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Camptodactyly of finger

MedGen UID:
98041
Concept ID:
C0409348
Anatomical Abnormality; Finding; Finding
Synonyms: Camptodactyly of proximal interphalangeal joint; Flexion contractures (PIP joints); Flexion contractures of proximal interphalangeal joints
SNOMED CT: Flexion contracture of proximal interphalangeal joint (202281000); Flexion contracture of proximal interphalangeal joint of finger (202281000)
 
HPO: HP:0100490

Definition

The distal interphalangeal joint and/or the proximal interphalangeal joint of the fingers cannot be extended to 180 degrees by either active or passive extension. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Lowe syndrome
MedGen UID:
18145
Concept ID:
C0028860
Disease or Syndrome
Lowe syndrome (oculocerebrorenal syndrome) is characterized by involvement of the eyes, central nervous system, and kidneys. Dense congenital cataracts are found in all affected boys and infantile glaucoma in approximately 50%. All boys have impaired vision; corrected acuity is rarely better than 20/100. Generalized hypotonia is noted at birth and is of central (brain) origin. Deep tendon reflexes are usually absent. Hypotonia may slowly improve with age, but normal motor tone and strength are never achieved. Motor milestones are delayed. Almost all affected males have some degree of intellectual disability; 10%-25% function in the low-normal or borderline range, approximately 25% in the mild-to-moderate range, and 50%-65% in the severe-to-profound range of intellectual disability. Affected males have varying degrees of proximal renal tubular dysfunction of the Fanconi type, including low molecular-weight (LMW) proteinuria, aminoaciduria, bicarbonate wasting and renal tubular acidosis, phosphaturia with hypophosphatemia and renal rickets, hypercalciuria, sodium and potassium wasting, and polyuria. The features of symptomatic Fanconi syndrome do not usually become manifest until after the first few months of life, except for LMW proteinuria. Glomerulosclerosis associated with chronic tubular injury usually results in slowly progressive chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease between the second and fourth decades of life.
Waardenburg syndrome type 3
MedGen UID:
86948
Concept ID:
C0079661
Disease or Syndrome
Waardenburg syndrome type 3 is an auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the hair, skin, and eyes; congenital sensorineural hearing loss; presence of 'dystopia canthorum,' the lateral displacement of the ocular inner canthi; and upper limb abnormalities (reviews by Read and Newton, 1997 and Pingault et al., 2010). WS type 3 is also referred to as 'Klein-Waardenburg syndrome' (Gorlin et al., 1976). Clinical Variability of Waardenburg Syndrome Types 1-4 Waardenburg syndrome has been classified into 4 main phenotypes. Type I Waardenburg syndrome (WS1; 193500) is characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the hair, including a white forelock and premature graying; pigmentary changes of the iris, such as heterochromia iridis and brilliant blue eyes; congenital sensorineural hearing loss; and 'dystopia canthorum.' WS type II (WS2) is distinguished from type I by the absence of dystopia canthorum. WS type III has dystopia canthorum and is distinguished by the presence of upper limb abnormalities. WS type IV (WS4; 277580), also known as Waardenburg-Shah syndrome, has the additional feature of Hirschsprung disease (reviews by Read and Newton, 1997 and Pingault et al., 2010).
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-I-H/S
MedGen UID:
88566
Concept ID:
C0086431
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common.
Gordon syndrome
MedGen UID:
66314
Concept ID:
C0220666
Disease or Syndrome
DA3, or Gordon syndrome, is distinguished from other distal arthrogryposes by short stature and cleft palate (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009). There are 2 syndromes with features overlapping those of DA3 that are also caused by heterozygous mutation in PIEZO2: distal arthrogryposis type 5 (DA5; 108145) and Marden-Walker syndrome (MWKS; 248700), which are distinguished by the presence of ocular abnormalities and mental retardation, respectively. McMillin et al. (2014) suggested that the 3 disorders may represent variable expressivity of the same condition. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal arthrogryposis, see DA1 (108120).
Femoral hypoplasia - unusual facies syndrome
MedGen UID:
120523
Concept ID:
C0265263
Disease or Syndrome
Femoral-facial syndrome (FFS), also known as femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome (FHUFS), is a rare and sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome comprising bilateral femoral hypoplasia and characteristic facial features, such as long philtrum, thin upper lip, micrognathia with or without cleft palate, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, and a short nose with broad tip. Other features, such as renal anomalies, are more variable (summary by Nowaczyk et al., 2010).
