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Poor head control

MedGen UID:
322809
Concept ID:
C1836038
Finding
HPO: HP:0002421

Definition

Difficulty to maintain correct position of the head while standing or sitting. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVPoor head control

Conditions with this feature

Menkes kinky-hair syndrome
MedGen UID:
44030
Concept ID:
C0022716
Disease or Syndrome
Menkes disease (MNK) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by generalized copper deficiency. The clinical features result from the dysfunction of several copper-dependent enzymes.
Lesch-Nyhan syndrome
MedGen UID:
9721
Concept ID:
C0023374
Disease or Syndrome
HPRT1 disorders, caused by deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt), are typically associated with clinical evidence for overproduction of uric acid (hyperuricemia, nephrolithiasis, and/or gouty arthritis) and varying degrees of neurologic and/or behavioral problems. Historically, three phenotypes were identified in the spectrum of HPRT1 disorders: Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) at the most severe end with motor dysfunction resembling severe cerebral palsy, intellectual disability, and self-injurious behavior; HPRT1-related neurologic dysfunction (HND) in the intermediate range with similar but fewer severe neurologic findings than LND and no self-injurious behavior; and HPRT1-related hyperuricemia (HRH) at the mild end without overt neurologic deficits. It is now recognized that these neurobehavioral phenotypes cluster along a continuum from severe to mild.
Tay-Sachs disease
MedGen UID:
11713
Concept ID:
C0039373
Disease or Syndrome
HEXA disorders are best considered as a disease continuum based on the amount of residual beta-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) enzyme activity. This, in turn, depends on the molecular characteristics and biological impact of the HEXA pathogenic variants. HEX A is necessary for degradation of GM2 ganglioside; without well-functioning enzymes, GM2 ganglioside builds up in the lysosomes of brain and nerve cells. The classic clinical phenotype is known as Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills beginning between ages three and six months, decreased visual attentiveness, and increased or exaggerated startle response with a cherry-red spot observable on the retina followed by developmental plateau and loss of skills after eight to ten months. Seizures are common by 12 months with further deterioration in the second year of life and death occurring between ages two and three years with some survival to five to seven years. Subacute juvenile TSD is associated with normal developmental milestones until age two years, when the emergence of abnormal gait or dysarthria is noted followed by loss of previously acquired skills and cognitive decline. Spasticity, dysphagia, and seizures are present by the end of the first decade of life, with death within the second decade of life, usually by aspiration. Late-onset TSD presents in older teens or young adults with a slowly progressive spectrum of neurologic symptoms including lower-extremity weakness with muscle atrophy, dysarthria, incoordination, tremor, mild spasticity and/or dystonia, and psychiatric manifestations including acute psychosis. Clinical variability even among affected members of the same family is observed in both the subacute juvenile and the late-onset TSD phenotypes.
Werdnig-Hoffmann disease
MedGen UID:
21913
Concept ID:
C0043116
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy resulting from progressive degeneration and irreversible loss of the anterior horn cells in the spinal cord (i.e., lower motor neurons) and the brain stem nuclei. The onset of weakness ranges from before birth to adulthood. The weakness is symmetric, proximal > distal, and progressive. Before the genetic basis of SMA was understood, it was classified into clinical subtypes based on maximum motor function achieved; however, it is now apparent that the phenotype of SMN1-associated SMA spans a continuum without clear delineation of subtypes. With supportive care only, poor weight gain with growth failure, restrictive lung disease, scoliosis, and joint contractures are common complications; however, newly available targeted treatment options are changing the natural history of this disease.
Tay-Sachs disease, variant AB
MedGen UID:
78657
Concept ID:
C0268275
Disease or Syndrome
Acute infantile GM2 activator deficiency is a neurodegenerative disorder in which infants, who are generally normal at birth, have progressive weakness and slowing of developmental progress between ages four and 12 months. An ensuing developmental plateau is followed by progressively rapid developmental regression. By the second year of life decerebrate posturing, difficulty in swallowing, and worsening seizures lead to an unresponsive vegetative state. Death usually occurs between ages two and three years.
Eichsfeld type congenital muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
98047
Concept ID:
C0410180
Disease or Syndrome
Rigid spine muscular dystrophy (RSMD) is a form of congenital muscular dystrophy. Disorders in this group cause muscle weakness and wasting (atrophy) beginning very early in life. In particular, RSMD involves weakness of the muscles of the torso and neck (axial muscles). Other characteristic features include spine stiffness and serious breathing problems.\n\nIn RSMD, muscle weakness is often apparent at birth or within the first few months of life. Affected infants can have poor head control and weak muscle tone (hypotonia), which may delay the development of motor skills such as crawling or walking. Over time, muscles surrounding the spine atrophy, and the joints of the spine develop deformities called contractures that restrict movement. The neck and back become stiff and rigid, and affected children have limited ability to move their heads up and down or side to side. Affected children eventually develop an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis). In some people with RSMD, muscles in the inner thighs also atrophy, although it does not impair the ability to walk.\n\nA characteristic feature of RSMD is breathing difficulty (respiratory insufficiency) due to restricted movement of the torso and weakness of the diaphragm, which is the muscle that separates the abdomen from the chest cavity. The breathing problems, which tend to occur only at night, can be life-threatening. Many affected individuals require a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation) during sleep.\n\nThe combination of features characteristic of RSMD, particularly axial muscle weakness, spine rigidity, and respiratory insufficiency, is sometimes referred to as rigid spine syndrome. While these features occur on their own in RSMD, they can also occur along with additional signs and symptoms in other muscle disorders. The features of rigid spine syndrome typically appear at a younger age in people with RSMD than in those with other muscle disorders.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
162912
Concept ID:
C0796126
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
CEDNIK syndrome
MedGen UID:
332113
Concept ID:
C1836033
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebral dysgenesis, neuropathy, ichthyosis, and keratoderma syndrome (CEDNIK) refers to a unique constellation of clinical manifestations including global developmental delay with hypotonia, roving eye movements or nystagmus, poor motor skills, and impaired intellectual development with speech delay. More variable features include microcephaly, feeding difficulties, seizures, ocular anomalies, hearing loss, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features. Palmoplantar keratoderma and ichthyosis or neuropathy develop in some patients. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows varying degrees of cerebral dysgenesis, including absence of the corpus callosum and cortical dysplasia, as well as hypomyelination, white matter loss, and white matter signal anomalies suggestive of a leukodystrophy. Some patients may show developmental regression; many die in childhood (Fuchs-Telem et al., 2011; Mah-Som et al., 2021). With more patients being reported, several authors (Diggle et al., 2017; Llaci et al., 2019; Mah-Som et al., 2021) have observed that the dermatologic features and peripheral neuropathy show reduced penetrance and are more variable manifestations of this disorder, as they are not observed in all patients with biallelic SNAP29 mutations.
