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Cutis marmorata

MedGen UID:
78093
Concept ID:
C0263401
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Cutis Marmorata; Marmorata, Cutis
SNOMED CT: Cutis marmorata (26825009)
 
HPO: HP:0000965

Definition

A reticular discoloration of the skin with cyanotic (reddish-blue appearing) areas surrounding pale central areas due to dilation of capillary blood vessels and stagnation of blood within the vessels. Cutis marmorata generally occurs on the legs, arms and trunk and is often more severe in cold weather. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVCutis marmorata

Conditions with this feature

Coffin-Lowry syndrome
MedGen UID:
75556
Concept ID:
C0265252
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is usually characterized by severe-to-profound intellectual disability in males; less severely impaired individuals have been reported. Neuropsychiatric concerns can include behavioral problems, loss of strength, progressive spasticity or paraplegia, sleep apnea, or stroke. Stimulus-induced drop attacks (SIDAs) in which unexpected tactile or auditory stimuli or excitement triggers a brief collapse but no loss of consciousness are present in approximately 20% of affected individuals. Typically SIDAs begin between mid-childhood and the teens. Characteristic facial features may be more apparent with age. Upper-extremity differences may be subtle and include short, soft, fleshy hands with tapered fingers as well as fleshy forearms. Progressive kyphoscoliosis is one of the most difficult aspects of long-term care. Affected females tend to have intellectual disability in the mild-to-moderate range and may also have the typical facial, hand, and skeletal findings noted in males.
Primary hyperoxaluria, type I
MedGen UID:
75658
Concept ID:
C0268164
Disease or Syndrome
Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is caused by a deficiency of the liver peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate-aminotransferase (AGT), which catalyzes the conversion of glyoxylate to glycine. When AGT activity is absent, glyoxylate is converted to oxalate, which forms insoluble calcium oxalate crystals that accumulate in the kidney and other organs. Individuals with PH1 are at risk for recurrent nephrolithiasis (deposition of calcium oxalate in the renal pelvis / urinary tract), nephrocalcinosis (deposition of calcium oxalate in the renal parenchyma), or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Age at onset of symptoms ranges from infancy to the sixth decade. Approximately 10% of affected individuals present in infancy or early childhood with nephrocalcinosis, with or without nephrolithiasis, and failure to thrive related to renal failure. The majority of individuals with PH1 present in childhood or early adolescence, usually with symptomatic nephrolithiasis and normal or reduced kidney function. The remainder of affected individuals present in adulthood with recurrent renal stones and a mild-to-moderate reduction in kidney function. The natural history of untreated PH1 is one of progressive decline in renal function as a result of calcium oxalate deposits in kidney tissue and complications of nephrolithiasis (e.g., obstruction and infection) with eventual progression to oxalosis (widespread tissue deposition of calcium oxalate) and death from ESRD and/or complications of oxalosis.
Sneddon syndrome
MedGen UID:
76449
Concept ID:
C0282492
Disease or Syndrome
Sneddon syndrome is a noninflammatory arteriopathy characterized by onset of livedo reticularis in the second decade and onset of cerebrovascular disease in early adulthood (summary by Bras et al., 2014). Livedo reticularis occurs also with polyarteritis nodosa, systemic lupus erythematosus, and central thrombocythemia, any one of which may be accompanied by cerebrovascular accidents (Bruyn et al., 1987).
Congenital livedo reticularis
MedGen UID:
83381
Concept ID:
C0345419
Congenital Abnormality
