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Hurler syndrome(MPS1-H)

MedGen UID:
39698
Concept ID:
C0086795
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Gargoylism, Hurler Syndrome; MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDOSIS TYPE IH
SNOMED CT: Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-I-H (65327002); L-iduronidase deficiency, Hurler type (65327002); Lipochondrodystrophy (65327002); Gargoylism (65327002); Hurler's syndrome (65327002); Hurler-Pfaundler syndrome (65327002); Dysostosis multiplex syndrome (65327002); Dysostosis multiplex (254069004); MPS 1-H - Mucopolysaccharidosis type I-H (65327002); Mucopolysaccharidosis type I-H (65327002); Hurler disease MPS type 1H (65327002); Mucopolysaccharidosis type I severe form (65327002)
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in individuals with two pathogenic alleles, either homozygotes (two copies of the same mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
 
Gene (location): IDUA (4p16.3)
 
HPO: HP:0000943
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0011758
OMIM®: 607014
Orphanet: ORPHA93473

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common. [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
Lorne A Clarke   view full author information

Additional description

From OMIM
The mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of inherited disorders caused by a lack of specific lysosomal enzymes involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), or mucopolysaccharides. The accumulation of partially degraded GAGs causes interference with cell, tissue, and organ function. Deficiency of alpha-L-iduronidase can result in a wide range of phenotypic involvement with 3 major recognized clinical entities: Hurler (MPS IH), Scheie (MPS IS; 607016), and Hurler-Scheie (MPS IH/S; 607015) syndromes. Hurler and Scheie syndromes represent phenotypes at the severe and mild ends of the MPS I clinical spectrum, respectively, and the Hurler-Scheie syndrome is intermediate in phenotypic expression (McKusick, 1972). MPS I is more frequent than MPS II (Hunter syndrome; 309900), which has no corneal clouding and pursues a slower course.  http://www.omim.org/entry/607014