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 2
MedGen UID:
325157
Concept ID:
C1837355
Disease or Syndrome
Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease 1 (PMLD1) is a slowly progressive leukodystrophy that typically presents during the neonatal or early-infantile period with nystagmus, commonly associated with hypotonia, delayed acquisition of motor milestones, speech delay, and dysarthria. Over time the hypotonia typically evolves into spasticity that affects the ability to walk and communicate. Cerebellar signs (gait ataxia, dysmetria, intention tremor, head titubation, and dysdiadochokinesia) frequently manifest during childhood. Some individuals develop extrapyramidal movement abnormalities (choreoathetosis and dystonia). Hearing loss and optic atrophy are observed in rare cases. Motor impairments can lead to swallowing difficulty and orthopedic complications, including hip dislocation and scoliosis. Most individuals have normal cognitive skills or mild intellectual disability – which, however, can be difficult to evaluate in the context of profound motor impairment.
Mitochondrial complex I deficiency
MedGen UID:
374101
Concept ID:
C1838979
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated complex I deficiency is a rare inborn error of metabolism due to mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial genes encoding subunits or assembly factors of the human mitochondrial complex I (NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase) and is characterized by a wide range of manifestations including marked and often fatal lactic acidosis, cardiomyopathy, leukoencephalopathy, pure myopathy and hepatopathy with tubulopathy. Among the numerous clinical phenotypes observed are Leigh syndrome, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and MELAS syndrome (see these terms).
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 3
MedGen UID:
334225
Concept ID:
C1842687
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by an abnormally small cerebellum and brainstem. Clinical features vary, but usually include severe developmental delay, dysmorphic features, seizures, and early death (summary by Durmaz et al., 2009). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1 (607596).
Saldino-Mainzer syndrome
MedGen UID:
341455
Concept ID:
C1849437
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
Sulfite oxidase deficiency due to molybdenum cofactor deficiency type C
MedGen UID:
340761
Concept ID:
C1854990
Disease or Syndrome
Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) represents a spectrum, with some individuals experiencing significant signs and symptoms in the neonatal period and early infancy (termed early-onset or severe MoCD) and others developing signs and symptoms in childhood or adulthood (termed late-onset or mild MoCD). Individuals with early-onset MoCD typically present in the first days of life with severe encephalopathy, including refractory seizures, opisthotonos, axial and appendicular hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and apnea. Head imaging may demonstrate loss of gray and white matter differentiation, gyral swelling, sulci injury (typically assessed by evaluating the depth of focal lesional injury within the sulci), diffusely elevated T2-weighted signal, and panlobar diffusion restriction throughout the forebrain and midbrain with relative sparring of the brain stem. Prognosis for early-onset MoCD is poor, with about 75% succumbing in infancy to secondary complications of their neurologic disability (i.e., pneumonia). Late-onset MoCD is typically characterized by milder symptoms, such as acute neurologic decompensation in the setting of infection. Episodes vary in nature but commonly consist of altered mental status, dystonia, choreoathetosis, ataxia, nystagmus, and fluctuating hypotonia and hypertonia. These features may improve after resolution of the inciting infection or progress in a gradual or stochastic manner over the lifetime. Brain imaging may be normal or may demonstrate T2-weighted hyperintense or cystic lesions in the globus pallidus, thinning of the corpus callosum, and cerebellar atrophy.
NDE1-related microhydranencephaly
MedGen UID:
341899
Concept ID:
C1857977
Disease or Syndrome
Microhydranencephaly (MHAC) is a severe neurodevelopmental defect characterized by extreme microcephaly, profound motor and mental retardation, spasticity, and incomplete cerebral formation. Radiologic studies show gross dilation of the ventricles resulting from the absence of cerebral hemispheres or severe delay in their development, as well as hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, cerebellum, and brainstem (summary by Guven et al., 2012).
Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis 5
MedGen UID:
409627
Concept ID:
C1968603
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis-5 is a form of infantile malignant osteopetrosis, characterized by defective osteoclast function resulting in decreased bone resorption and generalized osteosclerosis. Defective resorption causes development of densely sclerotic fragile bones and progressive obliteration of the marrow spaces and cranial foramina. Marrow obliteration is associated with extramedullary hematopoiesis and hepatosplenomegaly, and results in anemia and thrombocytopenia, whereas nerve entrapment accounts for progressive blindness and hearing loss. Other major manifestations include failure to thrive, pathologic fractures, and increased infection rate. Most affected children succumb to severe bone marrow failure and overwhelming infection in the first few years of life (Quarello et al., 2004).
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6
MedGen UID:
370596
Concept ID:
C1969084
Congenital Abnormality
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by an abnormally small cerebellum and brainstem and associated with severe developmental delay (Edvardson et al., 2007). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1 (607596).