Isolated and classic cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita (CMTC) are characterized by congenital skin changes including erythematous-to-violaceous, reticulated, net-like or marbled-appearing patches of skin that do not mostly or completely resolve with warming or any other acute intervention. Individuals with isolated CMTC have no other syndromic features, and skin lesions tend to fade or resolve. Those with classic CMTC may have accompanying hemihypoplasia with body asymmetry, skin atrophy or ulceration, other vascular malformations, and occasional ocular issues (early-onset glaucoma and/or peripheral retinal vascular attenuation) but do not have other malformations, dysmorphic features, or cognitive impairment. The most common location for the CMTC lesions is on the legs. An affected limb may also display weakness or be unusually susceptible to cold compared to an unaffected limb. In more than half of affected individuals, skin lesions will generally fade across a wide range in age (6 weeks to 26 years), most commonly in the first year of life, but may not resolve completely.
Lenz-Majewski hyperostosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
98483
Concept ID:
C0432269
Congenital Abnormality
Lenz-Majewski hyperostotic dwarfism is a rare condition characterized by intellectual disability, sclerosing bone dysplasia, distinct craniofacial and dental anomalies, loose skin, and distal limb anomalies, particularly brachydactyly and symphalangism. Patients have multiple radiographic abnormalities due to progressive generalized hyperostosis that affects the cranium, vertebrae, and diaphyses of tubular bones, leading to severe growth retardation (summary by Sousa et al., 2014).
Classic homocystinuria
MedGen UID:
199606
Concept ID:
C0751202
Disease or Syndrome
Homocystinuria caused by cystathionine ß-synthase (CBS) deficiency is characterized by involvement of the eye (ectopia lentis and/or severe myopia), skeletal system (excessive height, long limbs, scolioisis, and pectus excavatum), vascular system (thromboembolism), and CNS (developmental delay/intellectual disability). All four ? or only one ? of the systems can be involved; expressivity is variable for all of the clinical signs. It is not unusual for a previously asymptomatic individual to present in adult years with only a thromboembolic event that is often cerebrovascular. Two phenotypic variants are recognized, B6-responsive homocystinuria and B6-non-responsive homocystinuria. B6-responsive homocystinuria is usually milder than the non-responsive variant. Thromboembolism is the major cause of early death and morbidity. IQ in individuals with untreated homocystinuria ranges widely, from 10 to 138. In B6-responsive individuals the mean IQ is 79 versus 57 for those who are B6-non-responsive. Other features that may occur include: seizures, psychiatric problems, extrapyramidal signs (e.g., dystonia), hypopigmentation of the skin and hair, malar flush, livedo reticularis, and pancreatitis.
Congenital muscular hypertrophy-cerebral syndrome
MedGen UID:
315658
Concept ID:
C1802395
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
MOMO syndrome
MedGen UID:
371897
Concept ID:
C1834759
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare genetic overgrowth/obesity syndrome with characteristics of macrocephaly, obesity, mental (intellectual) disability and ocular abnormalities. Other frequent clinical signs include macrosomia, downslanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, broad nasal root, high and broad forehead and delay in bone maturation, in association with normal thyroid function and karyotype.
X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder
MedGen UID:
336844
Concept ID:
C1845050
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder shows more severe manifestations in hemizygous males compared to heterozygous females. Affected males have early onset of recurrent respiratory infections and failure to thrive resulting from inflammatory gastroenteritis or colitis. Patients also show reticular pigmentation abnormalities of the skin and may develop corneal scarring. Carrier females may be unaffected or have only pigmentary abnormalities along the lines of Blaschko (summary by Starokadomskyy et al., 2016).
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
339902
Concept ID:
C1853099
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
7q11.23 microduplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
347562
Concept ID:
C1857844
Disease or Syndrome
7q11.23 duplication syndrome is characterized by delayed motor, speech, and social skills in early childhood; neurologic abnormalities (hypotonia, adventitious movements, and abnormal gait and station); speech sound disorders including motor speech disorders (childhood apraxia of speech and/or dysarthria) and phonologic disorders; behavior problems including anxiety disorders (especially social anxiety disorder [social phobia]), selective mutism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional disorders, physical aggression, and autism spectrum disorder; and intellectual disability in some individuals. Distinctive facial features are common. Cardiovascular disease includes dilatation of the ascending aorta. Approximately 30% of individuals have one or more congenital anomalies.
