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Congenital diaphragmatic hernia(CDH; HCD)

MedGen UID:
68625
Concept ID:
C0235833
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: Agenesis of hemidiaphragm; Congenital diaphragmatic defect; DIH; Unilateral agenesis of diaphragm
SNOMED CT: CDH - Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (17190001); Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (17190001)
Modes of inheritance:
Non-Mendelian inheritance
MedGen UID:
109109
Concept ID:
C0600599
Genetic Function
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that depends on genetic determinants in more than one gene.
Not genetically inherited
MedGen UID:
988794
Concept ID:
CN307044
Finding
Source: Orphanet
clinical entity without genetic inheritance.
 
Related genes: ZFPM2, PLS3
 
HPO: HP:0000776
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0005711
OMIM®: 142340
OMIM® Phenotypic series: PS142340
Orphanet: ORPHA2140

Definition

The presence of a hernia of the diaphragm present at birth. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Focal dermal hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
42055
Concept ID:
C0016395
Disease or Syndrome
Focal dermal hypoplasia is a multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. Skin manifestations present at birth include atrophic and hypoplastic areas of skin; cutis aplasia; fat nodules in the dermis manifesting as soft, yellow-pink cutaneous nodules; and pigmentary changes. Verrucoid papillomas of the skin and mucous membranes may appear later. The nails can be ridged, dysplastic, or hypoplastic; hair can be sparse or absent. Limb malformations include oligo-/syndactyly and split hand/foot. Developmental abnormalities of the eye can include anophthalmia/microphthalmia, iris and chorioretinal coloboma, and lacrimal duct abnormalities. Craniofacial findings can include facial asymmetry, notched alae nasi, cleft lip and palate, and pointed chin. Occasional findings include dental anomalies, abdominal wall defects, diaphragmatic hernia, and renal anomalies. Psychomotor development is usually normal; some individuals have cognitive impairment.
Craniofrontonasal syndrome
MedGen UID:
65095
Concept ID:
C0220767
Disease or Syndrome
Craniofrontonasal syndrome is an X-linked developmental disorder that shows paradoxically greater severity in heterozygous females than in hemizygous males. Females have frontonasal dysplasia, craniofacial asymmetry, craniosynostosis, bifid nasal tip, grooved nails, wiry hair, and abnormalities of the thoracic skeleton, whereas males typically show only hypertelorism (Twigg et al., 2004; Wieland et al., 2004).
Nager syndrome
MedGen UID:
120519
Concept ID:
C0265245
Disease or Syndrome
Nager syndrome is the prototype for a group of disorders collectively referred to as the acrofacial dysostoses (AFDs), which are characterized by malformation of the craniofacial skeleton and the limbs. The major facial features of Nager syndrome include downslanted palpebral fissures, midface retrusion, and micrognathia, the latter of which often requires the placement of a tracheostomy in early childhood. Limb defects typically involve the anterior (radial) elements of the upper limbs and manifest as small or absent thumbs, triphalangeal thumbs, radial hypoplasia or aplasia, and radioulnar synostosis. Phocomelia of the upper limbs and, occasionally, lower-limb defects have also been reported. The presence of anterior upper-limb defects and the typical lack of lower-limb involvement distinguishes Nager syndrome from Miller syndrome (263750), another rare AFD; however, distinguishing Nager syndrome from other AFDs, including Miller syndrome, can be challenging (summary by Bernier et al., 2012).
Autosomal recessive multiple pterygium syndrome
MedGen UID:
82696
Concept ID:
C0265261
Congenital Abnormality
Multiple pterygium syndromes comprise a group of multiple congenital anomaly disorders characterized by webbing (pterygia) of the neck, elbows, and/or knees and joint contractures (arthrogryposis) (Morgan et al., 2006). The multiple pterygium syndromes are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous but are traditionally divided into prenatally lethal (253290) and nonlethal (Escobar) types.
Pallister-Killian syndrome
MedGen UID:
120540
Concept ID:
C0265449
Disease or Syndrome
Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a dysmorphic condition involving most organ systems, but is also characterized by a tissue-limited mosaicism; most fibroblasts have 47 chromosomes with an extra small metacentric chromosome, whereas the karyotype of lymphocytes is normal. The extra metacentric chromosome is an isochromosome for part of the short arm of chromosome 12: i(12)(p10) (Peltomaki et al., 1987; Warburton et al., 1987).
Cutis laxa, autosomal recessive, type 1A
MedGen UID:
78663
Concept ID:
C0268351
Disease or Syndrome
FBLN5-related cutis laxa is characterized by cutis laxa, early childhood-onset pulmonary emphysema, peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, and other evidence of a generalized connective disorder such as inguinal hernias and hollow viscus diverticula (e.g., intestine, bladder). Occasionally, supravalvar aortic stenosis is observed. Intrafamilial variability in age of onset is observed. Cardiorespiratory failure from complications of pulmonary emphysema (respiratory or cardiac insufficiency) is the most common cause of death.
Cutis laxa - Marfanoid syndrome
MedGen UID:
96594
Concept ID:
C0432335
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, developmental defect with connective tissue involvement syndrome characterized by neonatal cutis laxa, marfanoid habitus with arachnodactyly, pulmonary emphysema, cardiac anomalies, and diaphragmatic hernia. Mild contractures of the elbows, hips, and knees, with bilateral hip dislocation may also be associated. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1991.
Pentalogy of Cantrell
MedGen UID:
107540
Concept ID:
C0559483
Disease or Syndrome
Pentalogy of Cantrell (POC) is a lethal multiple congenital anomalies syndrome, characterized by the presence of 5 major malformations: midline supraumbilical abdominal wall defect, lower sternal defect, diaphragmatic pericardial defect, anterior diaphragmatic defect and various intracardiac malformations. Ectopia cordis (EC) is often found in fetuses with POC.
Linear skin defects with multiple congenital anomalies 1
MedGen UID:
163210
Concept ID:
C0796070
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia and/or anophthalmia and linear skin defects, usually involving the face and neck, which are present at birth and heal with age, leaving minimal residual scarring. Other findings can include a wide variety of other ocular abnormalities (e.g., corneal anomalies, orbital cysts, cataracts), central nervous system involvement (e.g., structural anomalies, developmental delay, infantile seizures), cardiac concerns (e.g., hypertrophic or oncocytic cardiomyopathy, atrial or ventricular septal defects, arrhythmias), short stature, diaphragmatic hernia, nail dystrophy, hearing impairment, and genitourinary malformations. Inter- and intrafamilial variability is described.