Clinical features

From HPO
Dermatan sulfate excretion in urine
MedGen UID:
343207
Concept ID:
C1854774
Finding
An increased concentration of dermatan sulfate in the urine.
Heparan sulfate excretion in urine
MedGen UID:
340721
Concept ID:
C1854827
Finding
An increased concentration of heparan sulfates in the urine.
Urinary glycosaminoglycan excretion
MedGen UID:
871129
Concept ID:
C4025598
Finding
Excretion of glycosaminoglycan in the urine. Glycosaminoglycans are long unbranched polysaccharides consisting of a repeating disaccharide unit.
Coxa valga
MedGen UID:
116080
Concept ID:
C0239137
Finding
Coxa valga is a deformity of the hip in which the angle between the femoral shaft and the femoral neck is increased compared to age-adjusted values (about 150 degrees in newborns gradually reducing to 120-130 degrees in adults).
Aortic regurgitation
MedGen UID:
8153
Concept ID:
C0003504
Disease or Syndrome
An insufficiency of the aortic valve, leading to regurgitation (backward flow) of blood from the aorta into the left ventricle.
Endocardial fibroelastosis
MedGen UID:
4041
Concept ID:
C0014117
Disease or Syndrome
Diffuse thickening of the ventricular endocardium and by associated myocardial dysfunction
Mitral regurgitation
MedGen UID:
7670
Concept ID:
C0026266
Disease or Syndrome
An abnormality of the mitral valve characterized by insufficiency or incompetence of the mitral valve resulting in retrograde leaking of blood through the mitral valve upon ventricular contraction.
Cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
209232
Concept ID:
C0878544
Disease or Syndrome
A myocardial disorder in which the heart muscle is structurally and functionally abnormal, in the absence of coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease and congenital heart disease sufficient to cause the observed myocardial abnormality.
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
A height below that which is expected according to age and gender norms. Although there is no universally accepted definition of short stature, many refer to "short stature" as height more than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender (or below the 3rd percentile for age and gender dependent norms).
Hepatomegaly
MedGen UID:
42428
Concept ID:
C0019209
Finding
Abnormally increased size of the liver.
Hepatosplenomegaly
MedGen UID:
9225
Concept ID:
C0019214
Sign or Symptom
Simultaneous enlargement of the liver and spleen.
Protuberant abdomen
MedGen UID:
340750
Concept ID:
C1854928
Finding
A thrusting or bulging out of the abdomen.
Hearing impairment
MedGen UID:
235586
Concept ID:
C1384666
Disease or Syndrome
A decreased magnitude of the sensory perception of sound.
Hydrocephalus
MedGen UID:
9335
Concept ID:
C0020255
Disease or Syndrome
Hydrocephalus is an active distension of the ventricular system of the brain resulting from inadequate passage of CSF from its point of production within the cerebral ventricles to its point of absorption into the systemic circulation.
Neurodegeneration
MedGen UID:
17999
Concept ID:
C0027746
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
Progressive loss of neural cells and tissue.
Global developmental delay
MedGen UID:
107838
Concept ID:
C0557874
Finding
A delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child, including motor skills, speech and language, cognitive skills, and social and emotional skills. This term should only be used to describe children younger than five years of age.
Progressive neurologic deterioration
MedGen UID:
381506
Concept ID:
C1854838
Finding
Intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
811461
Concept ID:
C3714756
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, is characterized by subnormal intellectual functioning that occurs during the developmental period. It is defined by an IQ score below 70.
Abnormal CNS myelination
MedGen UID:
866800
Concept ID:
C4021152
Anatomical Abnormality
An abnormality of myelination of nerves in the central nervous system.
Constrictive median neuropathy
MedGen UID:
868610
Concept ID:
C4023009
Anatomical Abnormality
Injury to the median nerve caused by its entrapment at the wrist as it traverses through the carpal tunnel. Clinically, constrictive median neuropathy is characterized by pain, paresthesia, and weakness in the median nerve distribution of the hand.
Hernia
MedGen UID:
6816
Concept ID:
C0019270
Finding
The protrusion of part of an organ or fibroadipose tissue through an abnormal opening.
Inguinal hernia
MedGen UID:
6817
Concept ID:
C0019294
Finding
Protrusion of the contents of the abdominal cavity through the inguinal canal.
Umbilical hernia
MedGen UID:
9232
Concept ID:
C0019322
Anatomical Abnormality
Protrusion of abdominal contents through a defect in the abdominal wall musculature around the umbilicus. Skin and subcutaneous tissue overlie the defect.
Kyphosis
MedGen UID:
44042
Concept ID:
C0022821
Anatomical Abnormality
Exaggerated anterior convexity of the thoracic vertebral column.
Hurler syndrome
MedGen UID:
39698
Concept ID:
C0086795
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common.
Joint stiffness
MedGen UID:
56403
Concept ID:
C0162298
Sign or Symptom
Joint stiffness is a perceived sensation of tightness in a joint or joints when attempting to move them after a period of inactivity. Joint stiffness typically subsides over time.
Frontal bossing
MedGen UID:
67453
Concept ID:
C0221354
Congenital Abnormality
Bilateral bulging of the lateral frontal bone prominences with relative sparing of the midline.
Flexion contracture
MedGen UID:
83069
Concept ID:
C0333068
Anatomical Abnormality
A flexion contracture is a bent (flexed) joint that cannot be straightened actively or passively. It is thus a chronic loss of joint motion due to structural changes in muscle, tendons, ligaments, or skin that prevents normal movement of joints.
Short clavicles
MedGen UID:
96529
Concept ID:
C0426799
Congenital Abnormality
Reduced length of the clavicles.
Cranial hyperostosis
MedGen UID:
318629
Concept ID:
C1832451
Finding
Excessive growth of the bones of cranium, i.e., of the skull.
Diaphyseal thickening
MedGen UID:
331984
Concept ID:
C1835473
Finding
