyperactivity, stereotypic behaviour, ophthalmologic abnormalities (bilateral cataract, uveitis, strabismus), hearing impairment and variable facial dysmorphism among others. Laboratory analysis shows elevated plasma and urinary polyols (erythritol, arabitol and ribitol) and urinary sugar-phosphates (ribose-5-phosphate and xylulose/ribulose-5-phosphate).
Developmental delay, language impairment, and ocular abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1824035
Concept ID:
C5774262
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, language impairment, and ocular abnormalities (DEVLO) is characterized by delayed acquisition of skills particularly affecting speech and language development, although many patients show mild motor delay. Most affected individuals also have a small head circumference (down to -3 SD) and may have mild dysmorphic features. Variable ocular anomalies include strabismus, cataracts, and cortical visual impairment. Older patients require special schooling and often demonstrate behavioral abnormalities (Laboy Cintron et al., 2022).
Atelis syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1824055
Concept ID:
C5774282
Disease or Syndrome
Atelis syndrome-2 (ATELS2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by poor overall growth with microcephaly and short stature, dysmorphic facial features, and congenital cardiac defects. Additional more variable features may include hematologic abnormalities, variable ocular abnormalities, motor delay, and anxiety. Patient cells exhibit a unique chromosomal instability phenotype consisting of segmented and dicentric chromosomes with mosaic variegated hyperploidy (Grange et al., 2022). See also ATELS1 (620184), caused by mutation in the SLF2 gene (610348). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MVA, see MVA1 (257300).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Khan AO, Aldahmesh MA, Mohamed JY, Alkuraya FS
Ophthalmic Genet 2012 Jun;33(2):89-95. Epub 2012 Jan 9 doi: 10.3109/13816810.2011.634881. PMID: 22229851
Gupta A, Kekunnaya R, Ramappa M, Vaddavalli PK
Br J Ophthalmol 2011 Apr;95(4):477-80. Epub 2010 Oct 8 doi: 10.1136/bjo.2010.184606. PMID: 20935310

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Lohia K, Soans RS, Agarwal D, Tandon R, Saxena R, Gandhi TK
Surv Ophthalmol 2023 Jan-Feb;68(1):126-141. Epub 2022 Aug 19 doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2022.08.009. PMID: 35988744
Kabylbekova A, Meirmanov S, Aringazina A, Orazbekov L, Auyezova A
Indian J Ophthalmol 2022 Dec;70(12):4325-4330. doi: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_939_22. PMID: 36453339Free PMC Article
Kabylbekova A, Meirmanov S, Aringazina A, Orazbekov L, Auyezova A
Ann Med 2022 Dec;54(1):1988-1993. doi: 10.1080/07853890.2022.2091156. PMID: 35833752Free PMC Article
Lin X, Li H, Zhou X, Liu X, Fan F, Yang T, Luo Y
BMC Ophthalmol 2022 May 13;22(1):218. doi: 10.1186/s12886-022-02446-3. PMID: 35562718Free PMC Article
Prado RB, Silva VF, Schellini SA, Rodrigues AC
Arq Bras Oftalmol 2016 Feb;79(1):19-23. doi: 10.5935/0004-2749.20160007. PMID: 26840161

Diagnosis

Dandekar P, Chaurasia S
BMJ Case Rep 2023 Feb 17;16(2) doi: 10.1136/bcr-2021-248550. PMID: 36805864Free PMC Article
Khokhar S, Gupta Y, Rani D, Rathod A, Moharana S
Indian J Ophthalmol 2022 Jul;70(7):2421-2425. doi: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_293_22. PMID: 35791123Free PMC Article
Lin X, Li H, Zhou X, Liu X, Fan F, Yang T, Luo Y
BMC Ophthalmol 2022 May 13;22(1):218. doi: 10.1186/s12886-022-02446-3. PMID: 35562718Free PMC Article
Xiao W, Song Z, Wang M
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus 2021 May-Jun;58(3):180-187. Epub 2021 May 1 doi: 10.3928/01913913-20210108-03. PMID: 34039155
Zhu X, Du Y, He W, Sun T, Zhang Y, Chang R, Zhang K, Lu Y
Sci Rep 2017 Jun 26;7(1):4254. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-04332-1. PMID: 28652574Free PMC Article