Perlman syndrome
MedGen UID:
162909
Concept ID:
C0796113
Disease or Syndrome
Perlman syndrome (PRLMNS) is an autosomal recessive congenital overgrowth syndrome with similarities to Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS; 130650). Affected children are large at birth, are hypotonic, and show organomegaly, characteristic facial dysmorphisms (inverted V-shaped upper lip, prominent forehead, deep-set eyes, broad and flat nasal bridge, and low-set ears), renal anomalies (nephromegaly and hydronephrosis), frequent neurodevelopmental delay, and high neonatal mortality. Perlman syndrome is associated with a high risk of Wilms tumor, with a 64% incidence in infants surviving beyond the neonatal period. The tumor is diagnosed at an earlier age in these individuals compared with sporadic cases (less than 2 years and 3-4 years of age, respectively), and there is a high frequency of bilateral tumors (55%). Histologic examination of the kidneys in children with Perlman syndrome shows frequent nephroblastomatosis, which is a precursor lesion for Wilms tumor (summary by Astuti et al., 2012).
Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
162917
Concept ID:
C0796154
Disease or Syndrome
Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1 (SGBS1) is characterized by pre- and postnatal macrosomia; distinctive craniofacial features (including macrocephaly, coarse facial features, macrostomia, macroglossia, and palatal abnormalities); and commonly, mild-to-severe intellectual disability with or without structural brain anomalies. Other variable findings include supernumerary nipples, diastasis recti / umbilical hernia, congenital heart defects, diaphragmatic hernia, genitourinary defects, and gastrointestinal anomalies. Skeletal anomalies can include vertebral fusion, scoliosis, rib anomalies, and congenital hip dislocation. Hand anomalies can include large hands and postaxial polydactyly. Affected individuals are at increased risk for embryonal tumors including Wilms tumor, hepatoblastoma, adrenal neuroblastoma, gonadoblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and medulloblastoma.
Drash syndrome
MedGen UID:
181980
Concept ID:
C0950121
Disease or Syndrome
WT1 disorder is characterized by congenital/infantile or childhood onset of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), a progressive glomerulopathy that does not respond to standard steroid therapy. Additional common findings can include disorders of testicular development (with or without abnormalities of the external genitalia and/or müllerian structures) and Wilms tumor. Less common findings are congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and gonadoblastoma. While various combinations of renal and other findings associated with a WT1 pathogenic variant were designated as certain syndromes in the past, those designations are now recognized to be part of a phenotypic continuum and are no longer clinically helpful.
Matthew-Wood syndrome
MedGen UID:
318679
Concept ID:
C1832661
Disease or Syndrome
Syndromic microphthalmia-9, also referred to as pulmonary hypoplasia-diaphragmatic hernia-anophthalmia-cardiac defect, is characterized by bilateral clinical anophthalmia, pulmonary hypoplasia/aplasia, cardiac malformations, and diaphragmatic defects. The phenotype is variable, ranging from isolated clinical anophthalmia or microphthalmia to complex presentations involving the cardiac, pulmonary, diaphragmatic, and renal systems. At its most severe, infants are born without pulmonary structures and die soon after birth (Marcadier et al., 2015).
Diaphragmatic defect-limb deficiency-skull defect syndrome
MedGen UID:
371377
Concept ID:
C1832668
Disease or Syndrome
Diaphragmatic defect-limb deficiency-skull defect syndrome is characterized by the association of classical diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) with severe lung hypoplasia, and variable associated malformations.
Emanuel syndrome
MedGen UID:
323030
Concept ID:
C1836929
Disease or Syndrome
Emanuel syndrome is characterized by pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, microcephaly, hypotonia, severe developmental delays, ear anomalies, preauricular tags or pits, cleft or high-arched palate, congenital heart defects, kidney abnormalities, and genital abnormalities in males.
Diaphragmatic hernia 1
MedGen UID:
327154
Concept ID:
C1840643
Anatomical Abnormality
Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) refers to a group of congenital defects in the structural integrity of the diaphragm which are often associated with lethal pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. Prevalence in newborns ranges from 1 in 2,500 to 1 in 4,000, and there is a 30 to 60% mortality rate (Langham et al., 1996; Harrison et al., 1994; Nobuhara et al., 1996). Most cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia are sporadic. Genetic Heterogeneity of Diaphragmatic Hernia Congenital diaphragmatic hernia-1 (DIH1) maps to chromosome 15q26. Also see DIH2 (222400), which maps to chromosome 8p23; DIH3 (610187), caused by mutation in the ZFPM2 gene (603693) on chromosome 8q23; DIH4 (620025), caused by mutation in the ALDH1A2 gene (603687) on chromosome 15q21; and DIH5 (306950), caused by mutation in the PLS3 gene (300131) on chromosome Xq23. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia can also present with other congenital anomalies. Fryns syndrome (229850) may be the most common autosomal recessive syndrome with DIH as a cardinal feature (Slavotinek et al., 2005). See also thoracoabdominal syndrome (THAS; 313850), which maps to chromosome Xq25-q26. Holder et al. (2007) reviewed the genetic factors in congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Pober (2008) reviewed genetic aspects of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, with emphasis on various syndromes in which CDH occurs along with other manifestations.
Hernia, anterior diaphragmatic
MedGen UID:
334881
Concept ID:
C1844025
Anatomical Abnormality
Diaphragmatic hernia-5 (DIH5) is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), diaphragmatic agenesis, and abdominal wall defects. The disorder is usually transmitted in an X-linked recessive pattern with males being severely affected; many die in early childhood. Although the diaphragmatic features are variable, posterolateral diaphragmatic defects are common. Additional features include hypertelorism, sometimes with more severe dysmorphic facial features, and some affected males may show genitourinary, cardiac, pulmonary, or neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Most carrier females show hypertelorism, although a few have mild abdominal wall defects. Some of the features of DIH5 overlap with those of the X-linked disorder thoracoabdominal syndrome (THAS; 313850) (Petit et al., 2023). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), see DIH1 (142340).