Odontoid hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
339524
Concept ID:
C1846439
Finding
The odontoid process, or dens, is a bony projection from the axis (C2) upward into the ring of the atlas (C1) at the top of the spine. During embryogenesis, the body of the odontoid derives from the centrum of the atlas and separates from the atlas, fusing with the superior portion of the axis. If the odontoid is hypoplastic or absent, the attachments for the apical and alar ligaments are missing, allowing for excessive rotation of the atlas, craniocervical instability, and possibly cord compression (summary by Stevens et al., 2009).
C1-C2 subluxation
MedGen UID:
376359
Concept ID:
C1848446
Finding
A partial dislocation of the atlantoaxial joints.
Metaphyseal widening
MedGen UID:
341364
Concept ID:
C1849039
Finding
Abnormal widening of the metaphyseal regions of long bones.
J-shaped sella turcica
MedGen UID:
381480
Concept ID:
C1854718
Finding
A deformity of the sella turcica whereby the sella extends further anterior than normal such that the anterior clinoid process appears to overhang it, giving the appearance of the letter J on imaging of the skull.
Biconcave vertebral bodies
MedGen UID:
383834
Concept ID:
C1856087
Finding
Exaggerated concavity of the anterior or posterior surface of the vertebral body, i.e., the upper and lower vertebral endplates are hollowed inward.
Hypoplasia of the femoral head
MedGen UID:
384014
Concept ID:
C1856920
Anatomical Abnormality
Underdevelopment of the femoral head.
Calvarial hyperostosis
MedGen UID:
350147
Concept ID:
C1863351
Finding
Excessive growth of the calvaria.
Flared iliac wing
MedGen UID:
356097
Concept ID:
C1865841
Finding
Widening of the ilium ala, that is of the wing of the ilium, combined with external rotation, leading to a flared appearance of the iliac wing.
Macrocephaly
MedGen UID:
745757
Concept ID:
C2243051
Finding
Occipitofrontal (head) circumference greater than 97th centile compared to appropriate, age matched, sex-matched normal standards. Alternatively, a apparently increased size of the cranium.
Recurrent respiratory infections
MedGen UID:
812812
Concept ID:
C3806482
Finding
An increased susceptibility to respiratory infections as manifested by a history of recurrent respiratory infections.
Splenomegaly
MedGen UID:
52469
Concept ID:
C0038002
Finding
Abnormal increased size of the spleen.
Enlarged tonsils
MedGen UID:
78800
Concept ID:
C0272386
Disease or Syndrome
Increase in size of the tonsils, small collections of lymphoid tissue facing into the aerodigestive tract on either side of the back part of the throat.
Recurrent otitis media
MedGen UID:
155436
Concept ID:
C0747085
Disease or Syndrome
Increased susceptibility to otitis media, as manifested by recurrent episodes of otitis media.
Macroglossia
MedGen UID:
44236
Concept ID:
C0024421
Disease or Syndrome
Increased length and width of the tongue.
Microdontia
MedGen UID:
66008
Concept ID:
C0240340
Congenital Abnormality
Decreased size of the teeth, which can be defined as a mesiodistal tooth diameter (width) more than 2 SD below mean. Alternatively, an apparently decreased maximum width of tooth.
Gingival overgrowth
MedGen UID:
87712
Concept ID:
C0376480
Finding
Hyperplasia of the gingiva (that is, a thickening of the soft tissue overlying the alveolar ridge. The degree of thickening ranges from involvement of the interdental papillae alone to gingival overgrowth covering the entire tooth crown.
Broad nasal tip
MedGen UID:
98424
Concept ID:
C0426429
Finding
Increase in width of the nasal tip.
Short neck
MedGen UID:
99267
Concept ID:
C0521525
Finding
Diminished length of the neck.
Depressed nasal bridge
MedGen UID:
373112
Concept ID:
C1836542
Finding
Posterior positioning of the nasal root in relation to the overall facial profile for age.
Thick vermilion border
MedGen UID:
332232
Concept ID:
C1836543
Finding
Increased width of the skin of vermilion border region of upper lip.
Anteverted nares
MedGen UID:
326648
Concept ID:
C1840077
Finding
Anteriorly-facing nostrils viewed with the head in the Frankfurt horizontal and the eyes of the observer level with the eyes of the subject. This gives the appearance of an upturned nose (upturned nasal tip).
Coarse facial features
MedGen UID:
335284
Concept ID:
C1845847
Finding
Absence of fine and sharp appearance of brows, nose, lips, mouth, and chin, usually because of rounded and heavy features or thickened skin with or without thickening of subcutaneous and bony tissues.
Wide nasal bridge
MedGen UID:
341441
Concept ID:
C1849367
Finding
Increased breadth of the nasal bridge (and with it, the nasal root).
Full cheeks
MedGen UID:
355661
Concept ID:
C1866231
Finding
Increased prominence or roundness of soft tissues between zygomata and mandible.
Hirsutism
MedGen UID:
42461
Concept ID:
C0019572
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormally increased hair growth referring to a male pattern of body hair (androgenic hair).
Corneal opacity
MedGen UID:
40485
Concept ID:
C0010038
Finding
A reduction of corneal clarity.
Glaucoma
MedGen UID:
42224
Concept ID:
C0017601
Disease or Syndrome
Glaucoma refers loss of retinal ganglion cells in a characteristic pattern of optic neuropathy usually associated with increased intraocular pressure.
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
9373
Concept ID:
C0020534
Finding
Although hypertelorism means an excessive distance between any paired organs (e.g., the nipples), the use of the word has come to be confined to ocular hypertelorism. Hypertelorism occurs as an isolated feature and is also a feature of many syndromes, e.g., Opitz G syndrome (see 300000), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly (175700), and Noonan syndrome (163950) (summary by Cohen et al., 1995).
Retinal degeneration
MedGen UID:
48432
Concept ID:
C0035304
Finding
A nonspecific term denoting degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium and/or retinal photoreceptor cells.
Opacification of the corneal stroma
MedGen UID:
602191
Concept ID:
C0423250
Finding
Reduced transparency of the stroma of cornea.
Bilateral ptosis
MedGen UID:
356120
Concept ID:
C1865916
Disease or Syndrome

