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Bardet-Biedl syndrome 1(BBS1)

MedGen UID:
422452
Concept ID:
C2936862
Disease or Syndrome
Synonym: BBS1
 
Genes (locations): ARL6 (3q11.2); BBS1 (11q13.2); CCDC28B (1p35.2)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0008854
OMIM®: 209900

Definition

Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, kidney dysfunction, polydactyly, behavioral dysfunction, and hypogonadism (summary by Beales et al., 1999). Eight proteins implicated in the disorder assemble to form the BBSome, a stable complex involved in signaling receptor trafficking to and from cilia (summary by Scheidecker et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome BBS2 (615981) is caused by mutation in a gene on 16q13 (606151); BBS3 (600151), by mutation in the ARL6 gene on 3q11 (608845); BBS4 (615982), by mutation in a gene on 15q22 (600374); BBS5 (615983), by mutation in a gene on 2q31 (603650); BBS6 (605231), by mutation in the MKKS gene on 20p12 (604896); BBS7 (615984), by mutation in a gene on 4q27 (607590); BBS8 (615985), by mutation in the TTC8 gene on 14q32 (608132); BBS9 (615986), by mutation in a gene on 7p14 (607968); BBS10 (615987), by mutation in a gene on 12q21 (610148); BBS11 (615988), by mutation in the TRIM32 gene on 9q33 (602290); BBS12 (615989), by mutation in a gene on 4q27 (610683); BBS13 (615990), by mutation in the MKS1 gene (609883) on 17q23; BBS14 (615991), by mutation in the CEP290 gene (610142) on 12q21, BBS15 (615992), by mutation in the WDPCP gene (613580) on 2p15; BBS16 (615993), by mutation in the SDCCAG8 gene (613524) on 1q43; BBS17 (615994), by mutation in the LZTFL1 gene (606568) on 3p21; BBS18 (615995), by mutation in the BBIP1 gene (613605) on 10q25; BBS19 (615996), by mutation in the IFT27 gene (615870) on 22q12; BBS20 (619471), by mutation in the IFT172 gene (607386) on 9p21; BBS21 (617406), by mutation in the CFAP418 gene (614477) on 8q22; and BBS22 (617119), by mutation in the IFT74 gene (608040) on 9p21. The CCDC28B gene (610162) modifies the expression of BBS phenotypes in patients who have mutations in other genes. Mutations in MKS1, MKS3 (TMEM67; 609884), and C2ORF86 also modify the expression of BBS phenotypes in patients who have mutations in other genes. Although BBS had originally been thought to be a recessive disorder, Katsanis et al. (2001) demonstrated that clinical manifestation of some forms of Bardet-Biedl syndrome requires recessive mutations in 1 of the 6 loci plus an additional mutation in a second locus. While Katsanis et al. (2001) called this 'triallelic inheritance,' Burghes et al. (2001) suggested the term 'recessive inheritance with a modifier of penetrance.' Mykytyn et al. (2002) found no evidence of involvement of the common BBS1 mutation in triallelic inheritance. However, Fan et al. (2004) found heterozygosity in a mutation of the BBS3 gene (608845.0002) as an apparent modifier of the expression of homozygosity of the met390-to-arg mutation in the BBS1 gene (209901.0001). Allelic disorders include nonsyndromic forms of retinitis pigmentosa: RP51 (613464), caused by TTC8 mutation, and RP55 (613575), caused by ARL6 mutation. [from OMIM]