Junctional epidermolysis bullosa, non-Herlitz type
MedGen UID:
82798
Concept ID:
C0268374
Disease or Syndrome
Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is characterized by fragility of the skin and mucous membranes, manifest by blistering with little or no trauma. Blistering may be severe and granulation tissue can form on the skin around the oral and nasal cavities, fingers and toes, and internally around the upper airway. Blisters generally heal with no significant scarring. Broad classification of JEB includes JEB generalized severe and JEB generalized intermediate. In JEB generalized severe, blisters are present at birth or become apparent in the neonatal period. Congenital malformations of the urinary tract and bladder may also occur. In JEB generalized intermediate, the phenotype may be mild with blistering localized to hands, feet, knees, and elbows with or without renal or ureteral involvement. Some individuals never blister after the newborn period. Additional features shared by JEB and the other major forms of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) include congenital localized absence of skin (aplasia cutis congenita), milia, nail dystrophy, scarring alopecia, hypotrichosis, pseudosyndactyly, and other contractures.
Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia
MedGen UID:
96581
Concept ID:
C0432215
Congenital Abnormality
Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by predominant involvement of articular cartilage with progressive joint stiffness and enlargement in the absence of inflammation. Onset – typically between ages three and six years – begins with the involvement of the interphalangeal joints. Over time, involvement of large joints and the spine causes significant joint contractures, gait disturbance, and scoliosis and/or kyphosis, resulting in abnormal posture and significant morbidity. Despite the considerable arthropathy, pain is not a major presenting feature of this condition. Initially height is normal; however, short stature (<3rd centile) becomes evident in adolescence as the skeletal changes progress.
Osteoglophonic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
96592
Concept ID:
C0432283
Congenital Abnormality
Osteoglophonic dysplasia (OGD) is characterized by rhizomelic dwarfism, nonossifying bone lesions, craniosynostosis, prominent supraorbital ridge, and depressed nasal bridge (summary by White et al., 2005).
Kapur-Toriello syndrome
MedGen UID:
208654
Concept ID:
C0796005
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare syndrome with characteristics of facial dysmorphism, severe intellectual deficiency, cardiac and intestinal anomalies, and growth retardation. Only four cases have been reported in the literature, in three unrelated families. Dysmorphic features include bilateral cleft lip and palate, bulbous nasal tip and eye anomalies. The condition seems to be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait.
Prominent glabella-microcephaly-hypogenitalism syndrome
MedGen UID:
162900
Concept ID:
C0796024
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare syndrome described in two siblings with manifestation of prenatal onset of growth deficiency, microcephaly, hypoplastic genitalia, and birth onset of convulsions.
Fetal akinesia deformation sequence 1
MedGen UID:
220903
Concept ID:
C1276035
Disease or Syndrome
Decreased fetal activity associated with multiple joint contractures, facial anomalies and pulmonary hypoplasia. Ultrasound examination may reveal polyhydramnios, ankylosis, scalp edema, and decreased chest movements (reflecting pulmonary hypoplasia).
Bethlem myopathy
MedGen UID:
331805
Concept ID:
C1834674
Disease or Syndrome
Bethlem myopathy-1 (BTHLM1) is a congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by distal joint laxity and a combination of distal and proximal joint contractures. Weakness usually begins in mid-childhood or adolescence, but progression is slow and ambulation is retained into adulthood (summary by Butterfield et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bethlem Myopathy See Bethlem myopathy-1B (BTHLM1B; 620725), caused by mutation in the COL6A2 gene (120240) on chromosome 21q22; Bethlem myopathy-1C (620726), caused by mutation the COL6A3 gene (120250) on chromosome 2q37; and Bethlem myopathy-2 (BTHLM2; 616471), caused by mutation in the COL12A1 gene (120320) on chromosome 6q13-q14.
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with congenital joint dislocations
MedGen UID:
373381
Concept ID:
C1837657
Disease or Syndrome
CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), clubfeet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect and vision are normal.
Chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
334629
Concept ID:
C1842870
Disease or Syndrome
The constitutional deletion of chromosome 1p36 results in a syndrome with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation (Shapira et al., 1997). Monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion syndrome in humans, occurring in 1 in 5,000 births (Shaffer and Lupski, 2000; Heilstedt et al., 2003). See also neurodevelopmental disorder with or without anomalies of the brain, eye, or heart (NEDBEH; 616975), which shows overlapping features and is caused by heterozygous mutation in the RERE gene (605226) on proximal chromosome 1p36. See also Radio-Tartaglia syndrome (RATARS; 619312), caused by mutation in the SPEN gene (613484) on chromosome 1p36, which shows overlapping features.
Terminal osseous dysplasia-pigmentary defects syndrome
MedGen UID:
335344
Concept ID:
C1846129
Disease or Syndrome
Terminal osseous dysplasia is an X-linked dominant male-lethal disease characterized by skeletal dysplasia of the limbs, pigmentary defects of the skin, and recurrent digital fibroma during infancy (Sun et al., 2010).
Digitotalar dysmorphism; ulnar drift, hereditary
MedGen UID:
342156
Concept ID:
C1852085
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
342798
Concept ID:
C1853100
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome-4 (COFS4) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, arthrogryposis, and neurologic abnormalities. Cellular studies show a defect in both transcription-coupled and global genome nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER and GG-NER) (summary by Jaspers et al., 2007 and Kashiyama et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome, see 214150.
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
342799
Concept ID:
C1853102
Disease or Syndrome
Any COFS syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ERCC2 gene.
Mesomelic dwarfism-cleft palate-camptodactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
340833
Concept ID:
C1855273
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndrome characterised by mesomelic shortening and bowing of the limbs, camptodactyly, skin dimpling and cleft palate with retrognathia and mandibular hypoplasia. It has been described in a brother and sister born to consanguineous parents. Transmission is autosomal recessive.
Autosomal recessive distal spinal muscular atrophy 1
MedGen UID:
388083
Concept ID:
C1858517
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-1 (HMNR1) is characterized by distal and proximal muscle weakness and diaphragmatic palsy that leads to respiratory distress. Without intervention, most infants with the severe form of the disease die before 2 years of age. Affected individuals present in infancy with inspiratory stridor, weak cry, recurrent bronchopneumonia, and swallowing difficulties. The disorder is caused by distal and progressive motor neuronopathy resulting in muscle weakness (summary by Perego et al., 2020). Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Recessive Distal Hereditary Motor Neuronopathy See also HMNR2 (605726), caused by mutation in the SIGMAR1 gene (601978); HMNR3 (607088) (encompassing Harding HMN types III and IV), which maps to chromosome 11q13; HMNR4 (611067), caused by mutation in the PLEKHG5 gene (611101); HMNR5 (614881), caused by mutation in the DNAJB2 gene (604139); HMNR6 (620011), caused by mutation in the REEP1 gene (609139); HMNR7 (619216), caused by mutation in the VWA1 gene (611901); HMNR8 (618912), caused by mutation in the SORD gene (182500); HMNR9 (620402), caused by mutation in the COQ7 gene (601683); and HMRN10 (620542), caused by mutation in the VRK1 gene (602168).
Autosomal recessive palmoplantar keratoderma and congenital alopecia
MedGen UID:
347851
Concept ID:
C1859316
Disease or Syndrome
Palmoplantar keratoderma and congenital alopecia-2 (PPKCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital alopecia and progressive hyperkeratosis resulting in sclerodactyly, severe contractures and tapering of the digits, and pseudoainhum formation. Nail changes occur in some patients (Castori et al., 2010). Also see PPKCA1 (104100), a less severe, autosomal dominant disorder.
Distal arthrogryposis type 10
MedGen UID:
349990
Concept ID:
C1861238
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic distal arthrogryposis syndrome with characteristics of plantar flexion contractures typically presenting with toe-walking in infancy, variably associated with milder contractures of the hip, elbow, wrist and finger joints. No ocular or neurological abnormalities are associated and serum creatine phosphokinase levels are normal.
Syndactyly type 5
MedGen UID:
350010
Concept ID:
C1861348
Congenital Abnormality
A very rare congenital limb malformation with characteristics of postaxial syndactyly of hands and feet, associated with metacarpal and metatarsal fusion of fourth and fifth digits. So far, less than ten reports have been described in the literature. Soft tissue syndactyly (involving the third and fourth fingers and the second and third toes) may be present. The locus associated with SD5 maps to 2q31-q32. Mutations in the HOXD13 gene may be causative. The condition is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.