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
Follow this link to review classifications for Hurler syndrome in Orphanet.

Conditions with this feature

Fucosidosis
MedGen UID:
5288
Concept ID:
C0016788
Disease or Syndrome
Fucosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by defective alpha-L-fucosidase with accumulation of fucose in the tissues. Clinical features include angiokeratoma, progressive psychomotor retardation, neurologic signs, coarse facial features, and dysostosis multiplex. Fucosidosis has been classified into 2 major types. Type 1 is characterized by rapid psychomotor regression and severe neurologic deterioration beginning at about 6 months of age, elevated sweat sodium chloride, and death within the first decade of life. Type 2 is characterized by milder psychomotor retardation and neurologic signs, the development of angiokeratoma corporis diffusum, normal sweat salinity, and longer survival (Kousseff et al., 1976).
Deficiency of alpha-mannosidase
MedGen UID:
7467
Concept ID:
C0024748
Disease or Syndrome
Alpha-mannosidosis encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from mild to severe. Three major clinical subtypes have been suggested: A mild form recognized after age ten years with absence of skeletal abnormalities, myopathy, and slow progression (type 1). A moderate form recognized before age ten years with presence of skeletal abnormalities, myopathy, and slow progression (type 2). A severe form manifested as prenatal loss or early death from progressive central nervous system involvement or infection (type 3). Individuals with a milder phenotype have mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, impaired hearing, characteristic coarse features, clinical or radiographic skeletal abnormalities, immunodeficiency, and primary central nervous system disease – mainly cerebellar involvement causing ataxia. Periods of psychiatric symptoms are common. Associated medical problems can include corneal opacities, hepatosplenomegaly, aseptic destructive arthritis, and metabolic myopathy. Alpha-mannosidosis is insidiously progressive; some individuals may live into the sixth decade.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-II
MedGen UID:
7734
Concept ID:
C0026705
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II; also known as Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked multisystem disorder characterized by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation. The vast majority of affected individuals are male; on rare occasion heterozygous females manifest findings. Age of onset, disease severity, and rate of progression vary significantly among affected males. In those with early progressive disease, CNS involvement (manifest primarily by progressive cognitive deterioration), progressive airway disease, and cardiac disease usually result in death in the first or second decade of life. In those with slowly progressive disease, the CNS is not (or is minimally) affected, although the effect of GAG accumulation on other organ systems may be early progressive to the same degree as in those who have progressive cognitive decline. Survival into the early adult years with normal intelligence is common in the slowly progressing form of the disease. Additional findings in both forms of MPS II include: short stature; macrocephaly with or without communicating hydrocephalus; macroglossia; hoarse voice; conductive and sensorineural hearing loss; hepatosplenomegaly; dysostosis multiplex; spinal stenosis; and carpal tunnel syndrome.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-I-S
MedGen UID:
6453
Concept ID:
C0026708
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common.
Mucopolysaccharidosis type 6
MedGen UID:
44514
Concept ID:
C0026709
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS6) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of arylsulfatase B. Clinical features and severity are variable, but usually include short stature, hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, stiff joints, corneal clouding, cardiac abnormalities, and facial dysmorphism. Intelligence is usually normal (Azevedo et al., 2004).
Pseudo-Hurler polydystrophy
MedGen UID:
10988
Concept ID:
C0033788
Disease or Syndrome
GNPTAB-related disorders comprise the phenotypes mucolipidosis II (ML II) and mucolipidosis IIIa/ß (ML IIIa/ß), and phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß. ML II is evident at birth and slowly progressive; death most often occurs in early childhood. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Growth often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. All children have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways, and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. ML IIIa/ß becomes evident at about age three years with slow growth rate and short stature; joint stiffness and pain initially in the shoulders, hips, and fingers; gradual mild coarsening of facial features; and normal to mildly impaired cognitive development. Pain from osteoporosis becomes more severe during adolescence. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease, thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves, left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy) are common causes of death, typically in early to middle adulthood. Phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß are characterized by physical growth in infancy that resembles that of ML II and neuromotor and speech development that resemble that of ML IIIa/ß.
Mucopolysaccharidosis type 7
MedGen UID:
43108
Concept ID:
C0085132
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS7) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease characterized by the inability to degrade glucuronic acid-containing glycosaminoglycans. The phenotype is highly variable, ranging from severe lethal hydrops fetalis to mild forms with survival into adulthood. Most patients with the intermediate phenotype show hepatomegaly, skeletal anomalies, coarse facies, and variable degrees of mental impairment (Shipley et al., 1993). MPS VII was the first autosomal mucopolysaccharidosis for which chromosomal assignment was achieved.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-I-H/S
MedGen UID:
88566
Concept ID:
C0086431
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-A
MedGen UID:
39264
Concept ID:
C0086647
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disease characterized by progressive central nervous system degeneration manifest as severe intellectual disability (ID), developmental regression, and other neurologic manifestations including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), behavioral problems, and sleep disturbances. Disease onset is typically before age ten years. Disease course may be rapidly or slowly progressive; some individuals with an extremely attenuated disease course present in mid-to-late adulthood with early-onset dementia with or without a history of ID. Systemic manifestations can include musculoskeletal problems (joint stiffness, contractures, scoliosis, and hip dysplasia), hearing loss, respiratory tract and sinopulmonary infections, and cardiac disease (valvular thickening, defects in the cardiac conduction system). Neurologic decline is seen in all affected individuals; however, clinical severity varies within and among the four MPS III subtypes (defined by the enzyme involved) and even among members of the same family. Death usually occurs in the second or third decade of life secondary to neurologic regression or respiratory tract infections.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-B
MedGen UID:
88601
Concept ID:
C0086648
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disease characterized by progressive central nervous system degeneration manifest as severe intellectual disability (ID), developmental regression, and other neurologic manifestations including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), behavioral problems, and sleep disturbances. Disease onset is typically before age ten years. Disease course may be rapidly or slowly progressive; some individuals with an extremely attenuated disease course present in mid-to-late adulthood with early-onset dementia with or without a history of ID. Systemic manifestations can include musculoskeletal problems (joint stiffness, contractures, scoliosis, and hip dysplasia), hearing loss, respiratory tract and sinopulmonary infections, and cardiac disease (valvular thickening, defects in the cardiac conduction system). Neurologic decline is seen in all affected individuals; however, clinical severity varies within and among the four MPS III subtypes (defined by the enzyme involved) and even among members of the same family. Death usually occurs in the second or third decade of life secondary to neurologic regression or respiratory tract infections.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-C
MedGen UID:
39477
Concept ID:
C0086649