Angiomatosis, diffuse Corticomeningeal, of Divry and van Bogaert
MedGen UID:
347234
Concept ID:
C1859783
Disease or Syndrome
Megalencephaly-capillary malformation-polymicrogyria syndrome
MedGen UID:
355421
Concept ID:
C1865285
Disease or Syndrome
PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS) encompasses a range of clinical findings in which the core features are congenital or early-childhood onset of segmental/focal overgrowth with or without cellular dysplasia. Prior to the identification of PIK3CA as the causative gene, PROS was separated into distinct clinical syndromes based on the tissues and/or organs involved (e.g., MCAP [megalencephaly-capillary malformation] syndrome and CLOVES [congenital lipomatous asymmetric overgrowth of the trunk, lymphatic, capillary, venous, and combined-type vascular malformations, epidermal nevi, skeletal and spinal anomalies] syndrome). The predominant areas of overgrowth include the brain, limbs (including fingers and toes), trunk (including abdomen and chest), and face, all usually in an asymmetric distribution. Generalized brain overgrowth may be accompanied by secondary overgrowth of specific brain structures resulting in ventriculomegaly, a markedly thick corpus callosum, and cerebellar tonsillar ectopia with crowding of the posterior fossa. Vascular malformations may include capillary, venous, and less frequently, arterial or mixed (capillary-lymphatic-venous or arteriovenous) malformations. Lymphatic malformations may be in various locations (internal and/or external) and can cause various clinical issues, including swelling, pain, and occasionally localized bleeding secondary to trauma. Lipomatous overgrowth may occur ipsilateral or contralateral to a vascular malformation, if present. The degree of intellectual disability appears to be mostly related to the presence and severity of seizures, cortical dysplasia (e.g., polymicrogyria), and hydrocephalus. Many children have feeding difficulties that are often multifactorial in nature. Endocrine issues affect a small number of individuals and most commonly include hypoglycemia (largely hypoinsulinemic hypoketotic hypoglycemia), hypothyroidism, and growth hormone deficiency.
Lethal polymalformative syndrome, Boissel type
MedGen UID:
414158
Concept ID:
C2752001
Congenital Abnormality
Growth retardation, developmental delay, and facial dysmorphism (GDFD) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by severe psychomotor retardation, poor overall growth, and dysmorphic facial features. Additional features may include cardiac malformations and deafness (summary by Daoud et al., 2016).
Warsaw breakage syndrome
MedGen UID:
462008
Concept ID:
C3150658
Disease or Syndrome
Warsaw syndrome is characterized by the clinical triad of severe congenital microcephaly, growth restriction, and sensorineural hearing loss due to cochlear hypoplasia. Intellectual disability is typically in the mild-to-moderate range. Severe speech delay is common. Gross and fine motor milestones are usually attained at the usual time, although a few individuals have mild delays. Additional common features include skeletal anomalies and cardiovascular anomalies. Abnormal skin pigmentation and genitourinary malformations have also been reported. Some individuals have had increased chromosome breakage and radial forms on cytogenetic testing of lymphocytes treated with diepoxybutane and mitomycin C.
Chromosome 1p32-p31 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
462386
Concept ID:
C3151036
Disease or Syndrome
For the purposes of this chapter, NFIA-related disorder is defined as heterozygous inactivation or disruption of only NFIA without involvement of adjacent or surrounding genes. NFIA-related disorder comprises central nervous system abnormalities (most commonly abnormalities of the corpus callosum) with or without urinary tract defects, such as unilateral or bilateral vesicoureteral reflux and hydronephrosis. Additional features include macrocephaly, seizures, developmental delay and/or cognitive impairment, nonspecific dysmorphic features, ventriculomegaly, and hypotonia, which can exacerbate motor delay and feeding issues in infancy. Rarer features may include strabismus, cutis marmorata, or craniosynostosis of the metopic, lambdoid, or sagittal suture.