Gillessen-Kaesbach-Nishimura syndrome
MedGen UID:
376653
Concept ID:
C1849762
Disease or Syndrome
Gillessen-Kaesbach-Nishimura syndrome is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly disorder characterized by skeletal dysplasia, dysmorphic facial features, and variable visceral abnormalities, including polycystic kidneys, diaphragmatic hernia, lung hypoplasia, and congenital heart defects. It may be lethal in utero or early in life. The disorder is at the severe end of the phenotypic spectrum of congenital disorders of glycosylation (summary by Tham et al., 2016).
Epidermolysis bullosa with diaphragmatic hernia
MedGen UID:
346473
Concept ID:
C1856933
Congenital Abnormality
Donnai-Barrow syndrome
MedGen UID:
347406
Concept ID:
C1857277
Disease or Syndrome
Donnai-Barrow syndrome (DBS) is characterized by typical craniofacial features (large anterior fontanelle, wide metopic suture, widow's peak, markedly widely spaced eyes, enlarged globes, downslanted palpebral fissures, posteriorly rotated ears, depressed nasal bridge, and short nose. Ocular complications include high myopia, retinal detachment, retinal dystrophy, and progressive vision loss. Additional common features include agenesis of the corpus callosum, sensorineural hearing loss, intellectual disability, and congenital diaphragmatic hernia and/or omphalocele. Both inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability are observed.
Diaphragmatic hernia 2
MedGen UID:
347411
Concept ID:
C1857284
Anatomical Abnormality
Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a defect in the diaphragm. The diaphragm, which is composed of muscle and other fibrous tissue, separates the organs in the abdomen from those in the chest. Abnormal development of the diaphragm before birth leads to defects ranging from a thinned area in the diaphragm to its complete absence. An absent or partially formed diaphragm results in an abnormal opening (hernia) that allows the stomach and intestines to move into the chest cavity and crowd the heart and lungs. This crowding can lead to underdevelopment of the lungs (pulmonary hypoplasia), potentially resulting in life-threatening breathing difficulties that are apparent from birth.\n\nCongenital diaphragmatic hernias are often classified by their position. A Bochdalek hernia is a defect in the side or back of the diaphragm. Between 80 and 90 percent of congenital diaphragmatic hernias are of this type. A Morgnani hernia is a defect involving the front part of the diaphragm. This type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, which accounts for approximately 2 percent of cases, is less likely to cause severe symptoms at birth. Other types of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, such as those affecting the central region of the diaphragm, or those in which the diaphragm muscle is absent with only a thin membrane in its place, are rare.\n\nIn 5 to 10 percent of affected individuals, signs and symptoms of congenital diaphragmatic hernia appear later in life and may include breathing problems or abdominal pain from protrusion of the intestine into the chest cavity. In about 1 percent of cases, congenital diaphragmatic hernia has no symptoms; it may be detected incidentally when medical imaging is done for other reasons.
Diaphragmatic hernia 3
MedGen UID:
347546
Concept ID:
C1857781
Anatomical Abnormality
In 5 to 10 percent of affected individuals, signs and symptoms of congenital diaphragmatic hernia appear later in life and may include breathing problems or abdominal pain from protrusion of the intestine into the chest cavity. In about 1 percent of cases, congenital diaphragmatic hernia has no symptoms; it may be detected incidentally when medical imaging is done for other reasons.\n\nCongenital diaphragmatic hernias are often classified by their position. A Bochdalek hernia is a defect in the side or back of the diaphragm. Between 80 and 90 percent of congenital diaphragmatic hernias are of this type. A Morgnani hernia is a defect involving the front part of the diaphragm. This type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, which accounts for approximately 2 percent of cases, is less likely to cause severe symptoms at birth. Other types of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, such as those affecting the central region of the diaphragm, or those in which the diaphragm muscle is absent with only a thin membrane in its place, are rare.\n\nCongenital diaphragmatic hernia is a defect in the diaphragm. The diaphragm, which is composed of muscle and other fibrous tissue, separates the organs in the abdomen from those in the chest. Abnormal development of the diaphragm before birth leads to defects ranging from a thinned area in the diaphragm to its complete absence. An absent or partially formed diaphragm results in an abnormal opening (hernia) that allows the stomach and intestines to move into the chest cavity and crowd the heart and lungs. This crowding can lead to underdevelopment of the lungs (pulmonary hypoplasia), potentially resulting in life-threatening breathing difficulties that are apparent from birth.
Arterial tortuosity syndrome
MedGen UID:
347942
Concept ID:
C1859726
Disease or Syndrome
Arterial tortuosity syndrome (ATS) is characterized by widespread elongation and tortuosity of the aorta and mid-sized arteries as well as focal stenosis of segments of the pulmonary arteries and/or aorta combined with findings of a generalized connective tissue disorder, which may include soft or doughy hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility, inguinal hernia, and diaphragmatic hernia. Skeletal findings include pectus excavatum or carinatum, arachnodactyly, scoliosis, knee/elbow contractures, and camptodactyly. The cardiovascular system is the major source of morbidity and mortality with increased risk at any age for aneurysm formation and dissection both at the aortic root and throughout the arterial tree, and for ischemic vascular events involving cerebrovascular circulation (resulting in non-hemorrhagic stroke) and the abdominal arteries (resulting in infarctions of abdominal organs).
Acro-renal-mandibular syndrome
MedGen UID:
395425
Concept ID:
C1860166
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with characteristics of limb deficiencies and renal anomalies that include split hand-split foot malformation, renal agenesis, polycystic kidneys, uterine anomalies and severe mandibular hypoplasia.