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disease characterized by progressive central nervous system degeneration manifest as severe intellectual disability (ID), developmental regression, and other neurologic manifestations including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), behavioral problems, and sleep disturbances. Disease onset is typically before age ten years. Disease course may be rapidly or slowly progressive; some individuals with an extremely attenuated disease course present in mid-to-late adulthood with early-onset dementia with or without a history of ID. Systemic manifestations can include musculoskeletal problems (joint stiffness, contractures, scoliosis, and hip dysplasia), hearing loss, respiratory tract and sinopulmonary infections, and cardiac disease (valvular thickening, defects in the cardiac conduction system). Neurologic decline is seen in all affected individuals; however, clinical severity varies within and among the four MPS III subtypes (defined by the enzyme involved) and even among members of the same family. Death usually occurs in the second or third decade of life secondary to neurologic regression or respiratory tract infections.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-D
MedGen UID:
88602
Concept ID:
C0086650
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disease characterized by progressive central nervous system degeneration manifest as severe intellectual disability (ID), developmental regression, and other neurologic manifestations including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), behavioral problems, and sleep disturbances. Disease onset is typically before age ten years. Disease course may be rapidly or slowly progressive; some individuals with an extremely attenuated disease course present in mid-to-late adulthood with early-onset dementia with or without a history of ID. Systemic manifestations can include musculoskeletal problems (joint stiffness, contractures, scoliosis, and hip dysplasia), hearing loss, respiratory tract and sinopulmonary infections, and cardiac disease (valvular thickening, defects in the cardiac conduction system). Neurologic decline is seen in all affected individuals; however, clinical severity varies within and among the four MPS III subtypes (defined by the enzyme involved) and even among members of the same family. Death usually occurs in the second or third decade of life secondary to neurologic regression or respiratory tract infections.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-IV-A
MedGen UID:
43375
Concept ID:
C0086651
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is a continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressive early-onset form to a slowly progressive later-onset form. Children with MPS IVA typically have no distinctive clinical findings at birth. The severe form is usually apparent between ages one and three years, often first manifesting as kyphoscoliosis, genu valgum (knock-knee), and pectus carinatum; the slowly progressive form may not become evident until late childhood or adolescence, often first manifesting as hip problems (pain, stiffness, and Legg Perthes disease). Progressive bone and joint involvement leads to short stature, and eventually to disabling pain and arthritis. Involvement of other organ systems can lead to significant morbidity, including respiratory compromise, obstructive sleep apnea, valvular heart disease, hearing impairment, visual impairment from corneal clouding, dental abnormalities, and hepatomegaly. Compression of the spinal cord is a common complication that results in neurologic impairment. Children with MPS IVA have normal intellectual abilities at the outset of the disease.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-IV-B
MedGen UID:
43376
Concept ID:
C0086652
Disease or Syndrome
GLB1-related disorders comprise two phenotypically distinct lysosomal storage disorders: GM1 gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis type IVB (MPS IVB). The phenotype of GM1 gangliosidosis constitutes a spectrum ranging from severe (infantile) to intermediate (late-infantile and juvenile) to mild (chronic/adult). Type I (infantile) GM1 gangliosidosis begins before age 12 months. Prenatal manifestations may include nonimmune hydrops fetalis, intrauterine growth restriction, and placental vacuolization; congenital dermal melanocytosis (Mongolian spots) may be observed. Macular cherry-red spot is detected on eye exam. Progressive central nervous system dysfunction leads to spasticity and rapid regression; blindness, deafness, decerebrate rigidity, seizures, feeding difficulties, and oral secretions are observed. Life expectancy is two to three years. Type II can be subdivided into the late-infantile (onset age 1-3 years) and juvenile (onset age 3-10 years) phenotypes. Central nervous system dysfunction manifests as progressive cognitive, motor, and speech decline as measured by psychometric testing. There may be mild corneal clouding, hepatosplenomegaly, and/or cardiomyopathy; the typical course is characterized by progressive neurologic decline, progressive skeletal disease in some individuals (including kyphosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral heads), and progressive feeding difficulties leading to aspiration risk. Type III begins in late childhood to the third decade with generalized dystonia leading to unsteady gait and speech disturbance followed by extrapyramidal signs including akinetic-rigid parkinsonism. Cardiomyopathy develops in some and skeletal involvement occurs in most. Intellectual impairment is common late in the disease with prognosis directly related to the degree of neurologic impairment. MPS IVB is characterized by skeletal dysplasia with specific findings of axial and appendicular dysostosis multiplex, short stature (below 15th centile in adults), kyphoscoliosis, coxa/genu valga, joint laxity, platyspondyly, and odontoid hypoplasia. First signs and symptoms may be apparent at birth. Bony involvement is progressive, with more than 84% of adults requiring ambulation aids; life span does not appear to be limited. Corneal clouding is detected in some individuals and cardiac valvular disease may develop.
Hurler syndrome
MedGen UID:
39698
Concept ID:
C0086795
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common.
Aspartylglucosaminuria
MedGen UID:
78649
Concept ID:
C0268225
Disease or Syndrome
Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is a severe autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that involves the central nervous system and causes skeletal abnormalities as well as connective tissue lesions. The most characteristic feature is progressive mental retardation. The disorder is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glycosylasparaginase, which results in body fluid and tissue accumulation of a series of glycoasparagines, i.e., glycoconjugates with an aspartylglucosamine moiety at the reducing end. AGU belongs to the group of disorders commonly referred to as the Finnish disease heritage (summary by Mononen et al., 1993 and Arvio and Arvio, 2002).
Combined deficiency of sialidase AND beta galactosidase
MedGen UID:
82779
Concept ID:
C0268233
Disease or Syndrome
Galactosialidosis (GSL) is a lysosomal storage disease associated with a combined deficiency of beta-galactosidase (611458) and neuraminidase (608272), secondary to a defect in protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). All patients have clinical manifestations typical of a lysosomal disorder, such as coarse facies, cherry red spots, vertebral changes, foam cells in the bone marrow, and vacuolated lymphocytes. Three phenotypic subtypes are recognized. The early infantile form is associated with fetal hydrops, edema, ascites, visceromegaly, skeletal dysplasia, and early death. The late infantile type is characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, growth retardation, cardiac involvement, and rare occurrence of neurologic signs. The juvenile/adult form is characterized by myoclonus, ataxia, angiokeratoma, mental retardation, neurologic deterioration, absence of visceromegaly, and long survival. The majority of reported patients belong to the juvenile/adult group and are mainly of Japanese origin (summary by d'Azzo et al., 2001).
Multiple sulfatase deficiency
MedGen UID:
75664
Concept ID:
C0268263
Disease or Syndrome
Initial symptoms of multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) can develop from infancy through early childhood, and presentation is widely variable. Some individuals display the multisystemic features characteristic of mucopolysaccharidosis disorders (e.g., developmental regression, organomegaly, skeletal deformities) while other individuals present primarily with neurologic regression (associated with leukodystrophy). Based on age of onset, rate of progression, and disease severity, several different clinical subtypes of MSD have been described: Neonatal MSD is the most severe with presentation in the prenatal period or at birth with rapid progression and death occurring within the first two years of life. Infantile MSD is the most common variant and may be characterized as attenuated (slower clinical course with cognitive disability and neurodegeneration identified in the 2nd year of life) or severe (loss of the majority of developmental milestones by age 5 years). Juvenile MSD is the rarest subtype with later onset of symptoms and subacute clinical presentation. Many of the features found in MSD are progressive, including neurologic deterioration, heart disease, hearing loss, and airway compromise.