H syndrome
MedGen UID:
400532
Concept ID:
C1864445
Disease or Syndrome
The histiocytosis-lymphadenopathy plus syndrome comprises features of 4 histiocytic disorders previously thought to be distinct: Faisalabad histiocytosis (FHC), sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), H syndrome, and pigmented hypertrichosis with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus syndrome (PHID). FHC was described as an autosomal recessive disease involving joint deformities, sensorineural hearing loss, and subsequent development of generalized lymphadenopathy and swellings in the eyelids that contain histiocytes (summary by Morgan et al., 2010). SHML, or familial Rosai-Dorfman disease, was described as a rare cause of lymph node enlargement in children, consisting of chronic massive enlargement of cervical lymph nodes frequently accompanied by fever, leukocytosis, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Extranodal sites were involved in approximately 25% of patients, including salivary glands, orbit, eyelid, spleen, and testes. The involvement of retropharyngeal lymphoid tissue sometimes caused snoring and sleep apnea (summary by Kismet et al., 2005). H syndrome was characterized by cutaneous hyperpigmentation and hypertrichosis, hepatosplenomegaly, heart anomalies, and hypogonadism; hearing loss was also found in about half of patients, and many had short stature. PHID was characterized by predominantly antibody-negative insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus associated with pigmented hypertrichosis and variable occurrence of other features of H syndrome, with hepatosplenomegaly occurring in about half of patients (Cliffe et al., 2009). Bolze et al. (2012) noted that mutations in the SLC29A3 gene (612373) had been implicated in H syndrome, PHID, FHC, and SHML, and that some patients presented a combination of features from 2 or more of these syndromes, leading to the suggestion that these phenotypes should be grouped together as 'SLC29A3 disorder.' Bolze et al. (2012) suggested that the histologic features of the lesions seemed to be the most uniform phenotype in these patients. In addition, the immunophenotype of infiltrating cells in H syndrome patients was shown to be the same as that seen in patients with the familial form of Rosai-Dorfman disease, further supporting the relationship between these disorders (Avitan-Hersh et al., 2011; Colmenero et al., 2012).
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, spondylocheirodysplastic type
MedGen UID:
393515
Concept ID:
C2676510
Disease or Syndrome
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome spondylodysplastic type 3 (EDSSPD3) is characterized by short stature, hyperelastic skin and hypermobile joints, protuberant eyes with bluish sclerae, finely wrinkled palms, and characteristic radiologic features (Giunta et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of the spondylodysplastic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, see 130070.
Fibrosis of extraocular muscles, congenital, 3A, with or without extraocular involvement
MedGen UID:
412638
Concept ID:
C2748801
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) encompasses several different inherited strabismus syndromes characterized by congenital restrictive ophthalmoplegia affecting extraocular muscles innervated by the oculomotor and/or trochlear nerves. If all affected members of a family have classic CFEOM with bilateral involvement and inability to raise the eyes above midline, the phenotype is classified as CFEOM1 (135700). CFEOM2 (602078) shows autosomal recessive inheritance. CFEOM3 is characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance of a more variable phenotype than classic CFEOM1. Individuals with CFEOM3 may not have bilateral involvement, may be able to raise the eyes above midline, or may not have blepharoptosis (reviews by Yamada et al., 2004 and Heidary et al., 2008). Yamada et al. (2003) concluded that CFEOM3 is a relatively rare form of CFEOM. Genetic Heterogeneity of CFEOM3 The CFEOM3 phenotype is genetically heterogeneous; see also CFEOM3B (135700), caused by mutation in the KIF21A gene on chromosome 12q12, and CFEOM3C (609384), which maps to chromosome 13q.
Camptodactyly of fingers
MedGen UID:
416550
Concept ID:
C2751430
Disease or Syndrome
Camptodactyly is defined as a permanent flexion contrature of 1 or both fifth fingers at the proximal interphalangeal joints. Additional fingers might be affected, but the little finger is always involved. Usually the condition appears to be sporadic in a family, but clinical examination of relatives reveals that it is an autosomal dominant condition subject to incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity (summary by Malik et al., 2008).