Therapy

Yucel OE, Gul A
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus 2023 Nov-Dec;60(6):441-447. Epub 2023 Feb 21 doi: 10.3928/01913913-20230119-01. PMID: 36803243
Lohia K, Soans RS, Agarwal D, Tandon R, Saxena R, Gandhi TK
Surv Ophthalmol 2023 Jan-Feb;68(1):126-141. Epub 2022 Aug 19 doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2022.08.009. PMID: 35988744
Khokhar S, Gupta Y, Rani D, Rathod A, Moharana S
Indian J Ophthalmol 2022 Jul;70(7):2421-2425. doi: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_293_22. PMID: 35791123Free PMC Article
Ram J, Singh R, Gupta R, Bhutani G, Gupta PC, Sukhija J
Acta Ophthalmol 2017 Mar;95(2):e95-e100. Epub 2016 Aug 30 doi: 10.1111/aos.13220. PMID: 27573881
Magli A, Carelli R, Forte R, Chiariello Vecchio E, Esposito F, Torre A
Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(3):358-362. Epub 2016 Apr 14 doi: 10.3109/08820538.2015.1095305. PMID: 27077682

Prognosis

Lohia K, Soans RS, Agarwal D, Tandon R, Saxena R, Gandhi TK
Surv Ophthalmol 2023 Jan-Feb;68(1):126-141. Epub 2022 Aug 19 doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2022.08.009. PMID: 35988744
Kabylbekova A, Meirmanov S, Aringazina A, Orazbekov L, Auyezova A
Ann Med 2022 Dec;54(1):1988-1993. doi: 10.1080/07853890.2022.2091156. PMID: 35833752Free PMC Article
Lin X, Li H, Zhou X, Liu X, Fan F, Yang T, Luo Y
BMC Ophthalmol 2022 May 13;22(1):218. doi: 10.1186/s12886-022-02446-3. PMID: 35562718Free PMC Article
Xiao W, Song Z, Wang M
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus 2021 May-Jun;58(3):180-187. Epub 2021 May 1 doi: 10.3928/01913913-20210108-03. PMID: 34039155
Ram J, Singh R, Gupta R, Bhutani G, Gupta PC, Sukhija J
Acta Ophthalmol 2017 Mar;95(2):e95-e100. Epub 2016 Aug 30 doi: 10.1111/aos.13220. PMID: 27573881

Clinical prediction guides

Dericioğlu V, Sevik MO, Bağatur Vurgun E, Çerman E
Turk J Ophthalmol 2023 Oct 19;53(5):267-274. doi: 10.4274/tjo.galenos.2023.50951. PMID: 37867431Free PMC Article
Lin X, Li H, Zhou X, Liu X, Fan F, Yang T, Luo Y
BMC Ophthalmol 2022 May 13;22(1):218. doi: 10.1186/s12886-022-02446-3. PMID: 35562718Free PMC Article
Gu S, Hu Y, Zhao Y, Chen L, Sun W, Chang P, Wang D, Zhao Y
Front Public Health 2022;10:788384. Epub 2022 Mar 17 doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2022.788384. PMID: 35372237Free PMC Article
Pitchaimuthu K, Sourav S, Bottari D, Banerjee S, Shareef I, Kekunnaya R, Röder B
Restor Neurol Neurosci 2019;37(6):583-590. doi: 10.3233/RNN-190928. PMID: 31839614
Magli A, Carelli R, Forte R, Chiariello Vecchio E, Esposito F, Torre A
Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(3):358-362. Epub 2016 Apr 14 doi: 10.3109/08820538.2015.1095305. PMID: 27077682

Recent systematic reviews

Lohia K, Soans RS, Agarwal D, Tandon R, Saxena R, Gandhi TK
Surv Ophthalmol 2023 Jan-Feb;68(1):126-141. Epub 2022 Aug 19 doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2022.08.009. PMID: 35988744

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