Adams-Oliver syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
481812
Concept ID:
C3280182
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) of the scalp and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). ACC lesions usually occur in the midline of the parietal or occipital regions, but can also occur on the abdomen or limbs. At birth, an ACC lesion may already have the appearance of a healed scar. ACC lesions less than 5 cm often involve only the skin and almost always heal over a period of months; larger lesions are more likely to involve the skull and possibly the dura, and are at greater risk for complications, which can include infection, hemorrhage, or thrombosis, and can result in death. The limb defects range from mild (unilateral or bilateral short distal phalanges) to severe (complete absence of all toes or fingers, feet or hands, or more, often resembling an amputation). The lower extremities are almost always more severely affected than the upper extremities. Additional major features frequently include cardiovascular malformations/dysfunction (23%), brain anomalies, and less frequently renal, liver, and eye anomalies.
Coffin-Siris syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
482831
Concept ID:
C3281201
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is classically characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth and additional digits, developmental or cognitive delay of varying degree, distinctive facial features, hypotonia, hirsutism/hypertrichosis, and sparse scalp hair. Congenital anomalies can include malformations of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and/or central nervous systems. Other findings commonly include feeding difficulties, slow growth, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and hearing impairment.
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
763817
Concept ID:
C3550903
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
766431
Concept ID:
C3553517
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Malan overgrowth syndrome
MedGen UID:
766574
Concept ID:
C3553660
Disease or Syndrome
Malan syndrome (MALNS) is clinically characterized by overgrowth, advanced bone age, macrocephaly, and dysmorphic facial features. Patients develop marfanoid habitus, with long and slender body, very low body mass, long narrow face, and arachnodactyly, with age. Impaired intellectual development and behavior anomalies are present (summary by Martinez et al., 2015).
Partial lipodystrophy, congenital cataracts, and neurodegeneration syndrome
MedGen UID:
813897
Concept ID:
C3807567
Disease or Syndrome
Lipodystrophies are rare disorders characterized by loss of body fat from various regions and predisposition to metabolic complications of insulin resistance and lipid abnormalities. FPLD7 is an autosomal dominant disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Additional features, including early-onset cataracts and later onset of spasticity of the lower limbs, have been noted in some patients (summary by Garg et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660.
Adams-Oliver syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
815422
Concept ID:
C3809092
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) of the scalp and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). ACC lesions usually occur in the midline of the parietal or occipital regions, but can also occur on the abdomen or limbs. At birth, an ACC lesion may already have the appearance of a healed scar. ACC lesions less than 5 cm often involve only the skin and almost always heal over a period of months; larger lesions are more likely to involve the skull and possibly the dura, and are at greater risk for complications, which can include infection, hemorrhage, or thrombosis, and can result in death. The limb defects range from mild (unilateral or bilateral short distal phalanges) to severe (complete absence of all toes or fingers, feet or hands, or more, often resembling an amputation). The lower extremities are almost always more severely affected than the upper extremities. Additional major features frequently include cardiovascular malformations/dysfunction (23%), brain anomalies, and less frequently renal, liver, and eye anomalies.
Moyamoya disease with early-onset achalasia
MedGen UID:
816733
Concept ID:
C3810403
Disease or Syndrome