Familial hypertryptophanemia
MedGen UID:
419177
Concept ID:
C2931837
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital hypertryptophanemia, which is accompanied by hyperserotonemia, does not appear to have significant clinical consequences (Ferreira et al., 2017).
Geleophysic dysplasia 1
MedGen UID:
479777
Concept ID:
C3278147
Disease or Syndrome
Geleophysic dysplasia, a progressive condition resembling a lysosomal storage disorder, is characterized by short stature, short hands and feet, progressive joint limitation and contractures, distinctive facial features, progressive cardiac valvular disease, and thickened skin. Intellect is normal. Major findings are likely to be present in the first year of life. Cardiac, respiratory, and lung involvement result in death before age five years in approximately 33% of individuals with ADAMTSL2-related geleophysic dysplasia.
MEGF10-related myopathy
MedGen UID:
482309
Concept ID:
C3280679
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-10A (CMYP10A) is a severe autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by generalized hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency, and poor feeding apparent from birth. Decreased fetal movements may be observed. More variable features include high-arched palate, distal joint contractures, foot deformities, scoliosis, areflexia, and dysphagia. Many patients show eventration of the diaphragm. Affected individuals become ventilator-dependent in the first months or years of life and never achieve walking; many die in childhood (Logan et al., 2011). Patients with more damaging mutations in the MEGF10 gene, including nonsense or frameshift null mutations, show the more severe phenotype (CMYP10A), whereas those with missense mutations affecting conserved cysteine residues in the EGF-like domain show the less severe phenotype with later onset of respiratory failure and minicores on muscle biopsy (CMYP10B) (Croci et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Meckel syndrome, type 1
MedGen UID:
811346
Concept ID:
C3714506
Disease or Syndrome
Meckel syndrome, also known as Meckel-Gruber syndrome, is a severe pleiotropic autosomal recessive developmental disorder caused by dysfunction of primary cilia during early embryogenesis. There is extensive clinical variability and controversy as to the minimum diagnostic criteria. Early reports, including that of Opitz and Howe (1969) and Wright et al. (1994), stated that the classic triad of Meckel syndrome comprises (1) cystic renal disease; (2) a central nervous system malformation, most commonly occipital encephalocele; and (3) polydactyly, most often postaxial. However, based on a study of 67 patients, Salonen (1984) concluded that the minimum diagnostic criteria are (1) cystic renal disease; (2) CNS malformation, and (3) hepatic abnormalities, including portal fibrosis or ductal proliferation. In a review of Meckel syndrome, Logan et al. (2011) stated that the classic triad first described by Meckel (1822) included occipital encephalocele, cystic kidneys, and fibrotic changes to the liver. Genetic Heterogeneity of Meckel Syndrome See also MKS2 (603194), caused by mutation in the TMEM216 gene (613277) on chromosome 11q12; MKS3 (607361), caused by mutation in the TMEM67 gene (609884) on chromosome 8q; MKS4 (611134), caused by mutation in the CEP290 gene (610142) on chromosome 12q; MKS5 (611561), caused by mutation in the RPGRIP1L gene (610937) on chromosome 16q12; MKS6 (612284), caused by mutation in the CC2D2A gene (612013) on chromosome 4p15; MKS7 (267010), caused by mutation in the NPHP3 (608002) gene on chromosome 3q22; MKS8 (613885), caused by mutation in the TCTN2 gene (613846) on chromosome 12q24; MKS9 (614209), caused by mutation in the B9D1 gene (614144) on chromosome 17p11; MKS10 (614175), caused by mutation in the B9D2 gene (611951) on chromosome 19q13; MKS11 (615397), caused by mutation in the TMEM231 gene (614949) on chromosome 16q23; MKS12 (616258), caused by mutation in the KIF14 gene (611279) on chromosome 1q32; MKS13 (617562), caused by mutation in the TMEM107 gene (616183) on chromosome 17p13; and MKS14 (619879), caused by mutation in the TXNDC15 gene (617778) on chromosome 5q31.
Autism spectrum disorder - epilepsy - arthrogryposis syndrome
MedGen UID:
816240
Concept ID:
C3809910
Disease or Syndrome
Arthrogryposis, impaired intellectual development, and seizures (AMRS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal abnormalities, including arthrogryposis, short limbs, and vertebral malformations, impaired intellectual development, and seizures consistent with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy in some patients. Other features may include cleft palate, micrognathia, posterior embryotoxon, talipes valgus, rocker-bottom feet, and dysmorphic facies (Edmondson et al., 2017; Marini et al., 2017).
Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
897005
Concept ID:
C4225419
Disease or Syndrome
Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome (RSS) is a clinically recognizable condition that includes the cardinal findings of craniofacial features, cerebellar defects, and cardiovascular malformations resulting in the alternate diagnostic name of 3C syndrome. Dysmorphic facial features may include brachycephaly, hypotonic face with protruding tongue, flat appearance of the face on profile view, short midface, widely spaced eyes, downslanted palpebral fissures, low-set ears with overfolding of the upper helix, smooth or short philtrum, and high or cleft palate. Affected individuals also typically have a characteristic metacarpal phalangeal profile showing a consistent wavy pattern on hand radiographs. RSS is associated with variable degrees of developmental delay and intellectual disability. Eye anomalies and hypercholesterolemia may be variably present.
Frontometaphyseal dysplasia 1
MedGen UID:
923943
Concept ID:
C4281559
Congenital Abnormality
The X-linked otopalatodigital (X-OPD) spectrum disorders, characterized primarily by skeletal dysplasia, include the following: Otopalatodigital syndrome type 1 (OPD1). Otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 (OPD2). Frontometaphyseal dysplasia type 1 (FMD1). Melnick-Needles syndrome (MNS). Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary skin defects (TODPD). In OPD1, most manifestations are present at birth; females can present with severity similar to affected males, although some have only mild manifestations. In OPD2, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Most males with OPD2 die during the first year of life, usually from thoracic hypoplasia resulting in pulmonary insufficiency. Males who live beyond the first year of life are usually developmentally delayed and require respiratory support and assistance with feeding. In FMD1, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Males do not experience a progressive skeletal dysplasia but may have joint contractures and hand and foot malformations. Progressive scoliosis is observed in both affected males and females. In MNS, wide phenotypic variability is observed; some individuals are diagnosed in adulthood, while others require respiratory support and have reduced longevity. MNS in males results in perinatal lethality in all recorded cases. TODPD, seen only in females, is characterized by a skeletal dysplasia that is most prominent in the digits, pigmentary defects of the skin, and recurrent digital fibromata.
Heart and brain malformation syndrome
MedGen UID:
934760
Concept ID:
C4310793
Disease or Syndrome
Heart and brain malformation syndrome (HBMS) is a severe autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by profoundly delayed psychomotor development, dysmorphic facial features, microphthalmia, cardiac malformations, mainly septal defects, and brain malformations, including Dandy-Walker malformation (summary by Shaheen et al., 2016). Homozygous mutation in the SMG9 gene can also cause neurodevelopmental disorder with intention tremor, pyramidal signs, dyspraxia, and ocular anomalies (NEDITPDO; 619995), a less severe neurodevelopmental disorder.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2Y
MedGen UID:
1385152
Concept ID:
C4511482
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive myopathy with rigid spine and distal joint contractures (MRRSDC) is characterized by onset of slowly progressive muscle weakness in the first or second decades of life. There is initial involvement of the proximal lower limbs, followed by distal upper and lower limb muscle weakness and atrophy. Other features include joint contractures, rigid spine, and restricted pulmonary function; some patients may have mild cardiac involvement (summary by Kayman-Kurekci et al., 2014).
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1648310
Concept ID:
C4746851
Disease or Syndrome
This autosomal recessive systemic autoinflammatory disorder is characterized by early childhood onset of annular erythematous plaques on the face and extremities with subsequent development of partial lipodystrophy and laboratory evidence of immune dysregulation. More variable features include recurrent fever, severe joint contractures, muscle weakness and atrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, basal ganglia calcifications, and microcytic anemia (summary by Agarwal et al., 2010; Kitamura et al., 2011; Arima et al., 2011). This disorder encompasses Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome (NKJO); joint contractures, muscular atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP syndrome); and chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature syndrome (CANDLE). Among Japanese patients, this disorder is best described as Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, since both Nakajo (1939) and Nishimura et al. (1950) contributed to the original phenotypic descriptions. Genetic Heterogeneity of Proteasome-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndrome See also PRAAS2 (618048), caused by mutation in the POMP gene (613386) on chromosome 13q12; PRAAS3 (617591), caused by mutation in the PSMB4 gene (602177) on chromosome 1q21; PRAAS4 (619183), caused by mutation in the PSMG2 gene (609702) on chromosome 18p11; and PRAAS5 (619175), caused by mutation in the PSMB10 gene (176847) on chromosome 16q22.