Mucolipidosis type II
MedGen UID:
435914
Concept ID:
C2673377
Disease or Syndrome
GNPTAB-related disorders comprise the phenotypes mucolipidosis II (ML II) and mucolipidosis IIIa/ß (ML IIIa/ß), and phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß. ML II is evident at birth and slowly progressive; death most often occurs in early childhood. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Growth often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. All children have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways, and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. ML IIIa/ß becomes evident at about age three years with slow growth rate and short stature; joint stiffness and pain initially in the shoulders, hips, and fingers; gradual mild coarsening of facial features; and normal to mildly impaired cognitive development. Pain from osteoporosis becomes more severe during adolescence. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease, thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves, left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy) are common causes of death, typically in early to middle adulthood. Phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß are characterized by physical growth in infancy that resembles that of ML II and neuromotor and speech development that resemble that of ML IIIa/ß.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 39
MedGen UID:
414492
Concept ID:
C2751855
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-39 with leukodystrophy (DEE39) is an autosomal recessive neurologic syndrome characterized clinically by global developmental delay apparent in early infancy, early-onset seizures, hypotonia with poor motor function, and hypomyelination on brain imaging. Other features include absent speech and inability to walk; spasticity and hyperreflexia has also been reported. Although there is significant hypomyelination on brain imaging, the disorder was not classified as a primary leukodystrophy. The myelination defect was thought to stem from primary neuronal dysfunction due to impaired mitochondrial transport activity (summary by Wibom et al., 2009 and Falk et al., 2014). However, serial brain imaging in a patient with DEE39 by Kavanaugh et al. (2019) suggested that the mechanism of disease is consistent with a leukoaxonopathy type of leukodystrophy. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A5
MedGen UID:
461763
Concept ID:
C3150413
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Beltran-Valero de Bernabe et al., 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Chromosome 14q11-q22 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
462057
Concept ID:
C3150707
Disease or Syndrome
14q11.2 microdeletion syndrome is a recently described syndrome characterized by developmental delay, hypotonia and facial dysmorphism.
Constitutional megaloblastic anemia with severe neurologic disease
MedGen UID:
462555
Concept ID:
C3151205
Disease or Syndrome
Dihydrofolate reductase deficiency is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the hematologic findings of megaloblastic anemia and variable neurologic symptoms, ranging from severe developmental delay and generalized seizures in infancy (Banka et al., 2011) to childhood absence epilepsy with learning difficulties to lack of symptoms (Cario et al., 2011). Treatment with folinic acid can ameliorate some of the symptoms.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
462826
Concept ID:
C3151476
Disease or Syndrome
SUCLG1-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome, encephalomyopathic form with methylmalonic aciduria is characterized in the majority of affected newborns by hypotonia, muscle atrophy, feeding difficulties, and lactic acidosis. Affected infants commonly manifest developmental delay / cognitive impairment, growth retardation / failure to thrive, hepatopathy, sensorineural hearing impairment, dystonia, and hypertonia. Notable findings in some affected individuals include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, epilepsy, myoclonus, microcephaly, sleep disturbance, rhabdomyolysis, contractures, hypothermia, and/or hypoglycemia. Life span is shortened, with median survival of 20 months.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
482008
Concept ID:
C3280378
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome-2 (MMDS2) with hyperglycinemia is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by developmental regression in infancy. Affected children have an encephalopathic disease course with seizures, spasticity, loss of head control, and abnormal movement. Additional more variable features include optic atrophy, cardiomyopathy, and leukodystrophy. Laboratory studies show increased serum glycine and lactate. Most patients die in childhood. The disorder represents a form of 'variant' nonketotic hyperglycinemia and is distinct from classic nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH, or GCE; 605899), which is characterized by significantly increased CSF glycine. Several forms of 'variant' NKH, including MMDS2, appear to result from defects of mitochondrial lipoate biosynthesis (summary by Baker et al., 2014). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome, see MMDS1 (605711).
MEGF10-related myopathy
MedGen UID:
482309
Concept ID:
C3280679
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-10A (CMYP10A) is a severe autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by generalized hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency, and poor feeding apparent from birth. Decreased fetal movements may be observed. More variable features include high-arched palate, distal joint contractures, foot deformities, scoliosis, areflexia, and dysphagia. Many patients show eventration of the diaphragm. Affected individuals become ventilator-dependent in the first months or years of life and never achieve walking; many die in childhood (Logan et al., 2011). Patients with more damaging mutations in the MEGF10 gene, including nonsense or frameshift null mutations, show the more severe phenotype (CMYP10A), whereas those with missense mutations affecting conserved cysteine residues in the EGF-like domain show the less severe phenotype with later onset of respiratory failure and minicores on muscle biopsy (CMYP10B) (Croci et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliotic and deafness type
MedGen UID:
482790
Concept ID:
C3281160
Disease or Syndrome
FKBP14 kyphoscoliotic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (FKBP14-kEDS) is characterized by congenital muscle hypotonia and weakness (typically improving during childhood), progressive scoliosis, joint hypermobility, hyperelastic skin, gross motor developmental delay, myopathy, and hearing impairment. Most affected children achieve independent walking between ages two and four years. A decline of motor function in adulthood may be seen, but affected individuals are likely to be able to participate in activities of daily living in adulthood and maintain independent walking. Occasional features underlying systemic connective tissue involvement include aortic rupture and arterial dissection, subdural hygroma, insufficiency of cardiac valves, bluish sclerae, bladder diverticula, inguinal or umbilical herniae, and premature rupture of membranes during pregnancy. Rarer findings may include bifid uvula with submucous or frank cleft palate, speech/language delay without true cognitive impairment, and rectal prolapse.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 1
MedGen UID:
483052
Concept ID:
C3463992