Moyamoya disease-6 is a progressive vasculopathy characterized by occlusion of the terminal portion of the internal carotid arteries and its branches, and the formation of compensatory neovascularization and the moyamoya, or 'puff of smoke,' appearance of these vessels on angiogram. Affected individuals may present with ischemic strokes, intracerebral hemorrhage, or transient ischemic attacks. Patients with MYMY6 usually present early in life with achalasia. Hypertension and Raynaud phenomenon may be associated features (summary by Wallace et al., 2016; Herve et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of moyamoya disease, see MYMY1 (252350).
Vasculitis due to ADA2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2.
STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy
MedGen UID:
863159
Concept ID:
C4014722
Disease or Syndrome
STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy is an autoinflammatory vasculopathy causing severe skin lesions, particularly affecting the face, ears, nose, and digits, and resulting in ulceration, eschar formation, necrosis, and, in some cases, amputation. Many patients have interstitial lung disease. Tissue biopsy and laboratory findings show a hyperinflammatory state, with evidence of increased beta-interferon (IFNB1; 147640) signaling (summary by Liu et al., 2014).
Megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly-hydrocephalus syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
863175
Concept ID:
C4014738
Disease or Syndrome
MPPH (megalencephaly-postaxial polydactyly-polymicrogyria-hydrocephalus) syndrome is a developmental brain disorder characterized by megalencephaly (brain overgrowth) with the cortical malformation bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (BPP). At birth the occipital frontal circumference (OFC) ranges from normal to 6 standard deviations (SD) above the mean for age, sex, and gestational age; in older individuals the range is from 3 to 10 SD above the mean. A variable degree of ventriculomegaly is seen in almost all children with MPPH syndrome; nearly 50% of individuals have frank hydrocephalus. Neurologic problems associated with BPP include oromotor dysfunction (100%), epilepsy (50%), and mild-to-severe intellectual disability (100%). Postaxial hexadactyly occurs in 50% of individuals with MPPH syndrome.
Adams-Oliver syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
908556
Concept ID:
C4225271
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) of the scalp and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). ACC lesions usually occur in the midline of the parietal or occipital regions, but can also occur on the abdomen or limbs. At birth, an ACC lesion may already have the appearance of a healed scar. ACC lesions less than 5 cm often involve only the skin and almost always heal over a period of months; larger lesions are more likely to involve the skull and possibly the dura, and are at greater risk for complications, which can include infection, hemorrhage, or thrombosis, and can result in death. The limb defects range from mild (unilateral or bilateral short distal phalanges) to severe (complete absence of all toes or fingers, feet or hands, or more, often resembling an amputation). The lower extremities are almost always more severely affected than the upper extremities. Additional major features frequently include cardiovascular malformations/dysfunction (23%), brain anomalies, and less frequently renal, liver, and eye anomalies.
Trichothiodystrophy 5, nonphotosensitive
MedGen UID:
899675
Concept ID:
C4225420
Disease or Syndrome
Trichothiodystrophy-5 (TTD5) is an X-linked disorder characterized by sparse and brittle hair, facial dysmorphism, global developmental delays, growth deficiency, hypogonadism, and structural brain abnormalities (summary by Mendelsohn et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of trichothiodystrophy, see TTD1 (601675).
Congenital heart defects and skeletal malformations syndrome
MedGen UID:
1618340
Concept ID:
C4539857
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital heart defects and skeletal malformations syndrome (CHDSKM) is characterized by atrial and ventricular septal defects, with aortic root dilation in adulthood. Skeletal defects are variable and include pectus excavatum, scoliosis, and finger contractures, and some patients exhibit joint laxity. Failure to thrive is observed during infancy and early childhood (Wang et al., 2017).
Adams-Oliver syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1635567
Concept ID:
C4551482