Clinical features

From HPO
Decreased testicular size
MedGen UID:
66027
Concept ID:
C0241355
Finding
Reduced volume of the testicle (the male gonad).
Abnormality of the kidney
MedGen UID:
78593
Concept ID:
C0266292
Congenital Abnormality
An abnormality of the kidney.
Vaginal atresia
MedGen UID:
232948
Concept ID:
C1321884
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital occlusion of the vagina or adhesion of the walls of the vagina causing occlusion.
Abnormality of the ovary
MedGen UID:
892314
Concept ID:
C4021818
Anatomical Abnormality
An abnormality of the ovary.
Micropenis
MedGen UID:
1633603
Concept ID:
C4551492
Congenital Abnormality
Abnormally small penis. At birth, the normal penis is about 3 cm (stretched length from pubic tubercle to tip of penis) with micropenis less than 2.0-2.5 cm.
Syndactyly
MedGen UID:
52619
Concept ID:
C0039075
Congenital Abnormality
Webbing or fusion of the fingers or toes, involving soft parts only or including bone structure. Bony fusions are referred to as "bony" syndactyly if the fusion occurs in a radio-ulnar axis. Fusions of bones of the fingers or toes in a proximo-distal axis are referred to as "symphalangism".
Foot polydactyly
MedGen UID:
510637
Concept ID:
C0158734
Congenital Abnormality
A kind of polydactyly characterized by the presence of a supernumerary toe or toes.
Postaxial polydactyly
MedGen UID:
67394
Concept ID:
C0220697
Disease or Syndrome
Polydactyly refers to the occurrence of supernumerary digits and is the most frequent of congenital hand and foot deformities. Based on the location of the extra digits, polydactyly can be classified into preaxial, involving the thumb or great toe; postaxial, affecting the fifth digit; and central, involving the 3 central digits. Postaxial polydactyly (PAP) is further subclassified into 2 types: in type A, a well-formed extra digit articulates with the fifth or a sixth metacarpal, whereas in type B, a rudimentary, poorly developed extra digit is present (summary by Umm-e-Kalsoom et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Postaxial Polydactyly Other forms of postaxial polydactyly type A include PAPA2 (602085) on chromosome 13q21; PAPA3 (607324) on chromosome 19p13; PAPA4 (608562) on chromosome 7q22; PAPA5 (263450) on chromosome 13q13; PAPA6 (615226), caused by mutation in the ZNF141 gene (194648) on chromosome 4p16; PAPA7 (617642), caused by mutation in the IQCE gene (617631) on chromosome 7p22; PAPA8 (618123), caused by mutation in the GLI1 gene (165220) on chromosome 12q13; PAPA9 (618219), caused by mutation in the FAM98A gene (617273) on chromosome 8q22; and PAPA10 (618498), caused by mutation in the KIAA0825 gene (617266) on chromosome 5q15.
Brachydactyly
MedGen UID:
67454
Concept ID:
C0221357
Congenital Abnormality
Digits that appear disproportionately short compared to the hand/foot. The word brachydactyly is used here to describe a series distinct patterns of shortened digits (brachydactyly types A-E). This is the sense used here.
Postaxial hand polydactyly
MedGen UID:
609221
Concept ID:
C0431904
Congenital Abnormality
Supernumerary digits located at the ulnar side of the hand (that is, on the side with the fifth finger).
Radial deviation of finger
MedGen UID:
322852
Concept ID:
C1836189
Finding
Bending or curvature of a finger toward the radial side (i.e., towards the thumb). The deviation is at the metacarpal-phalangeal joint, and this finding is distinct from clinodactyly.
Short foot
MedGen UID:
376415
Concept ID:
C1848673
Finding
A measured foot length that is more than 2 SD below the mean for a newborn of 27 - 41 weeks gestation, or foot that is less than the 3rd centile for individuals from birth to 16 years of age (objective). Alternatively, a foot that appears disproportionately short (subjective).
Broad foot
MedGen UID:
356187
Concept ID:
C1866241
Finding
A foot for which the measured width is above the 95th centile for age; or, a foot that appears disproportionately wide for its length.
Postaxial foot polydactyly
MedGen UID:
384489
Concept ID:
C2112129
Finding
Polydactyly of the foot most commonly refers to the presence of six toes on one foot. Postaxial polydactyly affects the lateral ray and the duplication may range from a well-formed articulated digit to a rudimentary digit.
Hypertensive disorder
MedGen UID:
6969
Concept ID:
C0020538
Disease or Syndrome
The presence of chronic increased pressure in the systemic arterial system.
Left ventricular hypertrophy
MedGen UID:
57442
Concept ID:
C0149721
Disease or Syndrome
Enlargement or increased size of the heart left ventricle.
Obesity
MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
Accumulation of substantial excess body fat.
Abdominal obesity
MedGen UID:
90229
Concept ID:
C0311277
Finding
Excessive fat around the stomach and abdomen.
Truncal obesity
MedGen UID:
1637490
Concept ID:
C4551560
Finding
Obesity located preferentially in the trunk of the body as opposed to the extremities.
Hepatic fibrosis
MedGen UID:
116093
Concept ID:
C0239946
Disease or Syndrome
The presence of excessive fibrous connective tissue in the liver. Fibrosis is a reparative or reactive process.
Biliary tract abnormality
MedGen UID:
108201
Concept ID:
C0549613
Finding
An abnormality of the biliary tree.
Hearing impairment
MedGen UID:
235586
Concept ID:
C1384666
Disease or Syndrome
A decreased magnitude of the sensory perception of sound.
Cerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
849
Concept ID:
C0007758