Distal arthrogryposis type 2B1
MedGen UID:
1676961
Concept ID:
C5193014
Disease or Syndrome
Distal arthrogryposis is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by clenched fist, overlapping fingers, camptodactyly, ulnar deviation, and positional foot deformities from birth. It is a disorder of primary limb malformation without primary neurologic or muscle disease. DA1 is not associated with other abnormalities, whereas other forms of DA have additional phenotypic features (Bamshad et al., 1996). The congenital contractures in DA2B (Sheldon-Hall syndrome, SHS) are similar to those observed in DA1, but affected individuals tend to have more prominent nasolabial folds, downslanting palpebral fissures, and a small mouth. DA2B is thought to be the most common of the distal arthrogryposis disorders (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal arthrogryposis, see DA1 (108120).
Blau syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684759
Concept ID:
C5201146
Disease or Syndrome
Blau syndrome is characterized by the triad of granulomatous arthritis, uveitis, and dermatitis. First described in 1985, it was considered to be distinct from sarcoidosis due to the early age of onset and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Published reports of sporadic cases of children with 'early-onset sarcoidosis' (EOS) with granulomatous involvement of different organs, primarily affecting joints, eyes, and skin, were suspected to represent the same disorder because the patients' characteristics were nearly identical. Subsequently, identical NOD2 mutations were identified in patients with Blau syndrome as well as in patients diagnosed with EOS, confirming earlier suspicions that they represented the same disease (summary by Borzutzky et al., 2010). Unlike older children diagnosed with sarcoidosis, these patients have no apparent pulmonary involvement; however, the disease is progressive and may result in severe complications such as blindness and/or joint destruction (Shetty and Gedalia, 1998).
Arthrogryposis, distal, type 1C
MedGen UID:
1722257
Concept ID:
C5436834
Disease or Syndrome
Distal arthrogryposis type 1C (DA1C) is characterized by multiple congenital contractures, scoliosis, and short stature. Contractures involving the proximal joints appear to be more common in MYLPF-associated DA than in other forms of DA, and segmental amyoplasia has been observed (Chong et al., 2020).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and gingival overgrowth
MedGen UID:
1784299
Concept ID:
C5543395
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and gingival overgrowth (NEDSGO) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Some patients have early normal development with developmental regression apparent in the first years of life, whereas others present with hypotonia or delayed development. Most patients develop significant gingival hypertrophy associated with a prominent mandible or cherubism in the first years of life. Other more variable features may include coarse facial features, optic atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, ataxia, and seizures. Brain imaging may show cerebellar or cerebral atrophy and enlarged ventricles. There is a wide phenotypic spectrum with features that may develop with age; the disorder appears to comprise a continuum of evolving neurologic manifestations (Harms et al., 2020).
Martsolf syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1779703
Concept ID:
C5543626
Disease or Syndrome
Martsolf syndrome-2 (MARTS2) is an autosomal recessive disorder with the main features of congenital cataracts, mildly to severely impaired intellectual development, and facial dysmorphism. Other features include brain malformations, microcephaly, and hypogonadism-hypogenitalism (summary by Koparir et al., 2019).