Infantile GM1 gangliosidosis
MedGen UID:
75665
Concept ID:
C0268271
Disease or Syndrome
GLB1-related disorders comprise two phenotypically distinct lysosomal storage disorders: GM1 gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis type IVB (MPS IVB). The phenotype of GM1 gangliosidosis constitutes a spectrum ranging from severe (infantile) to intermediate (late-infantile and juvenile) to mild (chronic/adult). Type I (infantile) GM1 gangliosidosis begins before age 12 months. Prenatal manifestations may include nonimmune hydrops fetalis, intrauterine growth restriction, and placental vacuolization; congenital dermal melanocytosis (Mongolian spots) may be observed. Macular cherry-red spot is detected on eye exam. Progressive central nervous system dysfunction leads to spasticity and rapid regression; blindness, deafness, decerebrate rigidity, seizures, feeding difficulties, and oral secretions are observed. Life expectancy is two to three years. Type II can be subdivided into the late-infantile (onset age 1-3 years) and juvenile (onset age 3-10 years) phenotypes. Central nervous system dysfunction manifests as progressive cognitive, motor, and speech decline as measured by psychometric testing. There may be mild corneal clouding, hepatosplenomegaly, and/or cardiomyopathy; the typical course is characterized by progressive neurologic decline, progressive skeletal disease in some individuals (including kyphosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral heads), and progressive feeding difficulties leading to aspiration risk. Type III begins in late childhood to the third decade with generalized dystonia leading to unsteady gait and speech disturbance followed by extrapyramidal signs including akinetic-rigid parkinsonism. Cardiomyopathy develops in some and skeletal involvement occurs in most. Intellectual impairment is common late in the disease with prognosis directly related to the degree of neurologic impairment. MPS IVB is characterized by skeletal dysplasia with specific findings of axial and appendicular dysostosis multiplex, short stature (below 15th centile in adults), kyphoscoliosis, coxa/genu valga, joint laxity, platyspondyly, and odontoid hypoplasia. First signs and symptoms may be apparent at birth. Bony involvement is progressive, with more than 84% of adults requiring ambulation aids; life span does not appear to be limited. Corneal clouding is detected in some individuals and cardiac valvular disease may develop.
GM1 gangliosidosis type 2
MedGen UID:
120625
Concept ID:
C0268272
Disease or Syndrome
GLB1-related disorders comprise two phenotypically distinct lysosomal storage disorders: GM1 gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis type IVB (MPS IVB). The phenotype of GM1 gangliosidosis constitutes a spectrum ranging from severe (infantile) to intermediate (late-infantile and juvenile) to mild (chronic/adult). Type I (infantile) GM1 gangliosidosis begins before age 12 months. Prenatal manifestations may include nonimmune hydrops fetalis, intrauterine growth restriction, and placental vacuolization; congenital dermal melanocytosis (Mongolian spots) may be observed. Macular cherry-red spot is detected on eye exam. Progressive central nervous system dysfunction leads to spasticity and rapid regression; blindness, deafness, decerebrate rigidity, seizures, feeding difficulties, and oral secretions are observed. Life expectancy is two to three years. Type II can be subdivided into the late-infantile (onset age 1-3 years) and juvenile (onset age 3-10 years) phenotypes. Central nervous system dysfunction manifests as progressive cognitive, motor, and speech decline as measured by psychometric testing. There may be mild corneal clouding, hepatosplenomegaly, and/or cardiomyopathy; the typical course is characterized by progressive neurologic decline, progressive skeletal disease in some individuals (including kyphosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral heads), and progressive feeding difficulties leading to aspiration risk. Type III begins in late childhood to the third decade with generalized dystonia leading to unsteady gait and speech disturbance followed by extrapyramidal signs including akinetic-rigid parkinsonism. Cardiomyopathy develops in some and skeletal involvement occurs in most. Intellectual impairment is common late in the disease with prognosis directly related to the degree of neurologic impairment. MPS IVB is characterized by skeletal dysplasia with specific findings of axial and appendicular dysostosis multiplex, short stature (below 15th centile in adults), kyphoscoliosis, coxa/genu valga, joint laxity, platyspondyly, and odontoid hypoplasia. First signs and symptoms may be apparent at birth. Bony involvement is progressive, with more than 84% of adults requiring ambulation aids; life span does not appear to be limited. Corneal clouding is detected in some individuals and cardiac valvular disease may develop.
GNPTG-mucolipidosis
MedGen UID:
340743
Concept ID:
C1854896
Disease or Syndrome
Mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III?) is a slowly progressive inborn error of metabolism mainly affecting skeletal, joint, and connective tissues. Clinical onset is in early childhood; the progressive course results in severe functional impairment and significant morbidity from chronic pain. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease from thoracic involvement, and thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves) are rarely clinically significant. A few (probably <10%) affected individuals display mild cognitive impairment.
Sialidosis type 2
MedGen UID:
924303
Concept ID:
C4282398
Disease or Syndrome
Sialidosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the progressive lysosomal storage of sialylated glycopeptides and oligosaccharides caused by a deficiency of the enzyme neuraminidase. Common to the sialidoses is the accumulation and/or excretion of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) covalently linked ('bound') to a variety of oligosaccharides and/or glycoproteins (summary by Lowden and O'Brien, 1979). The sialidoses are distinct from the sialurias in which there is storage and excretion of 'free' sialic acid, rather than 'bound' sialic acid; neuraminidase activity in sialuria is normal or elevated. Salla disease (604369) is a form of 'free' sialic acid disease. Classification Lowden and O'Brien (1979) provided a logical nosology of neuraminidase deficiency into sialidosis type I and type II. Type I is the milder form, also known as the 'normosomatic' type or the cherry red spot-myoclonus syndrome. Sialidosis type II is the more severe form with an earlier onset, and is also known as the 'dysmorphic' type. Type II has been subdivided into juvenile and infantile forms. Other terms for sialidosis type II are mucolipidosis I and lipomucopolysaccharidosis.
Mucopolysaccharidosis-plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
934594
Concept ID:
C4310627
Disease or Syndrome
MPSPS is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting in a multisystem disorder with features of the mucopolysaccharidosis lysosomal storage diseases (see, e.g., 607016). Patients present in infancy or early childhood with respiratory difficulties, cardiac problems, anemia, dysostosis multiplex, renal involvement, coarse facies, and delayed psychomotor development. Most patients die of cardiorespiratory failure in the first years of life (summary by Kondo et al., 2017).
Dysostosis multiplex, Ain-Naz type
MedGen UID:
1780944
Concept ID:
C5444223
Disease or Syndrome
The Ain-Naz type of dysostosis multiplex (DMAN) is a severe progressive skeletal dysplasia with features of a metabolic disorder. Patients exhibit marked short stature, coarse facies with broad nose and prominent lips, and a distended abdomen, and experience severe physical disability. Early death has been observed in some patients (Ain et al., 2021).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Bosfield K, Regier DS, Viall S, Hicks R, Shur N, Grant CL
Am J Med Genet A 2021 Jan;185(1):134-140. Epub 2020 Oct 24 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.61930. PMID: 33098355
Arunkumar N, Langan TJ, Stapleton M, Kubaski F, Mason RW, Singh R, Kobayashi H, Yamaguchi S, Suzuki Y, Orii K, Orii T, Fukao T, Tomatsu S
J Hum Genet 2020 Jul;65(7):557-567. Epub 2020 Apr 10 doi: 10.1038/s10038-020-0744-8. PMID: 32277174
D'Avanzo F, Rigon L, Zanetti A, Tomanin R
Int J Mol Sci 2020 Feb 13;21(4) doi: 10.3390/ijms21041258. PMID: 32070051Free PMC Article