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar ataxia refers to ataxia due to dysfunction of the cerebellum. This causes a variety of elementary neurological deficits including asynergy (lack of coordination between muscles, limbs and joints), dysmetria (lack of ability to judge distances that can lead to under- or overshoot in grasping movements), and dysdiadochokinesia (inability to perform rapid movements requiring antagonizing muscle groups to be switched on and off repeatedly).
Aganglionic megacolon
MedGen UID:
5559
Concept ID:
C0019569
Disease or Syndrome
The disorder described by Hirschsprung (1888) and known as Hirschsprung disease or aganglionic megacolon is characterized by congenital absence of intrinsic ganglion cells in the myenteric (Auerbach) and submucosal (Meissner) plexuses of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients are diagnosed with the short-segment form (S-HSCR, approximately 80% of cases) when the aganglionic segment does not extend beyond the upper sigmoid, and with the long-segment form (L-HSCR) when aganglionosis extends proximal to the sigmoid (Amiel et al., 2008). Total colonic aganglionosis and total intestinal HSCR also occur. Genetic Heterogeneity of Hirschsprung Disease Several additional loci for isolated Hirschsprung disease have been mapped. HSCR2 (600155) is associated with variation in the EDNRB gene (131244) on 13q22; HSCR3 (613711) is associated with variation in the GDNF gene (600837) on 5p13; HSCR4 (613712) is associated with variation in the EDN3 gene (131242) on 20q13; HSCR5 (600156) maps to 9q31; HSCR6 (606874) maps to 3p21; HSCR7 (606875) maps to 19q12; HSCR8 (608462) maps to 16q23; and HSCR9 (611644) maps to 4q31-q32. HSCR also occurs as a feature of several syndromes including the Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (277580), Mowat-Wilson syndrome (235730), Goldberg-Shprintzen syndrome (609460), and congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS; 209880). Whereas mendelian modes of inheritance have been described for syndromic HSCR, isolated HSCR stands as a model for genetic disorders with complex patterns of inheritance. Isolated HSCR appears to be of complex nonmendelian inheritance with low sex-dependent penetrance and variable expression according to the length of the aganglionic segment, suggestive of the involvement of one or more genes with low penetrance. The development of surgical procedures decreased mortality and morbidity, which allowed the emergence of familial cases. HSCR occurs as an isolated trait in 70% of patients, is associated with chromosomal anomaly in 12% of cases, and occurs with additional congenital anomalies in 18% of cases (summary by Amiel et al., 2008).
Abnormality of speech or vocalization
MedGen UID:
11531
Concept ID:
C0037822
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormalities in the sound of a person's speech or vocalization are not necessarily associated with a known physical cause or due to stuttering or stammering.
Delayed speech and language development
MedGen UID:
105318
Concept ID:
C0454644
Finding
A degree of language development that is significantly below the norm for a child of a specified age.
Global developmental delay
MedGen UID:
107838
Concept ID:
C0557874
Finding
A delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child, including motor skills, speech and language, cognitive skills, and social and emotional skills. This term should only be used to describe children younger than five years of age.
Poor coordination
MedGen UID:
107874
Concept ID:
C0563243
Finding
Gait imbalance
MedGen UID:
373028
Concept ID:
C1836150
Finding
Intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
811461
Concept ID:
C3714756
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, is characterized by subnormal intellectual functioning that occurs during the developmental period. It is defined by an IQ score below 70.
Specific learning disability
MedGen UID:
871302
Concept ID:
C4025790
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Impairment of certain skills such as reading or writing, coordination, self-control, or attention that interfere with the ability to learn. The impairment is not related to a global deficiency of intelligence.
Macrocephaly
MedGen UID:
745757
Concept ID:
C2243051
Finding
Occipitofrontal (head) circumference greater than 97th centile compared to appropriate, age matched, sex-matched normal standards. Alternatively, a apparently increased size of the cranium.
Asthma
MedGen UID:
2109
Concept ID:
C0004096
Disease or Syndrome
Asthma is characterized by increased responsiveness of the tracheobronchial tree to multiple stimuli, leading to narrowing of the air passages with resultant dyspnea, cough, and wheezing.
Allergy
MedGen UID:
9370
Concept ID:
C0020517
Pathologic Function
An allergy is an immune response or reaction to substances that are usually not harmful.
Diabetes mellitus
MedGen UID:
8350
Concept ID:
C0011849
Disease or Syndrome
A group of abnormalities characterized by hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance.
Insulin resistance
MedGen UID:
43904
Concept ID:
C0021655
Pathologic Function
Increased resistance towards insulin, that is, diminished effectiveness of insulin in reducing blood glucose levels.
Partial congenital absence of teeth
MedGen UID:
43794
Concept ID:
C0020608
Congenital Abnormality