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-1 (DEE1) is a severe form of epilepsy characterized by frequent tonic seizures or spasms beginning in infancy with a specific EEG finding of suppression-burst patterns, characterized by high-voltage bursts alternating with almost flat suppression phases. Approximately 75% of DEE1 patients progress to tonic spasms with clustering, arrest of psychomotor development, and hypsarrhythmia on EEG (Kato et al., 2007). DEE1 is part of a phenotypic spectrum of disorders caused by mutation in the ARX gene comprising a nearly continuous series of developmental disorders ranging from lissencephaly (LISX2; 300215) to Proud syndrome (300004) to infantile spasms without brain malformations (DEE) to syndromic (309510) and nonsyndromic (300419) mental retardation. Although males with ARX mutations are often more severely affected, female mutation carriers may also be affected (Kato et al., 2004; Wallerstein et al., 2008). Reviews Deprez et al. (2009) reviewed the genetics of epilepsy syndromes starting in the first year of life and included a diagnostic algorithm. Genetic Heterogeneity of Developmental and Epileptic Encephalopathy Also see DEE2 (300672), caused by mutation in the CDKL5 gene (300203); DEE3 (609304), caused by mutation in the SLC25A22 gene (609302); DEE4 (612164), caused by mutation in the STXBP1 gene (602926); DEE5 (613477), caused by mutation in the SPTAN1 gene (182810); DEE6A (607208), also known as Dravet syndrome, caused by mutation in the SCN1A gene (182389); DEE6B (619317), also caused by mutation in the SCN1A gene; DEE7 (613720), caused by mutation in the KCNQ2 gene (602235); DEE8 (300607), caused by mutation in the ARHGEF9 gene (300429); DEE9 (300088), caused by mutation in the PCDH19 gene (300460); DEE10 (613402), caused by mutation in the PNKP gene (605610); DEE11 (613721), caused by mutation in the SCN2A gene (182390); DEE12 (613722), caused by mutation in the PLCB1 gene (607120); DEE13 (614558), caused by mutation in the SCN8A gene (600702); DEE14 (614959), caused by mutation in the KCNT1 gene (608167); DEE15 (615006), caused by mutation in the ST3GAL3 gene (606494); DEE16 (615338), caused by mutation in the TBC1D24 gene (613577); DEE17 (615473), caused by mutation in the GNAO1 gene (139311); DEE18 (615476), caused by mutation in the SZT2 gene (615463); DEE19 (615744), caused by mutation in the GABRA1 gene (137160); DEE20 (300868), caused by mutation in the PIGA gene (311770); DEE21 (615833), caused by mutation in the NECAP1 gene (611623); DEE22 (300896), caused by mutation in the SLC35A2 gene (314375); DEE23 (615859), caused by mutation in the DOCK7 gene (615730); DEE24 (615871), caused by mutation in the HCN1 gene (602780); DEE25 (615905), caused by mutation in the SLC13A5 gene (608305); DEE26 (616056), caused by mutation in the KCNB1 gene (600397); DEE27 (616139), caused by mutation in the GRIN2B gene (138252); DEE28 (616211), caused by mutation in the WWOX gene (605131); DEE29 (616339), caused by mutation in the AARS gene (601065); DEE30 (616341), caused by mutation in the SIK1 gene (605705); DEE31A (616346) and DEE31B (620352), caused by mutation in the DNM1 gene (602377); DEE32 (616366), caused by mutation in the KCNA2 gene (176262); DEE33 (616409), caused by mutation in the EEF1A2 gene (602959); DEE34 (616645), caused by mutation in the SLC12A5 gene (606726); DEE35 (616647), caused by mutation in the ITPA gene (147520); DEE36 (300884), caused by mutation in the ALG13 gene (300776); DEE37 (616981), caused by mutation in the FRRS1L gene (604574); DEE38 (617020), caused by mutation in the ARV1 gene (611647); DEE39 (612949), caused by mutation in the SLC25A12 gene (603667); DEE40 (617065), caused by mutation in the GUF1 gene (617064); DEE41 (617105), caused by mutation in the SLC1A2 gene (600300); DEE42 (617106), caused by mutation in the CACNA1A gene (601011); DEE43 (617113), caused by mutation in the GABRB3 gene (137192); DEE44 (617132), caused by mutation in the UBA5 gene (610552); DEE45 (617153), caused by mutation in the GABRB1 gene (137190); DEE46 (617162), caused by mutation in the GRIN2D gene (602717); DEE47 (617166), caused by mutation in the FGF12 gene (601513); DEE48 (617276), caused by mutation in the AP3B2 gene (602166); DEE49 (617281), caused by mutation in the DENND5A gene (617278); DEE50 (616457) caused by mutation in the CAD gene (114010); DEE51 (617339), caused by mutation in the MDH2 gene (154100); DEE52 (617350), caused by mutation in the SCN1B gene (600235); DEE53 (617389), caused by mutation in the SYNJ1 gene (604297); DEE54 (617391), caused by mutation in the HNRNPU gene (602869); DEE55 (617599), caused by mutation in the PIGP gene (605938); DEE56 (617665), caused by mutation in the YWHAG gene (605356); DEE57 (617771), caused by mutation in the KCNT2 gene (610044); DEE58 (617830), caused by mutation in the NTRK2 gene (600456); DEE59 (617904), caused by mutation in the GABBR2 gene (607340); DEE60 (617929), caused by mutation in the CNPY3 gene (610774); DEE61 (617933), caused by mutation in the ADAM22 gene (603709); DEE62 (617938), caused by mutation in the SCN3A gene (182391); DEE63 (617976), caused by mutation in the CPLX1 gene (605032); DEE64 (618004), caused by mutation in the RHOBTB2 gene (607352); DEE65 (618008), caused by mutation in the CYFIP2 gene (606323); DEE66 (618067), caused by mutation in the PACS2 gene (610423); DEE67 (618141), caused by mutation in the CUX2 gene (610648); DEE68 (618201), caused by mutation in the TRAK1 gene (608112); DEE69 (618285), caused by mutation in the CACNA1E gene (601013); DEE70 (618298) caused by mutation in the PHACTR1 gene (608723); DEE71 (618328), caused by mutation in the GLS gene (138280); DEE72 (618374), caused by mutation in the NEUROD2 gene (601725); DEE73 (618379), caused by mutation in the RNF13 gene (609247); DEE74 (618396), caused by mutation in the GABRG2 gene (137164); DEE75 (618437), caused by mutation in the PARS2 gene (612036); DEE76 (618468), caused by mutation in the ACTL6B gene (612458); DEE77 (618548), caused by mutation in the PIGQ gene (605754); DEE78 (618557), caused by mutation in the GABRA2 gene (137140); DEE79 (618559), caused by mutation in the GABRA5 gene (137142); DEE80 (618580), caused by mutation in the PIGB gene (604122); DEE81 (618663), caused by mutation in the DMXL2 gene (612186); DEE82 (618721), caused by mutation in the GOT2 gene (138150); DEE83 (618744), caused by mutation in the UGP2 gene (191760); DEE84 (618792), caused by mutation in the UGDH gene (603370); DEE85 (301044), caused by mutation in the SMC1A gene (300040); DEE86 (618910), caused by mutation in the DALRD3 gene (618904); DEE87 (618916), caused by mutation in the CDK19 gene (614720); DEE88 (618959), caused by mutation in the MDH1 gene (152400); DEE89 (619124), caused by mutation in the GAD1 gene (605363); DEE90 (301058), caused by mutation in the FGF13 gene (300070); DEE91 (617711), caused by mutation in the PPP3CA gene (114105); DEE92 (617829), caused by mutation in the GABRB2 gene (600232); DEE93 (618012), caused by mutation in the ATP6V1A gene (607027); DEE94 (615369), caused by mutation in the CHD2 gene (602119); DEE95 (618143), caused by mutation in the PIGS gene (610271); DEE96 (619340), caused by mutation in the NSF gene (601633); DEE97 (619561), caused by mutation in the iCELF2 gene (602538); DEE98 (619605), caused by mutation in the ATP1A2 gene (182340); DEE99 (619606), caused by mutation in the ATP1A3 gene (182350); DEE100 (619777), caused by mutation in the FBXO28 gene (609100); DEE101 (619814), caused by mutation in the GRIN1 gene (138249); DEE102 (619881), caused by mutation in the SLC38A3 gene (604437); DEE103 (619913), caused by mutation in the KCNC2 gene (176256); DEE104 (619970), caused by mutation in the ATP6V0A1 gene (192130); DEE105 (619983), caused by mutation in the HID1 gene (605752); DEE106 (620028), caused by mutation in the UFSP2 gene (611482); DEE107 (620033), caused by mutation in the NAPB gene (