Curated

American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Newborn Screening ACT Sheet, alpha-L-iduronidase deficiency with or without glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation, Mucopolysaccharidosis Type 1 (MPS I), 2023

ACMG Algorithm, MPS I: Decreased Alpha-L-Iduronidase; Elevated Dermatan and Heparan Sulfates, 2023

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Gentner B, Tucci F, Galimberti S, Fumagalli F, De Pellegrin M, Silvani P, Camesasca C, Pontesilli S, Darin S, Ciotti F, Sarzana M, Consiglieri G, Filisetti C, Forni G, Passerini L, Tomasoni D, Cesana D, Calabria A, Spinozzi G, Cicalese MP, Calbi V, Migliavacca M, Barzaghi F, Ferrua F, Gallo V, Miglietta S, Zonari E, Cheruku PS, Forni C, Facchini M, Corti A, Gabaldo M, Zancan S, Gasperini S, Rovelli A, Boelens JJ, Jones SA, Wynn R, Baldoli C, Montini E, Gregori S, Ciceri F, Valsecchi MG, la Marca G, Parini R, Naldini L, Aiuti A, Bernardo ME; MPSI Study Group
N Engl J Med 2021 Nov 18;385(21):1929-1940. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2106596. PMID: 34788506
Barone R, Pellico A, Pittalà A, Gasperini S
Ital J Pediatr 2018 Nov 16;44(Suppl 2):121. doi: 10.1186/s13052-018-0561-2. PMID: 30442188Free PMC Article
Nicolas-Jilwan M, AlSayed M
Pediatr Radiol 2018 Sep;48(10):1503-1520. Epub 2018 May 11 doi: 10.1007/s00247-018-4139-3. PMID: 29752520
Kiely BT, Kohler JL, Coletti HY, Poe MD, Escolar ML
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2017 Feb 14;12(1):32. doi: 10.1186/s13023-017-0583-7. PMID: 28193245Free PMC Article
Wraith JE
Handb Clin Neurol 2013;113:1723-9. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-59565-2.00042-3. PMID: 23622395

Diagnosis

Hampe CS, Wesley J, Lund TC, Orchard PJ, Polgreen LE, Eisengart JB, McLoon LK, Cureoglu S, Schachern P, McIvor RS
Biomolecules 2021 Jan 29;11(2) doi: 10.3390/biom11020189. PMID: 33572941Free PMC Article
D'Avanzo F, Rigon L, Zanetti A, Tomanin R
Int J Mol Sci 2020 Feb 13;21(4) doi: 10.3390/ijms21041258. PMID: 32070051Free PMC Article
Barone R, Pellico A, Pittalà A, Gasperini S
Ital J Pediatr 2018 Nov 16;44(Suppl 2):121. doi: 10.1186/s13052-018-0561-2. PMID: 30442188Free PMC Article
Nannini V
Atlas Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2014 Sep;22(2):123-34. doi: 10.1016/j.cxom.2014.05.005. PMID: 25171994
Wraith JE
Handb Clin Neurol 2013;113:1723-9. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-59565-2.00042-3. PMID: 23622395