Tooth agenesis in some form is a common human anomaly that affects approximately 20% of the population. Although tooth agenesis is associated with numerous syndromes, several case reports describe nonsyndromic forms that are either sporadic or familial in nature, as reviewed by Gorlin et al. (1990). The incidence of familial tooth agenesis varies with each class of teeth. Most commonly affected are third molars (wisdom teeth), followed by either upper lateral incisors or lower second premolars; agenesis involving first and second molars is very rare. Also see 114600 and 302400. Selective tooth agenesis without associated systemic disorders has sometimes been divided into 2 types: oligodontia, defined as agenesis of 6 or more permanent teeth, and hypodontia, defined as agenesis of less than 6 teeth. The number in both cases does not include absence of third molars (wisdom teeth). Faulty use of the terms, however, have confounded their use. The term 'partial anodontia' is obsolete (Salinas, 1978). Genetic Heterogeneity of Selective Tooth Agenesis Other forms of selective tooth agenesis include STHAG2 (602639), mapped to chromosome 16q12; STHAG3 (604625), caused by mutation in the PAX9 gene (167416) on chromosome 14q12; STHAG4 (150400), caused by mutation in the WNT10A gene (606268) on chromosome 2q35; STHAG5 (610926), mapped to chromosome 10q11; STHAG7 (616724), caused by mutation in the LRP6 gene (603507) on chromosome 12p13; STHAG8 (617073), caused by mutation in the WNT10B gene (601906) on chromosome 12q13; STHAG9 (617275), caused by mutation in the GREM2 gene (608832) on chromosome 1q43; STHAG10 (620173), caused by mutation in the TSPEAR gene (612920) on chromosome 21q22; and STHAGX1 (313500), caused by mutation in the EDA gene (300451) on chromosome Xq13. A type of selective tooth agenesis that was formerly designated STHAG6 has been incorporated into the dental anomalies and short stature syndrome (DASS; 601216). Of 34 unrelated patients with nonsyndromic tooth agenesis, van den Boogaard et al. (2012) found that 56% (19 patients) had mutations in the WNT10A gene (STHAG4), whereas only 3% and 9% had mutations in the MSX1 (STHAG1) and PAX9 (STHAG3) genes, respectively. The authors concluded that WNT10A is a major gene in the etiology of isolated hypodontia. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations Yu et al. (2016) observed that the most frequently missing permanent teeth in WNT10B-associated oligodontia were the lateral incisors (83.3%), whereas premolars were missing only 51.4% of the time, which they noted was a pattern 'clearly different' from the oligodontia patterns resulting from WNT10A mutations. They also stated that the selective pattern in WNT10B mutants was different from that associated with mutations in other genes, such as MSX1, in which second premolars are missing, and PAX9, in which there is agenesis of molars.
Dental crowding
MedGen UID:
11850
Concept ID:
C0040433
Finding
Changes in alignment of teeth in the dental arch
High palate
MedGen UID:
66814
Concept ID:
C0240635
Congenital Abnormality
Height of the palate more than 2 SD above the mean (objective) or palatal height at the level of the first permanent molar more than twice the height of the teeth (subjective).
High, narrow palate
MedGen UID:
324787
Concept ID:
C1837404
Finding
The presence of a high and narrow palate.
Hirsutism
MedGen UID:
42461
Concept ID:
C0019572
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormally increased hair growth referring to a male pattern of body hair (androgenic hair).
Hypogonadism
MedGen UID:
5711
Concept ID:
C0020619
Disease or Syndrome
A decreased functionality of the gonad.
Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus
MedGen UID:
57876
Concept ID:
C0162283
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by inability to concentrate the urine, which results in polyuria (excessive urine production) and polydipsia (excessive thirst). Affected untreated infants usually have poor feeding and failure to thrive, and rapid onset of severe dehydration with illness, hot environment, or the withholding of water. Short stature and secondary dilatation of the ureters and bladder from the high urine volume is common in untreated individuals.
Astigmatism
MedGen UID:
2473
Concept ID:
C0004106
Disease or Syndrome
Astigmatism (from the Greek 'a' meaning absence and 'stigma' meaning point) is a condition in which the parallel rays of light entering the eye through the refractive media are not focused on a single point. Both corneal and noncorneal factors contribute to refractive astigmatism. Corneal astigmatism is mainly the result of an aspheric anterior surface of the cornea, which can be measured readily by means of a keratometer; in a small fraction of cases (approximately 1 in 10) the effect is neutralized by the back surface. The curvature of the back surface of the cornea is not considered in most studies, because it is more difficult to measure; moreover, in the case of severe corneal astigmatism, there is evidence that both surfaces have the same configuration. Noncorneal factors are errors in the curvature of the 2 surfaces of the crystalline lens, irregularity in the refractive index of the lens, and an eccentric lens position. Since the cornea is the dominant component of the eye's refracting system, a highly astigmatic cornea is likely to result in a similarly astigmatic ocular refraction (summary by Clementi et al., 1998).
Glaucoma
MedGen UID:
42224
Concept ID:
C0017601
Disease or Syndrome
Glaucoma refers loss of retinal ganglion cells in a characteristic pattern of optic neuropathy usually associated with increased intraocular pressure.
Myopia
MedGen UID:
44558
Concept ID:
C0027092
Disease or Syndrome