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1B
MedGen UID:
766363
Concept ID:
C3553449
Disease or Syndrome
EXOSC3 pontocerebellar hypoplasia (EXOSC3-PCH) is characterized by abnormalities in the posterior fossa and degeneration of the anterior horn cells. At birth, skeletal muscle weakness manifests as hypotonia (sometimes with congenital joint contractures) and poor feeding. In persons with prolonged survival, spasticity, dystonia, and seizures become evident. Within the first year of life respiratory insufficiency and swallowing difficulties are common. Intellectual disability is severe. Life expectancy ranges from a few weeks to adolescence. To date, 82 individuals (from 58 families) with EXOSC3-PCH have been described.
SLC35A2-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
813018
Concept ID:
C3806688
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIm, or developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-22 (DEE22), is an X-linked dominant severe neurologic disorder characterized by infantile-onset seizures, hypsarrhythmia on EEG, hypotonia, and developmental delay associated with severe intellectual disability and lack of speech. These features are consistent with developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE). Brain malformations usually include cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. Additionally, some patients may have dysmorphic features or coarse facies (Ng et al., 2013; Kodera et al., 2013). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type a, 12
MedGen UID:
815294
Concept ID:
C3808964
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is an autosomal recessive disorder with congenital muscular dystrophy resulting in muscle weakness early in life and brain and eye anomalies. It is usually associated with delayed psychomotor development and shortened life expectancy. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designations Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB). The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as dystroglycanopathies (summary by Stevens et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with intellectual disability), type B14
MedGen UID:
815551
Concept ID:
C3809221
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB14 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by severe muscle weakness apparent in infancy and impaired intellectual development. Some patients may have additional features, such as microcephaly, cardiac dysfunction, seizures, or cerebellar hypoplasia. It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Carss et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 19
MedGen UID:
816385
Concept ID:
C3810055
Disease or Syndrome
Any combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the LYRM4 gene.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
854829
Concept ID:
C3888244
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
SLC39A8-CDG
MedGen UID:
899837
Concept ID:
C4225234
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIn (CDG2N) is an autosomal recessive severe multisystem developmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development apparent from infancy, hypotonia, and variable additional features, such as short stature, seizures, visual impairment, and cerebellar atrophy. Serum transferrin analysis shows a CDG type II pattern (summary by Boycott et al., 2015 and Park et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CDG type II, see CDG2A (212066).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 19
MedGen UID:
897962
Concept ID:
C4225235
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-19 (CMS19) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a defect in the neuromuscular junction, causing generalized muscle weakness, exercise intolerance, and respiratory insufficiency. Patients present with hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and respiratory problems soon after birth, but the severity of the weakness and disease course is variable (summary by Logan et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A9
MedGen UID:
902513
Concept ID:
C4225291
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, and congenital muscular dystrophy. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designation Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), which is associated with death in infancy. The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Geis et al., 2013 and Riemersma et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Microcephaly 15, primary, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
895496
Concept ID:
C4225310
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with progressive microcephaly, spasticity, and brain imaging abnormalities (NEDMISBA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a spectrum of neurologic abnormalities apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals have impaired intellectual development with poor speech, progressive microcephaly, and appendicular spasticity. Brain imaging usually shows abnormalities, including enlarged ventricles, white matter defects, and atrophy or hypoplasia of brain tissue. Some patients have a more severe phenotype with seizures, lack of developmental milestones, and early death (summary by Harel et al., 2018).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 3A
MedGen UID:
898378
Concept ID:
C4225372
Disease or Syndrome
Slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCCMS) is a disorder of the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) characterized by early-onset progressive muscle weakness. The disorder results from kinetic abnormalities of the AChR channel, specifically from prolonged opening and activity of the channel, which causes prolonged synaptic currents resulting in a depolarization block. This is associated with calcium overload, which may contribute to subsequent degeneration of the endplate and postsynaptic membrane. Treatment with quinine, quinidine, or fluoxetine may be helpful; acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and amifampridine should be avoided (summary by Engel et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 2A
MedGen UID:
908185
Concept ID:
C4225374
Disease or Syndrome
Slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCCMS) is a disorder of the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) characterized by early-onset progressive muscle weakness. The disorder results from kinetic abnormalities of the acetylcholine receptor channel, specifically from prolonged opening and activity of the channel, which causes prolonged synaptic currents resulting in a depolarization block. This is associated with calcium overload, which may contribute to subsequent degeneration of the endplate and postsynaptic membrane. Treatment with quinine, quinidine, or fluoxetine may be helpful; cholinesterase inhibitors and amifampridine should be avoided (summary by Engel et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Hypotonia, ataxia, and delayed development syndrome
MedGen UID:
934585
Concept ID:
C4310618
Disease or Syndrome
EBF3 neurodevelopmental disorder (EBF3-NDD) is associated with developmental delay (DD) / intellectual disability (ID), speech delay, gait or truncal ataxia, hypotonia, behavioral problems, and facial dysmorphism. Variability between individuals with EBF3-NDD is significant. Although all affected children have DD noted in early infancy, intellect generally ranges from mild to severe ID, with two individuals functioning in the low normal range. Less common issues can include genitourinary abnormalities and gastrointestinal and/or musculoskeletal involvement. To date, 42 symptomatic individuals from 39 families have been reported.