Multicentric carpo-tarsal osteolysis with or without nephropathy
MedGen UID:
436237
Concept ID:
C2674705
Disease or Syndrome
Multicentric carpotarsal osteolysis syndrome is a rare skeletal disorder, usually presenting in early childhood with a clinical picture mimicking juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Progressive destruction of the carpal and tarsal bone usually occurs and other bones may also be involved. Chronic renal failure is a frequent component of the syndrome. Mental retardation and minor facial anomalies have been noted in some patients. Autosomal dominant inheritance has been documented in many families (Pai and Macpherson, 1988). See also Torg-Winchester syndrome (259600), an autosomal recessive multicentric osteolysis syndrome.
Chromosome 1q41-q42 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
382704
Concept ID:
C2675857
Disease or Syndrome
1q41q42 microdeletion syndrome is a chromosomal anomaly characterized by a severe developmental delay and/or intellectual disability, typical facial dysmorphic features, brain anomalies, seizures, cleft palate, clubfeet, nail hypoplasia and congenital heart disease.
SERKAL syndrome
MedGen UID:
394528
Concept ID:
C2678492
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome that has characteristics of female to male sex reversal and developmental anomalies of the kidneys, adrenal glands and lungs. The syndrome is lethal and has been described in three fetuses. It is caused by homozygous missense mutations in the WNT4 gene. It is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 10
MedGen UID:
412873
Concept ID:
C2750080
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Cardiospondylocarpofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
444060
Concept ID:
C2931461
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiospondylocarpofacial syndrome (CSCF) is characterized by growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, brachydactyly with carpal-tarsal fusion, extensive posterior cervical vertebral synostosis, cardiac septal defects with valve dysplasia, and deafness with inner ear malformations (summary by Le Goff et al., 2016).
Cocoon syndrome
MedGen UID:
462241
Concept ID:
C3150891
Disease or Syndrome
A rare lethal developmental defect during embryogenesis with characteristics of severe fetal malformations. These malformations include craniofacial dysmorphism (abnormal cyst in the cranial region, hypoplastic eyeballs, two orifices in the nasal region separated by a nasal septum, abnormal orifice replacing the mouth), omphalocele and immotile hypoplastic limbs encased under an abnormal, transparent membrane-like skin. Additional features include absence of adnexal structures of the skin on the outer aspect of the limbs, as well as underdeveloped skeletal muscles and bones. Association with tetralogy of Fallot, horseshoe kidneys, diaphragm and lung lobulation defects is reported.
Larsen-like syndrome, B3GAT3 type
MedGen UID:
480034
Concept ID:
C3278404
Disease or Syndrome
CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), clubfeet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect and vision are normal.
Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
481405
Concept ID:
C3279775
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, lack of psychomotor development, seizures, dysmorphic features, and variable congenital anomalies involving the cardiac, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems. Most affected individuals die before 3 years of age (summary by Maydan et al., 2011). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis; see GPIBD1 (610293). Genetic Heterogeneity of Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia-Seizures Syndrome MCAHS2 (300868) is caused by mutation in the PIGA gene (311770) on chromosome Xp22, MCAHS3 (615398) is caused by mutation in the PIGT gene (610272) on chromosome 20q13, and MCAHS4 (618548) is caused by mutation in the PIGQ gene (605754) on chromosome 16p13. Knaus et al. (2018) provided a review of the main clinical features of the different types of MCAHS, noting that patients with mutations in the PIGN, PIGA, and PIGT genes have distinct patterns of facial anomalies that can be detected by computer-assisted comparison. Some individuals with MCAHS may have variable increases in alkaline phosphatase (AP) as well as variable decreases in GPI-linked proteins that can be detected by flow cytometry. However, there was no clear correlation between AP levels or GPI-linked protein abnormalities and degree of neurologic involvement, mutation class, or gene involved. Knaus et al. (2018) concluded that a distinction between MCAHS and HPMRS1 (239300), which is also caused by mutation in genes involved in GPI biosynthesis, may be artificial and even inaccurate, and that all these disorders should be considered and classified together under the more encompassing term of 'GPI biosynthesis defects' (GPIBD).
Chromosome 15q25 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
481985
Concept ID:
C3280355
Disease or Syndrome
Cutis laxa, autosomal recessive, type 1B
MedGen UID:
482428
Concept ID:
C3280798
Disease or Syndrome
EFEMP2-related cutis laxa, or autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1B (ARCL1B), is characterized by cutis laxa and systemic involvement, most commonly arterial tortuosity, aneurysms, and stenosis; retrognathia; joint laxity; and arachnodactyly. Severity ranges from perinatal lethality as a result of cardiopulmonary failure to manifestations limited to the vascular and craniofacial systems.
Coffin-Siris syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
482831
Concept ID:
C3281201
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is classically characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth and additional digits, developmental or cognitive delay of varying degree, distinctive facial features, hypotonia, hirsutism/hypertrichosis, and sparse scalp hair. Congenital anomalies can include malformations of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and/or central nervous systems. Other findings commonly include feeding difficulties, slow growth, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and hearing impairment.
Linear skin defects with multiple congenital anomalies 2
MedGen UID:
763835
Concept ID:
C3550921
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia and/or anophthalmia and linear skin defects, usually involving the face and neck, which are present at birth and heal with age, leaving minimal residual scarring. Other findings can include a wide variety of other ocular abnormalities (e.g., corneal anomalies, orbital cysts, cataracts), central nervous system involvement (e.g., structural anomalies, developmental delay, infantile seizures), cardiac concerns (e.g., hypertrophic or oncocytic cardiomyopathy, atrial or ventricular septal defects, arrhythmias), short stature, diaphragmatic hernia, nail dystrophy, hearing impairment, and genitourinary malformations. Inter- and intrafamilial variability is described.