Nearsightedness, also known as myopia, is an eye condition that causes blurry distance vision. People who are nearsighted have more trouble seeing things that are far away (such as when driving) than things that are close up (such as when reading or using a computer). If it is not treated with corrective lenses or surgery, nearsightedness can lead to squinting, eyestrain, headaches, and significant visual impairment.\n\nNearsightedness usually begins in childhood or adolescence. It tends to worsen with age until adulthood, when it may stop getting worse (stabilize). In some people, nearsightedness improves in later adulthood.\n\nFor normal vision, light passes through the clear cornea at the front of the eye and is focused by the lens onto the surface of the retina, which is the lining of the back of the eye that contains light-sensing cells. People who are nearsighted typically have eyeballs that are too long from front to back. As a result, light entering the eye is focused too far forward, in front of the retina instead of on its surface. It is this change that causes distant objects to appear blurry. The longer the eyeball is, the farther forward light rays will be focused and the more severely nearsighted a person will be.\n\nNearsightedness is measured by how powerful a lens must be to correct it. The standard unit of lens power is called a diopter. Negative (minus) powered lenses are used to correct nearsightedness. The more severe a person's nearsightedness, the larger the number of diopters required for correction. In an individual with nearsightedness, one eye may be more nearsighted than the other.\n\nEye doctors often refer to nearsightedness less than -5 or -6 diopters as "common myopia." Nearsightedness of -6 diopters or more is commonly called "high myopia." This distinction is important because high myopia increases a person's risk of developing other eye problems that can lead to permanent vision loss or blindness. These problems include tearing and detachment of the retina, clouding of the lens (cataract), and an eye disease called glaucoma that is usually related to increased pressure within the eye. The risk of these other eye problems increases with the severity of the nearsightedness. The term "pathological myopia" is used to describe cases in which high myopia leads to tissue damage within the eye.
Nyctalopia
MedGen UID:
10349
Concept ID:
C0028077
Disease or Syndrome
Inability to see well at night or in poor light.
Nystagmus
MedGen UID:
45166
Concept ID:
C0028738
Disease or Syndrome
Rhythmic, involuntary oscillations of one or both eyes related to abnormality in fixation, conjugate gaze, or vestibular mechanisms.
Retinal degeneration
MedGen UID:
48432
Concept ID:
C0035304
Finding
A nonspecific term denoting degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium and/or retinal photoreceptor cells.
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
A misalignment of the eyes so that the visual axes deviate from bifoveal fixation. The classification of strabismus may be based on a number of features including the relative position of the eyes, whether the deviation is latent or manifest, intermittent or constant, concomitant or otherwise and according to the age of onset and the relevance of any associated refractive error.
Cataract
MedGen UID:
39462
Concept ID:
C0086543
Disease or Syndrome
A cataract is an opacity or clouding that develops in the crystalline lens of the eye or in its capsule.
Reduced visual acuity
MedGen UID:
65889
Concept ID:
C0234632
Finding
Diminished clarity of vision.
Peripheral visual field loss
MedGen UID:
116124
Concept ID:
C0241688
Finding
Loss of peripheral vision with retention of central vision, resulting in a constricted circular tunnel-like field of vision.
Retinal dystrophy
MedGen UID:
208903
Concept ID:
C0854723
Finding
Retinal dystrophy is an abnormality of the retina associated with a hereditary process. Retinal dystrophies are defined by their predominantly monogenic inheritance and they are frequently associated with loss or dysfunction of photoreceptor cells as a primary or secondary event.
Bone spicule pigmentation of the retina
MedGen UID:
323029
Concept ID:
C1836926
Finding
Pigment migration into the retina in a bone-spicule configuration (resembling the nucleated cells within the lacuna of bone).
Attenuation of retinal blood vessels
MedGen UID:
480605
Concept ID:
C3278975
Finding
Hyperautofluorescent macular lesion
MedGen UID:
893119
Concept ID:
C4073101
Finding
Increased amount of autofluorescence in the macula as ascertained by fundus autofluorescence imaging.
Rod-cone dystrophy
MedGen UID:
1632921
Concept ID:
C4551714
Disease or Syndrome
An inherited retinal disease subtype in which the rod photoreceptors appear to be more severely affected than the cone photoreceptors. Typical presentation is with nyctalopia (due to rod dysfunction) followed by loss of mid-peripheral field of vision, which gradually extends and leaves many patients with a small central island of vision due to the preservation of macular cones.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Morr AK, Mosimann B, Tschumi S, Surbek D, Raio L
Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol 2022 Apr;226(2):98-103. Epub 2021 Sep 7 doi: 10.1055/a-1586-5493. PMID: 34492706
Fan Y, Rahman P, Peddle L, Hefferton D, Gladney N, Moore SJ, Green JS, Parfrey PS, Davidson WS
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 2004 May;28(5):680-4. doi: 10.1038/sj.ijo.0802601. PMID: 14993910