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 58
MedGen UID:
934608
Concept ID:
C4310641
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Any autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ELP2 gene.
Arthrogryposis, distal, with impaired proprioception and touch
MedGen UID:
934659
Concept ID:
C4310692
Disease or Syndrome
Distal arthrogryposis with impaired proprioception and touch is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by loss of certain mechanosensation modalities resulting in ataxia, difficulty walking, dysmetria, muscle weakness and atrophy, and progressive skeletal contractures. Patients have onset of symptoms in early childhood (summary by Chesler et al., 2016 and Delle Vedove et al., 2016).
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
934713
Concept ID:
C4310746
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 43
MedGen UID:
934738
Concept ID:
C4310771
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
HIVEP2-related intellectual disability is a neurological disorder characterized by moderate to severe developmental delay and intellectual disability and mild physical abnormalities (dysmorphic features). Early symptoms of the condition include weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and delayed development of motor skills, such as sitting, standing, and walking. After learning to walk, many affected individuals continue to have difficulty with this activity; their walking style (gait) is often unbalanced and wide-based. Speech is also delayed, and some people with this condition never learn to talk. Most people with HIVEP2-related intellectual disability also have unusual physical features, such as widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism), a broad nasal bridge, or fingers with tapered ends, although there is no characteristic pattern of such features among affected individuals. Many people with the condition exhibit neurodevelopmental disorders, such as hyperactivity, attention deficit disorder, aggression, anxiety, and autism spectrum disorder, which is a group of developmental disorders characterized by impaired communication and social interaction.\n\nOther features of HIVEP2-related intellectual disability include mild abnormalities in the structure of the brain and an abnormally small brain and head size (microcephaly). Less common health problems include seizures; recurrent ear infections; and eye disorders, such as eyes that do not look in the same direction (strabismus), "lazy eye" (amblyopia), and farsightedness (hyperopia). Some people with HIVEP2-related intellectual disability have gastrointestinal problems, which can include backflow of acidic stomach contents into the esophagus (gastroesophageal reflux) and constipation.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 51
MedGen UID:
1372686
Concept ID:
C4479208
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-51 (DEE51) is an autosomal recessive severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by onset of intractable seizures and hypotonia in the first days or weeks of life. Affected individuals have severely delayed psychomotor development and may show abnormal movements. Brain imaging shows nonspecific abnormalities, such as cerebral atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and delayed myelination. Laboratory studies showed increased lactate, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Ait-El-Mkadem et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with epilepsy, cataracts, feeding difficulties, and delayed brain myelination
MedGen UID:
1377894
Concept ID:
C4479333
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with epilepsy, cataracts, feeding difficulties, and delayed brain myelination is a syndromic form of severe to profound intellectual disability with onset of delayed psychomotor development and seizures in infancy. Affected children have hypotonia, feeding difficulties resulting in failure to thrive, and inability to speak or walk, and they tend to show repetitive stereotypic behaviors. Brain imaging shows cerebral atrophy and delayed myelination (summary by Schoch et al., 2017).