Microphthalmia, syndromic 12
MedGen UID:
816133
Concept ID:
C3809803
Disease or Syndrome
Syndromic microphthalmia-12 is a rare disease characterized by bilateral small eyeballs (microphthalmia), lungs that are too small (pulmonary hypoplasia), and a defect or hole in the diaphragm that allows the abdominal contents to move into the chest cavity (diaphragmatic hernia). Other symptoms may include: Severe global developmental delay with progressive motor impairment due to spasticity and/or uncontrolled repetitive muscular contractions (dystonia), with or without abnormal quick movements that resemble dancing (chorea), Defects of the cerebellum (Chiari type I malformation) Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid inside the brain (hydrocephaly), Severe feeding difficulties, Mild facial dysmorphism with broad nasal root and tip, and a very small chin (micrognathia), Severe language delay, Wheelchair-bound. Syndromic microphthalmia-12 is caused by mutations in the RARB gene. There is no specific treatment for this syndrome.
Tetraamelia syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
860705
Concept ID:
C4012268
Disease or Syndrome
Tetraamelia syndrome-1 (TETAMS1) is characterized by complete limb agenesis without defects of scapulae or clavicles. Other features include bilateral cleft lip/palate, diaphragmatic defect with bilobar right lung, renal and adrenal agenesis, pelvic hypoplasia, and urogenital defects (Niemann et al., 2004). Genetic Heterogeneity of tetraamelia syndrome Tetraamelia syndrome-2 (TETAMS2; 618021) is caused by mutation in the RSPO2 gene (610575) on chromosome 8q23.
Pancreatic hypoplasia-diabetes-congenital heart disease syndrome
MedGen UID:
860891
Concept ID:
C4012454
Congenital Abnormality
A rare, syndromic diabetes mellitus characterized by partial pancreatic agenesis, diabetes mellitus, and heart anomalies (including transposition of the great vessels, ventricular or atrial septal defects, pulmonary stenosis, or patent ductus arteriosis).
Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder 2
MedGen UID:
863113
Concept ID:
C4014676
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder-2 is an autosomal recessive syndrome resulting from defects in DNA excision repair. Affected individuals have a neurodegenerative phenotype characterized by developmental delay, ataxia, and sensorineural hearing loss. Other features include short stature, cutaneous and ocular telangiectasia, and photosensitivity (summary by Baple et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ATLD, see ATLD1 (604391).
Seckel syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
907155
Concept ID:
C4225212
Disease or Syndrome
Any Seckel syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the TRAIP gene.
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia 14 with polydactyly
MedGen UID:
901479
Concept ID:
C4225286
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia with or without polydactyly, see SRTD1 (208500).
Intellectual disability-microcephaly-strabismus-behavioral abnormalities syndrome
MedGen UID:
897984
Concept ID:
C4225351
Disease or Syndrome
White-Sutton syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a wide spectrum of cognitive dysfunction, developmental delays (particularly in speech and language acquisition), hypotonia, autism spectrum disorder, and other behavioral problems. Additional features commonly reported include seizures, refractive errors and strabismus, hearing loss, sleep disturbance (particularly sleep apnea), feeding and gastrointestinal problems, mild genital abnormalities in males, and urinary tract involvement in both males and females.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 15 with mandibulofacial dysostosis
MedGen UID:
902755
Concept ID:
C4225411
Disease or Syndrome
Any Diamond-Blackfan anemia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the RPS28 gene.
Intellectual disability, X-linked 61
MedGen UID:
924419
Concept ID:
C4283894
Disease or Syndrome
Tonne-Kalscheuer syndrome (TOKAS) is an X-linked recessive multiple congenital anomaly disorder with 2 main presentations. Most patients exhibit global developmental delay apparent from early infancy, impaired intellectual development, speech delay, behavioral abnormalities, and abnormal gait. Affected individuals also have dysmorphic facial features that evolve with age, anomalies of the hands, feet, and nails, and urogenital abnormalities with hypogenitalism. A subset of more severely affected males develop congenital diaphragmatic hernia in utero, which may result in perinatal or premature death. Carrier females may have very mild skeletal or hormonal abnormalities (summary by Frints et al., 2019). Also see Fryns syndrome (229850), an autosomal recessive disorder with overlapping features.
SIN3A-related intellectual disability syndrome due to a point mutation
MedGen UID:
934771
Concept ID:
C4310804
Disease or Syndrome
Witteveen-Kolk syndrome (WITKOS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with characteristic distinctive facial features, microcephaly, short stature, and mildly impaired intellectual development with delayed cognitive and motor development and subtle anomalies on MRI-brain imaging (summary by Balasubramanian et al., 2021).
Congenital heart defects and skeletal malformations syndrome
MedGen UID:
1618340
Concept ID:
C4539857
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital heart defects and skeletal malformations syndrome (CHDSKM) is characterized by atrial and ventricular septal defects, with aortic root dilation in adulthood. Skeletal defects are variable and include pectus excavatum, scoliosis, and finger contractures, and some patients exhibit joint laxity. Failure to thrive is observed during infancy and early childhood (Wang et al., 2017).
Congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract syndrome with or without hearing loss, abnormal ears, or developmental delay
MedGen UID:
1612119
Concept ID:
C4539968
Disease or Syndrome
CAKUTHED is an autosomal dominant highly pleiotropic developmental disorder characterized mainly by variable congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, sometimes resulting in renal dysfunction or failure, dysmorphic facial features, and abnormalities of the outer ear, often with hearing loss. Most patients have global developmental delay (summary by Heidet et al., 2017 and Slavotinek et al., 2017).
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1645760
Concept ID:
C4551851
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Humerofemoral hypoplasia with radiotibial ray deficiency