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) of the scalp and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). ACC lesions usually occur in the midline of the parietal or occipital regions, but can also occur on the abdomen or limbs. At birth, an ACC lesion may already have the appearance of a healed scar. ACC lesions less than 5 cm often involve only the skin and almost always heal over a period of months; larger lesions are more likely to involve the skull and possibly the dura, and are at greater risk for complications, which can include infection, hemorrhage, or thrombosis, and can result in death. The limb defects range from mild (unilateral or bilateral short distal phalanges) to severe (complete absence of all toes or fingers, feet or hands, or more, often resembling an amputation). The lower extremities are almost always more severely affected than the upper extremities. Additional major features frequently include cardiovascular malformations/dysfunction (23%), brain anomalies, and less frequently renal, liver, and eye anomalies.
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1645760
Concept ID:
C4551851
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Intellectual disability and myopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1808193
Concept ID:
C5676904
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual disability and myopathy syndrome (IDMYS) is an autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with mildly impaired intellectual development, hypotonia, muscle weakness and fatigue, and white matter abnormalities on brain imaging. Variable additional features may include sensorineural hearing loss, dysmorphic facies, and progressive heart disease (summary by Smeland et al., 2019).
Tessadori-van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1810348
Concept ID:
C5676922
Disease or Syndrome
Tessadori-Bicknell-van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome-1 (TEBIVANED1) is characterized by poor overall growth with short stature, microcephaly, hypotonia, profound global developmental delay often with poor or absent speech, and characteristic dysmorphic facial features, including hypertelorism and abnormal nose. Other variable neurologic and systemic features may also occur (Tessadori et al., 2017). Genetic Heterogeneity of Tessadori-van Haaften Neurodevelopmental Syndrome See also TEBIVANED2 (619759), caused by mutation in the H4C11 gene (602826); TEBIVANED3 (619950), caused by mutation in the H4C5 gene (602830); and TEBIVANED4 (619951), caused by mutation in the H4C9 gene (602833).
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 21
MedGen UID:
1824003
Concept ID:
C5774230
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia-21 (DBA21) is an autosomal recessive bone marrow failure syndrome that includes selective erythroid hypoplasia, anemia with transient thrombocytopenia, short stature, facial dysmorphism, limb abnormalities, cardiac defects, and intellectual disability (O'Donohue et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Diamond-Blackfan anemia, see DBA1 (105650).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with impaired language, behavioral abnormalities, and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1847194
Concept ID:
C5882686
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with impaired language, behavioral abnormalities, and dysmorphic facies (NEDLBF) is characterized by global developmental delay, speech delay, variably impaired intellectual development, behavioral abnormalities, and dysmorphic facial features. The phenotype and severity of the disorder is heterogeneous, ranging from borderline to severe. Brain imaging is usually normal. More variable additional features include early feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, short stature, mild visual impairment, hypotonia, seizures (particularly febrile), and distal skeletal defects of the hands and feet (Jia et al., 2022).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Dudoignon B, Huber C, Michot C, Di Rocco F, Girard M, Lyonnet S, Rio M, Rabia SH, Daire VC, Baujat G
Am J Med Genet A 2020 Jan;182(1):29-37. Epub 2019 Oct 25 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.61364. PMID: 31654484
Rozas-Muñoz E, Frieden IJ, Roé E, Puig L, Baselga E
Pediatr Dermatol 2016 Nov;33(6):570-584. Epub 2016 Jul 25 doi: 10.1111/pde.12939. PMID: 27456075
Memarzadeh A, Pengas I, Syed S, Eastwood DM
Br J Dermatol 2014 Mar;170(3):681-6. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12700. PMID: 24641785