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 1, neurogenic, with myelin defect
MedGen UID:
1373185
Concept ID:
C4479539
Disease or Syndrome
AMC1 is an autosomal recessive severe neurologic disorder with onset in utero. Most affected individuals die in utero or are subject to pregnancy termination because of lack of fetal movements and prenatal evidence of contractures of virtually all joints. Those who survive have generalized contractures and hypotonia. The disorder is caused by a neurogenic defect and poor or absent myelin formation around peripheral nerves rather than by a muscular defect (summary by Xue et al., 2017). <Genetic Heterogeneity of Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita Also see AMC2 (208100), caused by mutation in the ERGIC1 gene (617946); AMC3 (618484), caused by mutation in the SYNE1 gene (608441); AMC4 (618776), caused by mutation in the SCYL2 gene (616365); AMC5 (618947), caused by mutation in the TOR1A gene (605204), and AMC6 (619334), caused by mutation in the NEB gene (161650)
Neurodevelopmental disorder with involuntary movements
MedGen UID:
1374697
Concept ID:
C4479569
Disease or Syndrome
NEDIM is a neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and infantile or childhood onset of hyperkinetic involuntary movements, including chorea and athetosis. The abnormal movements can be severe, sometimes resulting in inability to sit, walk, speak, or eat. Hyperkinetic movements can be exacerbated by specific triggers, such as stress, illness, or high temperature. Some patients have brain abnormalities, such as cerebral atrophy or thin corpus callosum, and some patients may develop seizures (summary by Ananth et al., 2016 and Danti et al., 2017).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, neuropathy, and deafness
MedGen UID:
1382171
Concept ID:
C4479603
Disease or Syndrome
SPTBN4 disorder is typically characterized by severe-to-profound developmental delay and/or intellectual disability, although two individuals in one family had a milder phenotype, including one individual with normal cognitive development. Speech and language skills are often severely limited. Affected individuals rarely achieve head control. Most are unable to sit, stand, or walk. Affected individuals typically have congenital hypotonia that may transition to hypertonia. Axonal motor neuropathy leads to hyporeflexia/areflexia and weakness, which can result in respiratory difficulties requiring ventilatory support. Most affected individuals require tube feeding for nutrition. Half of affected individuals develop seizures. Cortical visual impairment and auditory neuropathy have also been reported.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 55
MedGen UID:
1622363
Concept ID:
C4539843
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-55 (DEE55) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of refractory seizures in the first weeks or months of life. Affected individuals have an extremely poor outcome, with profoundly impaired intellectual development, absent speech, spastic quadriplegia, and dyskinetic movements. Most have cortical visual impairment and require a feeding tube. Brain imaging shows nonspecific abnormalities, including cerebral atrophy, thin corpus callosum, and abnormal signals in the white matter. Death in childhood may occur. Biochemically, the disorder is associated with impaired synthesis of GPI-anchored proteins (summary by Vetro et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 54
MedGen UID:
1614787
Concept ID:
C4540484
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, seizures, and cortical atrophy
MedGen UID:
1615361
Concept ID:
C4540493
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, seizures, and cortical atrophy (NDMSCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe global developmental delay with poor motor and intellectual function apparent soon after birth, as well as postnatal progressive microcephaly. Most patients develop early-onset, frequent, and often intractable seizures, compatible with an epileptic encephalopathy. Other features include poor feeding, poor overall growth, absent speech, poor or absent eye contact, inability to achieve walking, hypotonia, and peripheral spasticity. Brain imaging usually shows progressive cerebral atrophy, thin corpus callosum, and abnormalities in myelination. Death in childhood may occur (summary by Siekierska et al., 2019).
Joubert syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1644883
Concept ID:
C4551568
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 59
MedGen UID:
1633749
Concept ID:
C4693550
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-59 (DEE59) is characterized by severe global developmental delay apparent in infancy with onset of various types of seizures in the first months of life (range 3 to 11 months). The seizures are usually refractory and are often associated with hypsarrhythmia on EEG, although brain imaging is usually normal. More severely affected individuals may be unable to speak or walk, have poor interaction, and require a feeding tube (summary by the EuroEPINOMICS-RES Consortium et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, cataracts, and renal abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1634867
Concept ID:
C4693567
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
1643082
Concept ID:
C4693741
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome-6 is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder with onset in early childhood. Affected individuals may have initial normal development, but show neurologic regression in the first year of life. They have hypotonia, inability to walk, poor speech, intellectual disability, and motor abnormalities, such as ataxia, dystonia, and spasticity. Some patients may die in childhood. Laboratory evidence indicates that the disorder results from mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Vogtle et al., 2018). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome, see MMDS1 (605711).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 63
MedGen UID:
1646846
Concept ID:
C4693810
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-63 (DEE63) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by early-onset refractory infantile spasms and myoclonic seizures in the first months to years of life. Affected individuals have severe to profound developmental delay, often with hypotonia and inability to sit or speak (summary by Redler et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 13
MedGen UID:
1631854
Concept ID:
C4706283
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-13 (COXPD13) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction. Affected individuals develop severe neurologic impairment in the first months of life, including hypotonia, abnormal dystonic movements, hearing loss, poor feeding, global developmental delay, and abnormal eye movements. Brain imaging shows signal abnormalities in putamen, basal ganglia, caudate nuclei, or corpus callosum, as well as delayed myelination. Analysis of patient tissues shows multiple defects in enzymatic activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, although some tissues may show normal values since tissue expression of the mitochondrial defect and metabolic needs of specific tissues are variable (summary by Vedrenne et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Neuropathy, congenital hypomyelinating, 2
MedGen UID:
1648446
Concept ID:
C4722277
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy-2 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by early-onset hypotonia, severely delayed motor development, muscle weakness with areflexia, and severely decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCV) resulting from improper myelination of axons. The severity is variable: some patients may present at birth with contractures and respiratory insufficiency, whereas others may achieve walking (summary by Warner et al., 1996). CHN shows significant phenotypic overlap with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS; 145900), which is also a neuropathy with early onset. Some classify the disorders differently, noting that CHN is characterized by hypo- or amyelination resulting from a congenital defect in myelin formation, whereas DSS has features of continuous myelin breakdown, with demyelination and remyelination (summary by Smit et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CHN, see CHN1 (605253).
Parkinsonism-dystonia, infantile, 2
MedGen UID:
1648382
Concept ID:
C4747991
Disease or Syndrome
PKDYS2 is an autosomal recessive complex infantile-onset neurologic disorder characterized by abnormal movements, including parkinsonism, dystonia, and poor fine motor skills, as well as autonomic dysfunction, including abnormal sweating, cold extremities, and poor sleep. Some patients have variable degrees of developmental delay. Features of the disorder are consistent with decreased levels of monoamine neurotransmitters, although levels of these in the spinal fluid are normal. Preliminary findings indicate that treatment with a dopamine receptor agonist results in dramatic and sustained clinical improvement (summary by Rilstone et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PKDYS, see 613135.