MedGen UID:
1648393
Concept ID:
C4747940
Congenital Abnormality
Humerofemoral hypoplasia with radiotibial ray deficiency (HHRRD) is a severe dysostosis characterized by reduction of all 4 limbs as well as hypoplasia of the upper limb girdle and pelvis. Rudimentary finger- or toe-like appendages may be present (Szenker-Ravi et al., 2018).
Cardiac-urogenital syndrome
MedGen UID:
1648333
Concept ID:
C4748946
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiac-urogenital syndrome is characterized by partial anomalous pulmonary venous return in association with tracheal anomalies, pulmonary hypoplasia, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, thyroid fibrosis, thymic involution, cleft spleen, penoscrotal hypospadias, and cryptorchidism (Pinz et al., 2018).
Mullegama-Klein-Martinez syndrome
MedGen UID:
1683985
Concept ID:
C5193008
Disease or Syndrome
Mullegama-Klein-Martinez syndrome (MKMS) is an X-linked recessive disorder with features of microcephaly, microtia, hearing loss, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, congenital heart defect, and digit abnormalities. Females are generally affected more severely than males (Mullegama et al., 2019).
Developmental delay with or without dysmorphic facies and autism
MedGen UID:
1679263
Concept ID:
C5193106
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay with or without dysmorphic facies and autism (DEDDFA) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder apparent from infancy or early childhood and associated with variably impaired intellectual development. Some patients may be severely affected with no speech and inability to walk, whereas others may be able to attend special schools or have normal intellectual function associated with autism spectrum disorder and mild speech delay. Genetic analysis has suggested that the phenotype can be broadly categorized into 2 main groups. Patients with TRRAP mutations affecting residues 1031-1159 have a more severe disorder, often with multisystem involvement, including renal, cardiac, and genitourinary systems, as well as structural brain abnormalities. Patients with mutations outside of that region tend to have a less severe phenotype with a higher incidence of autism and usually no systemic involvement. Patients in both groups usually have somewhat similar dysmorphic facial features, such as upslanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, low-set ears, and broad or depressed nasal bridge, although these features are highly variable (summary by Cogne et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with spastic quadriplegia, optic atrophy, seizures, and structural brain anomalies
MedGen UID:
1684884
Concept ID:
C5231442
Disease or Syndrome
Halperin-Birk syndrome (HLBKS) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by structural brain defects, spastic quadriplegia with multiple contractures, profound developmental delay, seizures, dysmorphism, cataract, and optic nerve atrophy. Death occurs in early childhood (Halperin et al., 2019).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 85, with or without midline brain defects
MedGen UID:
1708832
Concept ID:
C5393312
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-85 with or without midline brain defects (DEE85) is an X-linked neurologic disorder characterized by onset of severe refractory seizures in the first year of life, global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and poor or absent speech, and dysmorphic facial features. The seizures tend to show a cyclic pattern with clustering. Many patients have midline brain defects on brain imaging, including thin corpus callosum and/or variable forms of holoprosencephaly (HPE). The severity and clinical manifestations are variable. Almost all reported patients are females with de novo mutations predicted to result in a loss of function (LOF). However, some patients may show skewed X inactivation, and the pathogenic mechanism may be due to a dominant-negative effect. The SMC1A protein is part of the multiprotein cohesin complex involved in chromatid cohesion during DNA replication and transcriptional regulation; DEE85 can thus be classified as a 'cohesinopathy' (summary by Symonds et al., 2017 and Kruszka et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
CEBALID syndrome
MedGen UID:
1710973
Concept ID:
C5394044
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with MN1 C-terminal truncation (MCTT) syndrome have mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, severe expressive language delay, dysmorphic facial features (midface hypoplasia, downslanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, exophthalmia, short upturned nose, and small low-set ears), and distinctive findings on brain imaging (including perisylvian polymicrogyria and atypical rhombencephalosynapsis). Mild-to-moderate prelingual hearing loss (usually bilateral, conductive, and/or sensorineural) is common. Generalized seizures (observed in the minority of individuals) are responsive to anti-seizure medication. There is an increased risk for craniosynostosis and, thus, increased intracranial pressure. To date, 25 individuals with MCTT syndrome have been identified.
Diets-Jongmans syndrome
MedGen UID:
1714920
Concept ID:
C5394263
Disease or Syndrome
Diets-Jongmans syndrome (DIJOS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mild to moderately impaired intellectual development with a recognizable facial gestalt (summary by Diets et al., 2019).
Zaki syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794247
Concept ID:
C5562037
Disease or Syndrome
Zaki syndrome (ZKS) is characterized by developmental delay, progressive microcephaly, and short stature, as well as dysmorphic features including sparse scalp hair, cupped ears, wide nose and mouth, short philtrum, and high-arched palate. Other variable features have been observed, including ocular, skeletal, cardiac, and renal anomalies (Chai et al., 2021).
Ferguson-Bonni neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794275
Concept ID:
C5562065
Disease or Syndrome
Ferguson-Bonni neurodevelopmental syndrome (FERBON) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, and hypotonia with early motor delay. Additional features may include dysmorphic facies, mild skeletal abnormalities, and hearing loss (summary by Ferguson et al., 2022).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Cordier AG, Russo FM, Deprest J, Benachi A
Semin Perinatol 2020 Feb;44(1):51163. Epub 2019 Jul 30 doi: 10.1053/j.semperi.2019.07.002. PMID: 31439324
Dingeldein M
Adv Pediatr 2018 Aug;65(1):241-247. Epub 2018 Jun 12 doi: 10.1016/j.yapd.2018.05.001. PMID: 30053927
Kosiński P, Wielgoś M
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(1):24-30. doi: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0005. PMID: 28157247