Therapy

Gentner B, Tucci F, Galimberti S, Fumagalli F, De Pellegrin M, Silvani P, Camesasca C, Pontesilli S, Darin S, Ciotti F, Sarzana M, Consiglieri G, Filisetti C, Forni G, Passerini L, Tomasoni D, Cesana D, Calabria A, Spinozzi G, Cicalese MP, Calbi V, Migliavacca M, Barzaghi F, Ferrua F, Gallo V, Miglietta S, Zonari E, Cheruku PS, Forni C, Facchini M, Corti A, Gabaldo M, Zancan S, Gasperini S, Rovelli A, Boelens JJ, Jones SA, Wynn R, Baldoli C, Montini E, Gregori S, Ciceri F, Valsecchi MG, la Marca G, Parini R, Naldini L, Aiuti A, Bernardo ME; MPSI Study Group
N Engl J Med 2021 Nov 18;385(21):1929-1940. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2106596. PMID: 34788506
Jameson E, Jones S, Remmington T
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016 Apr 1;4:CD009354. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009354.pub4. PMID: 27033167
Prasad VK, Kurtzberg J
Semin Hematol 2010 Jan;47(1):59-69. doi: 10.1053/j.seminhematol.2009.10.008. PMID: 20109613
Wraith EJ, Hopwood JJ, Fuller M, Meikle PJ, Brooks DA
BioDrugs 2005;19(1):1-7. doi: 10.2165/00063030-200519010-00001. PMID: 15691212
BioDrugs 2002;16(4):316-8. doi: 10.2165/00063030-200216040-00009. PMID: 12196045

Prognosis

Pillai NR, Ahmed A, Vanyo T, Whitley CB
Genes (Basel) 2022 Jul 22;13(8) doi: 10.3390/genes13081293. PMID: 35893030Free PMC Article
Gentner B, Tucci F, Galimberti S, Fumagalli F, De Pellegrin M, Silvani P, Camesasca C, Pontesilli S, Darin S, Ciotti F, Sarzana M, Consiglieri G, Filisetti C, Forni G, Passerini L, Tomasoni D, Cesana D, Calabria A, Spinozzi G, Cicalese MP, Calbi V, Migliavacca M, Barzaghi F, Ferrua F, Gallo V, Miglietta S, Zonari E, Cheruku PS, Forni C, Facchini M, Corti A, Gabaldo M, Zancan S, Gasperini S, Rovelli A, Boelens JJ, Jones SA, Wynn R, Baldoli C, Montini E, Gregori S, Ciceri F, Valsecchi MG, la Marca G, Parini R, Naldini L, Aiuti A, Bernardo ME; MPSI Study Group
N Engl J Med 2021 Nov 18;385(21):1929-1940. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2106596. PMID: 34788506
Kiely BT, Kohler JL, Coletti HY, Poe MD, Escolar ML
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2017 Feb 14;12(1):32. doi: 10.1186/s13023-017-0583-7. PMID: 28193245Free PMC Article
Prasad VK, Kurtzberg J
Semin Hematol 2010 Jan;47(1):59-69. doi: 10.1053/j.seminhematol.2009.10.008. PMID: 20109613
Wraith EJ, Hopwood JJ, Fuller M, Meikle PJ, Brooks DA
BioDrugs 2005;19(1):1-7. doi: 10.2165/00063030-200519010-00001. PMID: 15691212

Clinical prediction guides

Gentner B, Tucci F, Galimberti S, Fumagalli F, De Pellegrin M, Silvani P, Camesasca C, Pontesilli S, Darin S, Ciotti F, Sarzana M, Consiglieri G, Filisetti C, Forni G, Passerini L, Tomasoni D, Cesana D, Calabria A, Spinozzi G, Cicalese MP, Calbi V, Migliavacca M, Barzaghi F, Ferrua F, Gallo V, Miglietta S, Zonari E, Cheruku PS, Forni C, Facchini M, Corti A, Gabaldo M, Zancan S, Gasperini S, Rovelli A, Boelens JJ, Jones SA, Wynn R, Baldoli C, Montini E, Gregori S, Ciceri F, Valsecchi MG, la Marca G, Parini R, Naldini L, Aiuti A, Bernardo ME; MPSI Study Group
N Engl J Med 2021 Nov 18;385(21):1929-1940. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2106596. PMID: 34788506
Williams IM, Pineda R, Neerukonda VK, Stagner AM
Am J Ophthalmol 2021 Nov;231:39-47. Epub 2021 May 26 doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2021.05.014. PMID: 34048802
Barone R, Pellico A, Pittalà A, Gasperini S
Ital J Pediatr 2018 Nov 16;44(Suppl 2):121. doi: 10.1186/s13052-018-0561-2. PMID: 30442188Free PMC Article
Kiely BT, Kohler JL, Coletti HY, Poe MD, Escolar ML
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2017 Feb 14;12(1):32. doi: 10.1186/s13023-017-0583-7. PMID: 28193245Free PMC Article
Wraith EJ, Hopwood JJ, Fuller M, Meikle PJ, Brooks DA
BioDrugs 2005;19(1):1-7. doi: 10.2165/00063030-200519010-00001. PMID: 15691212

Recent systematic reviews

Jameson E, Jones S, Remmington T
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2019 Jun 18;6(6):CD009354. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009354.pub5. PMID: 31211405Free PMC Article
Jameson E, Jones S, Remmington T
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016 Apr 1;4:CD009354. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009354.pub4. PMID: 27033167
Jameson E, Jones S, Wraith JE
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Nov 21;(11):CD009354. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009354.pub3. PMID: 24257962
Jameson E, Jones S, Wraith JE
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Sep 26;(9):CD009354. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009354.pub2. PMID: 24085657

Supplemental Content

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    Clinical resources

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    • PubMed
      See practice and clinical guidelines in PubMed. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.

    Curated

    • ACMG ACT, 2023
      American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Newborn Screening ACT Sheet, alpha-L-iduronidase deficiency with or without glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation, Mucopolysaccharidosis Type 1 (MPS I), 2023
    • ACMG Algorithm, 2023
      ACMG Algorithm, MPS I: Decreased Alpha-L-Iduronidase; Elevated Dermatan and Heparan Sulfates, 2023

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