Curated

Slavotinek A, Beales P
Eur J Hum Genet 2011 Mar;19(3) Epub 2010 Dec 8 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2010.199. PMID: 21150877Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Belanger Deloge R, Zhao X, Luna PN, Shaw CA, Rosenfeld JA, Scott DA
Eur J Hum Genet 2023 Mar;31(3):296-303. Epub 2022 Dec 6 doi: 10.1038/s41431-022-01255-y. PMID: 36474027Free PMC Article
Reinehr T, Hinney A, de Sousa G, Austrup F, Hebebrand J, Andler W
J Pediatr 2007 Jun;150(6):618-22, 622.e1-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2007.01.042. PMID: 17517246
Haider NB, Searby C, Galperin E, Mintz L, Horowitz M, Stone EM, Sheffield VC
Gene 1999 Nov 15;240(1):227-32. doi: 10.1016/s0378-1119(99)00395-9. PMID: 10564830

Diagnosis

Guo DF, Williams PA, Laule C, Seaby C, Zhang Q, Sheffield VC, Rahmouni K
Function (Oxf) 2024;5(1):zqad070. Epub 2023 Dec 23 doi: 10.1093/function/zqad070. PMID: 38223458Free PMC Article
Rouabhi Y, Guo DF, Zhao Y, Rahmouni K
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 2023 Dec 1;325(6):E711-E722. Epub 2023 Nov 1 doi: 10.1152/ajpendo.00174.2023. PMID: 37909854Free PMC Article
Belanger Deloge R, Zhao X, Luna PN, Shaw CA, Rosenfeld JA, Scott DA
Eur J Hum Genet 2023 Mar;31(3):296-303. Epub 2022 Dec 6 doi: 10.1038/s41431-022-01255-y. PMID: 36474027Free PMC Article
Fadaie Z, Whelan L, Dockery A, Li CHZ, van den Born LI, Hoyng CB, Gilissen C, Corominas J, Rowlands C, Megaw R, Lampe AK, Cremers FPM, Farrar GJ, Ellingford JM, Kenna PF, Roosing S
J Med Genet 2022 May;59(5):438-444. Epub 2021 Apr 28 doi: 10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-107626. PMID: 33910932
Kim MS, Joo K, Seong MW, Kim MJ, Park KH, Park SS, Woo SJ
J Korean Med Sci 2019 Jun 2;34(21):e161. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2019.34.e161. PMID: 31144483Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Fan Y, Green JS, Ross AJ, Beales PL, Parfrey PS, Davidson WS
Hum Genet 2005 Jan;116(1-2):62-71. Epub 2004 Oct 23 doi: 10.1007/s00439-004-1184-9. PMID: 15517396

Clinical prediction guides

Michelen-Gómez E, Guardiola-Dávila G, Izquierdo NJ
P R Health Sci J 2021 Sep;40(3):151-154. PMID: 34792930
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