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Danzer E, Rintoul NE, van Meurs KP, Deprest J
Semin Fetal Neonatal Med 2022 Dec;27(6):101406. Epub 2022 Nov 17 doi: 10.1016/j.siny.2022.101406. PMID: 36456433
Kirby E, Keijzer R
Pediatr Surg Int 2020 Apr;36(4):415-429. Epub 2020 Feb 18 doi: 10.1007/s00383-020-04625-z. PMID: 32072236
Cordier AG, Russo FM, Deprest J, Benachi A
Semin Perinatol 2020 Feb;44(1):51163. Epub 2019 Jul 30 doi: 10.1053/j.semperi.2019.07.002. PMID: 31439324
Leeuwen L, Fitzgerald DA
J Paediatr Child Health 2014 Sep;50(9):667-73. Epub 2014 Feb 17 doi: 10.1111/jpc.12508. PMID: 24528549
Keijzer R, Puri P
Semin Pediatr Surg 2010 Aug;19(3):180-5. doi: 10.1053/j.sempedsurg.2010.03.001. PMID: 20610190

Diagnosis

Kirby E, Keijzer R
Pediatr Surg Int 2020 Apr;36(4):415-429. Epub 2020 Feb 18 doi: 10.1007/s00383-020-04625-z. PMID: 32072236
Cordier AG, Russo FM, Deprest J, Benachi A
Semin Perinatol 2020 Feb;44(1):51163. Epub 2019 Jul 30 doi: 10.1053/j.semperi.2019.07.002. PMID: 31439324
Dingeldein M
Adv Pediatr 2018 Aug;65(1):241-247. Epub 2018 Jun 12 doi: 10.1016/j.yapd.2018.05.001. PMID: 30053927
Canadian Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Collaborative, Puligandla PS, Skarsgard ED, Offringa M, Adatia I, Baird R, Bailey M, Brindle M, Chiu P, Cogswell A, Dakshinamurti S, Flageole H, Keijzer R, McMillan D, Oluyomi-Obi T, Pennaforte T, Perreault T, Piedboeuf B, Riley SP, Ryan G, Synnes A, Traynor M
CMAJ 2018 Jan 29;190(4):E103-E112. doi: 10.1503/cmaj.170206. PMID: 29378870Free PMC Article
Kosiński P, Wielgoś M
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(1):24-30. doi: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0005. PMID: 28157247