Tessadori-Van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
1804234
Concept ID:
C5677016
Disease or Syndrome
Tessadori-Bicknell-van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome-4 (TEBIVANED4) is characterized by global developmental delay with poor overall growth, variably impaired intellectual development, learning difficulties, distal skeletal anomalies, and dysmorphic facies. Some patients have visual or hearing deficits. The severity and manifestations of the disorder are highly variable (Tessadori et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of TEBIVANED, see TEBIVANED1 (619758).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Corain M, Lando M, Pantaleoni F, Pozza P, Giardini M, Adani R
J Hand Surg Asian Pac Vol 2022 Apr;27(2):233-241. Epub 2022 Mar 31 doi: 10.1142/S2424835522500308. PMID: 35404199
Miranda BH, Talwar C, Horwitz MD, Smith PJ
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2022 Jun;75(6):1907-1915. Epub 2022 Jan 22 doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2022.01.020. PMID: 35153164
Evans BT, Waters PM, Bae DS
J Pediatr Orthop 2017 Jul/Aug;37(5):e317-e320. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0000000000000967. PMID: 28277466

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Corain M, Lando M, Pantaleoni F, Pozza P, Giardini M, Adani R
J Hand Surg Asian Pac Vol 2022 Apr;27(2):233-241. Epub 2022 Mar 31 doi: 10.1142/S2424835522500308. PMID: 35404199
Evans BT, Waters PM, Bae DS
J Pediatr Orthop 2017 Jul/Aug;37(5):e317-e320. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0000000000000967. PMID: 28277466
Hamilton KL, Netscher DT
Plast Reconstr Surg 2015 Mar;135(3):568e-576e. doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000000958. PMID: 25719721
Siegert JJ, Cooney WP, Dobyns JH
J Hand Surg Br 1990 May;15(2):181-9. doi: 10.1016/0266-7681_90_90122-k. PMID: 2366018
Hall JG, Reed SD, Greene G
Am J Med Genet 1982 Feb;11(2):185-239. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.1320110208. PMID: 7039311

Diagnosis

Yannascoli SM, Goldfarb CA
Hand Clin 2018 May;34(2):237-249. doi: 10.1016/j.hcl.2017.12.013. PMID: 29625643
Wijerathne BT, Meier RJ, Agampodi SB
J Med Case Rep 2016 Sep 20;10(1):258. doi: 10.1186/s13256-016-1048-7. PMID: 27650795Free PMC Article
Ty JM, James MA
Hand Clin 2009 May;25(2):195-213. doi: 10.1016/j.hcl.2008.12.003. PMID: 19380060
Tunçbilek E, Alanay Y
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2006 Jun 1;1:20. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-1-20. PMID: 16740166Free PMC Article
Brites MM, Moreno A, Salgado M, Batista AP
Eur J Dermatol 1998 Jul-Aug;8(5):355-6. PMID: 9683871

Therapy

Urban M, Rutowski R, Urban J, Mazurek P, Kuliński S, Gosk J
Adv Clin Exp Med 2014 May-Jun;23(3):399-402. doi: 10.17219/acem/37132. PMID: 24979511
Bernardi P, Graziadio C, Rosa RF, Pfeil JN, Zen PR, Paskulin GA
Sao Paulo Med J 2010;128(2):99-101. doi: 10.1590/s1516-31802010000200011. PMID: 20676578Free PMC Article
Lavi E, Montone KT, Rorke LB, Kliman HJ
Neurology 1991 Sep;41(9):1467-8. doi: 10.1212/wnl.41.9.1467. PMID: 1891100

Prognosis

Hamilton KL, Netscher DT
Plast Reconstr Surg 2015 Mar;135(3):568e-576e. doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000000958. PMID: 25719721
Malik S, Afzal M, Gul S, Wahab A, Ahmad M
Am J Med Genet A 2010 Sep;152A(9):2313-7. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.33552. PMID: 20683984
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Viljoen D
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Hall JG, Reed SD, Greene G
Am J Med Genet 1982 Feb;11(2):185-239. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.1320110208. PMID: 7039311

Clinical prediction guides

Evans BT, Waters PM, Bae DS
J Pediatr Orthop 2017 Jul/Aug;37(5):e317-e320. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0000000000000967. PMID: 28277466
Wijerathne BT, Meier RJ, Agampodi SB
J Med Case Rep 2016 Sep 20;10(1):258. doi: 10.1186/s13256-016-1048-7. PMID: 27650795Free PMC Article
Urban M, Rutowski R, Urban J, Mazurek P, Kuliński S, Gosk J
Adv Clin Exp Med 2014 May-Jun;23(3):399-402. doi: 10.17219/acem/37132. PMID: 24979511
Tunçbilek E, Alanay Y
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2006 Jun 1;1:20. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-1-20. PMID: 16740166Free PMC Article
McFarlane RM, Classen DA, Porte AM, Botz JS
J Hand Surg Am 1992 Jan;17(1):35-44. doi: 10.1016/0363-5023(92)90110-b. PMID: 1538110

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