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Snyder KAM, Voelckers AD
Am Fam Physician 2024 Mar;109(3):212-216. PMID: 38574210
Amaral J, Peixoto S, Mimoso G, Pereira D
BMJ Case Rep 2018 Jan 12;2018 doi: 10.1136/bcr-2017-222269. PMID: 29330270Free PMC Article
Maraña Pérez AI, Ruiz-Falcó Rojas ML, Puertas Martín V, Domínguez Carral J, Carreras Sáez I, Duat Rodríguez A, Sánchez González V
Neurologia 2017 Jul-Aug;32(6):363-370. Epub 2016 Mar 8 doi: 10.1016/j.nrl.2015.12.012. PMID: 26964511
Happle R
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2015 Dec;29(12):2295-305. Epub 2015 Apr 10 doi: 10.1111/jdv.13147. PMID: 25864701
Lobo-Mueller E, Amaral JG, Babyn PS, Wang Q, John P
Semin Musculoskelet Radiol 2009 Sep;13(3):255-76. Epub 2009 Sep 1 doi: 10.1055/s-0029-1237692. PMID: 19724993

Diagnosis

Rayala BZ, Morrell DS
FP Essent 2017 Feb;453:11-17. PMID: 28196316
Gontijo B
Clin Dermatol 2014 Jul-Aug;32(4):471-6. Epub 2014 Feb 28 doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2014.02.002. PMID: 25017458
Blei F, Guarini A
Clin Dermatol 2014 Jul-Aug;32(4):459-70. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2014.02.001. PMID: 25017457
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Australas J Dermatol 2011 Aug;52(3):159-66. Epub 2011 Apr 19 doi: 10.1111/j.1440-0960.2011.00749.x. PMID: 21834809
Puttgen KB, Lin DD
Childs Nerv Syst 2010 Oct;26(10):1407-15. Epub 2010 Jun 27 doi: 10.1007/s00381-010-1201-3. PMID: 20582592

Therapy

Yu T, Liu L, Xu F, Wu D, Su Y, Sun Q
Undersea Hyperb Med 2020 Second Quarter;47(2):267-270. doi: 10.22462/04.06.2020.13. PMID: 32574444
Blei F, Guarini A
Clin Dermatol 2014 Jul-Aug;32(4):459-70. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2014.02.001. PMID: 25017457
Tasios K, Sidiras GG, Kalentzos V, Pyrpasopoulou A
Diving Hyperb Med 2014 Mar;44(1):45-7. PMID: 24687485
Redondo P, Aguado L, Martínez-Cuesta A
J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 Nov;65(5):909-23; quiz 924. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2011.03.009. PMID: 22000871
Bostanci I, Sarioģlu A, Ergin H, Akşit A, Cinbiş M, Akalin N
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2001 Sep-Oct;14(8):1161-2. doi: 10.1515/jpem-2001-0815. PMID: 11592576

Prognosis

Porwal M, Anderson D, Razzak AN, Fitzgerald G
BMJ Case Rep 2022 Dec 26;15(12) doi: 10.1136/bcr-2022-249587. PMID: 36572450Free PMC Article
Bui TNPT, Corap A, Bygum A
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2019 Dec 4;14(1):283. doi: 10.1186/s13023-019-1229-8. PMID: 31801575Free PMC Article
Amaral J, Peixoto S, Mimoso G, Pereira D
BMJ Case Rep 2018 Jan 12;2018 doi: 10.1136/bcr-2017-222269. PMID: 29330270Free PMC Article
Rozas-Muñoz E, Frieden IJ, Roé E, Puig L, Baselga E
Pediatr Dermatol 2016 Nov;33(6):570-584. Epub 2016 Jul 25 doi: 10.1111/pde.12939. PMID: 27456075
Gontijo B
Clin Dermatol 2014 Jul-Aug;32(4):471-6. Epub 2014 Feb 28 doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2014.02.002. PMID: 25017458

Clinical prediction guides

Schnabel F, Kamphausen SB, Funke R, Kaulfuß S, Wollnik B, Zenker M
Am J Med Genet A 2021 Mar;185(3):850-855. Epub 2020 Dec 7 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.62009. PMID: 33283961
Bui TNPT, Corap A, Bygum A
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2019 Dec 4;14(1):283. doi: 10.1186/s13023-019-1229-8. PMID: 31801575Free PMC Article
Loughan AR, Harrell M, Perna R, Allen A, Suddarth B
Appl Neuropsychol Child 2017 Oct-Dec;6(4):369-377. Epub 2016 May 23 doi: 10.1080/21622965.2016.1182432. PMID: 27216985
Maraña Pérez AI, Ruiz-Falcó Rojas ML, Puertas Martín V, Domínguez Carral J, Carreras Sáez I, Duat Rodríguez A, Sánchez González V
Neurologia 2017 Jul-Aug;32(6):363-370. Epub 2016 Mar 8 doi: 10.1016/j.nrl.2015.12.012. PMID: 26964511
Weston WL, Morelli JG, Lee LA
J Am Acad Dermatol 1999 May;40(5 Pt 1):675-81. doi: 10.1016/s0190-9622(99)70146-5. PMID: 10321592

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