Therapy

Deprest JA, Nicolaides KH, Benachi A, Gratacos E, Ryan G, Persico N, Sago H, Johnson A, Wielgoś M, Berg C, Van Calster B, Russo FM; TOTAL Trial for Severe Hypoplasia Investigators
N Engl J Med 2021 Jul 8;385(2):107-118. Epub 2021 Jun 8 doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2027030. PMID: 34106556Free PMC Article
Deprest JA, Benachi A, Gratacos E, Nicolaides KH, Berg C, Persico N, Belfort M, Gardener GJ, Ville Y, Johnson A, Morini F, Wielgoś M, Van Calster B, DeKoninck PLJ; TOTAL Trial for Moderate Hypoplasia Investigators
N Engl J Med 2021 Jul 8;385(2):119-129. Epub 2021 Jun 8 doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2026983. PMID: 34106555Free PMC Article
Patel N, Massolo AC, Kipfmueller F
Semin Perinatol 2020 Feb;44(1):151168. Epub 2019 Jul 30 doi: 10.1053/j.semperi.2019.07.007. PMID: 31420110
Snoek KG, Reiss IK, Greenough A, Capolupo I, Urlesberger B, Wessel L, Storme L, Deprest J, Schaible T, van Heijst A, Tibboel D; CDH EURO Consortium
Neonatology 2016;110(1):66-74. Epub 2016 Apr 15 doi: 10.1159/000444210. PMID: 27077664
Polin RA, Carlo WA; Committee on Fetus and Newborn; American Academy of Pediatrics
Pediatrics 2014 Jan;133(1):156-63. Epub 2013 Dec 30 doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-3443. PMID: 24379227

Prognosis

Kirby E, Keijzer R
Pediatr Surg Int 2020 Apr;36(4):415-429. Epub 2020 Feb 18 doi: 10.1007/s00383-020-04625-z. PMID: 32072236
Jancelewicz T, Brindle ME
Semin Perinatol 2020 Feb;44(1):151165. Epub 2019 Jul 31 doi: 10.1053/j.semperi.2019.07.004. PMID: 31676044
Malloy C, Wubbenhorst MC, Lee TS
Issues Law Med 2019 Spring;34(1):15-41. PMID: 31179670
Izumi K, Krantz ID
Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 2014 Dec;166C(4):406-13. Epub 2014 Nov 25 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31423. PMID: 25425112
Leeuwen L, Fitzgerald DA
J Paediatr Child Health 2014 Sep;50(9):667-73. Epub 2014 Feb 17 doi: 10.1111/jpc.12508. PMID: 24528549

Clinical prediction guides

Schreiner Y, Schaible T, Rafat N
Eur J Hum Genet 2021 Dec;29(12):1729-1733. Epub 2021 Oct 8 doi: 10.1038/s41431-021-00972-0. PMID: 34621023Free PMC Article
Mehollin-Ray AR
Pediatr Radiol 2020 Dec;50(13):1855-1871. Epub 2020 Nov 30 doi: 10.1007/s00247-020-04718-w. PMID: 33252754
Chatterjee D, Ing RJ, Gien J
Anesth Analg 2020 Sep;131(3):808-821. doi: 10.1213/ANE.0000000000004324. PMID: 31335403
McHoney M, Hammond P
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2018 Mar;103(2):F178-F181. Epub 2017 Nov 14 doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2016-311707. PMID: 29138242
Daodu O, Brindle ME
Semin Pediatr Surg 2017 Jun;26(3):136-139. Epub 2017 Apr 24 doi: 10.1053/j.sempedsurg.2017.04.010. PMID: 28641750

Recent systematic reviews

Adams LE, Chapman A, Cormack CL, Campbell K, Ebanks AH, Annibale DJ, Hollinger LE
J Pediatr Surg 2022 Sep;57(9):24-28. Epub 2021 Nov 20 doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2021.11.005. PMID: 34865829
Prasad R, Saha B, Kumar A
Eur J Pediatr 2022 Mar;181(3):1071-1083. Epub 2021 Nov 1 doi: 10.1007/s00431-021-04303-9. PMID: 34725730
Paoletti M, Raffler G, Gaffi MS, Antounians L, Lauriti G, Zani A
J Pediatr Surg 2020 Nov;55(11):2297-2307. Epub 2020 Jun 20 doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2020.06.022. PMID: 32690291
Morche J, Mathes T, Jacobs A, Pietsch B, Wessel L, Gruber S, Neugebauer EAM, Pieper D
J Pediatr Surg 2020 Dec;55(12):2555-2565. Epub 2020 Apr 1 doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2020.03.025. PMID: 32376012
Terui K, Nagata K, Ito M, Yamoto M, Shiraishi M, Taguchi T, Hayakawa M, Okuyama H, Yoshida H, Masumoto K, Kanamori Y, Goishi K, Urushihara N, Kawataki M, Inamura N, Kimura O, Okazaki T, Toyoshima K, Usui N
Pediatr Surg Int 2015 Oct;31(10):891-7. Epub 2015 Aug 18 doi: 10.1007/s00383-015-3765-1. PMID: 26280741

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