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia, type 1D
MedGen UID:
1648387
Concept ID:
C4748058
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1D (PCH1D) is a severe autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by severe hypotonia and a motor neuronopathy apparent at birth or in infancy. Patients have respiratory insufficiency, feeding difficulties, and severely delayed or minimal gross motor development. Other features may include eye movement abnormalities, poor overall growth, contractures. Brain imaging shows progressive cerebellar atrophy with relative sparing of the brainstem (summary by Burns et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1A (607596).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with spasticity and poor growth
MedGen UID:
1648309
Concept ID:
C4748081
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia 42, early-onset, severe, with neurodevelopmental deficits
MedGen UID:
1648308
Concept ID:
C4748120
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 22
MedGen UID:
1648347
Concept ID:
C4748796
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 28
MedGen UID:
1648493
Concept ID:
C4748827
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 70
MedGen UID:
1648407
Concept ID:
C4749023
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-70 (DEE70) is neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of epileptic spasms or seizures in the first months of life. EEG may show hypsarrhythmia, consistent with a clinical diagnosis of West syndrome. Affected individuals show severely delayed psychomotor development with impaired or absent walking and language skills; intellectual impairment ranges from moderate to severe (summary by Hamada et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 37
MedGen UID:
1675208
Concept ID:
C5193031
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-37 is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder apparent at birth or in the first months of life. Affected individuals have hypotonia, failure to thrive, and neurodegeneration with loss of developmental milestones, as well as liver dysfunction. Some patients may have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, loss of vision and hearing, and/or seizures. Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction is apparent in liver and skeletal muscle tissue. Most patients die in childhood (summary by Zeharia et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Neurodegeneration, early-onset, with choreoathetoid movements and microcytic anemia
MedGen UID:
1676579
Concept ID:
C5193104
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset neurodegeneration with choreoathetoid movements and microcytic anemia (NDCAMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe psychomotor developmental abnormalities, abnormal movements, and functional iron deficiency (Costain et al., 2019).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 77
MedGen UID:
1684735
Concept ID:
C5231405
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome-4 (MCAHS4) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of refractory seizures in the first months of life. Patients have severe global developmental delay, and may have additional variable features, including dysmorphic or coarse facial features, visual defects, and mild skeletal or renal anomalies. At the cellular level, the disorder is caused by a defect in the synthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI), and thus affects the expression of GPI-anchored proteins at the cell surface (summary by Starr et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MCAHS, see MCAHS1 (614080). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 19, transient infantile
MedGen UID:
1684698
Concept ID:
C5231463
Disease or Syndrome
Transient infantile hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-19 (HLD19) is a disorder characterized by onset of transient neurologic abnormalities in early infancy, with resolution within the first or second decades. Affected individuals typically present in the newborn period or in early infancy with nystagmus and motor deficits associated with marked hypomyelination on brain imaging. Both neurologic impairment and abnormal brain imaging spontaneously resolve during childhood. Most patients have normal cognition and can attend regular schools, although some may have persistent neurologic deficits, such as gait ataxia, speech pronunciation defects, and/or mild cognitive impairment (summary by Yan et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Neuromuscular disease and ocular or auditory anomalies with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1684689
Concept ID:
C5231483
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, neonatal respiratory insufficiency, and thermodysregulation
MedGen UID:
1716098
Concept ID:
C5394091
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, neonatal respiratory insufficiency, and thermodysregulation (NEDHRIT) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal respiratory distress, poor feeding, and impaired global development. Affected individuals are unable to walk or speak and have poor or absent eye contact. Some patients may develop seizures (summary by Wagner et al., 2020).
Neurodegeneration, infantile-onset, biotin-responsive
MedGen UID:
1771692
Concept ID:
C5436520
Disease or Syndrome
Sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter deficiency (SMVTD) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic metabolic disorder with highly variable manifestations. Affected individuals usually present at birth or in infancy with severe feeding problems, gastrointestinal reflux, cyclic vomiting, and diarrhea associated with failure to thrive. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage may occur; tube-feeding is often required for a short time. The course and severity of the disease varies: some patients have episodes of acute metabolic decompensation during infection that respond well to treatment, whereas others show more permanent neurologic regression with loss of early motor and cognitive milestones in the first year or so of life. Less severely affected patients have normal development or mild growth and motor delays, whereas more severely affected individuals may have seizures, ataxia, spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, immune defects, and osteopenia. In severely affected patients, brain imaging shows cerebral, cerebellar, and brainstem atrophy and thin corpus callosum. Treatment with biotin, pantothenic acid, and alpha-lipoic acid has been shown to result in significant clinical improvement (Byrne et al., 2019; Hauth et al., 2022).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 50
MedGen UID:
1753519
Concept ID:
C5436623
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 12
MedGen UID:
1745691
Concept ID:
C5436695
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 12 (MC4DN12) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the onset of neurologic dysfunction in early infancy. Affected individuals demonstrate hypotonia with poor head control, profoundly delayed global development with inability to fix and follow, poor overall growth, abnormal spasms or myoclonus, and seizures. Most patients die in the first years of life; those that survive have spastic quadriplegia, feeding difficulties necessitating tube feeding, and profoundly impaired intellectual development with poor or absent communication. More variable features include cortical blindness, nystagmus, scoliosis, and hearing impairment. Brain imaging shows abnormalities consistent with Leigh syndrome (see 256000), as well as cystic cavitation. Laboratory studies show lactic acidosis, increased serum creatine kinase, and decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV (summary by Lim et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 16
MedGen UID:
1762514
Concept ID:
C5436714
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 16 (MC4DN16) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder with highly variable manifestations. Common features include failure to thrive with poor overall growth, short stature, and microcephaly. Some patients additionally have neurologic involvement, including developmental regression with severe hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and seizures. Brain imaging in the more severely affected patients shows cerebral and cerebellar atrophy and abnormal lesions in the basal ganglia. In all cases, patient tissues show variably decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV (summary by Pillai et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Mitochondrial complex 2 deficiency, nuclear type 4
MedGen UID:
1782861
Concept ID:
C5543176
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency nuclear type 4 (MC2DN4) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early-onset progressive neurodegeneration with leukoencephalopathy. Acute episodes of neurodegeneration are often triggered by catabolic stress such as infection or fasting.
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 37
MedGen UID:
1783339
Concept ID:
C5543281
Disease or Syndrome
Onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, impaired intellectual development, and seizures syndrome
MedGen UID:
1788511
Concept ID:
C5543496
Disease or Syndrome
Onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, impaired intellectual development, and seizures syndrome (OORS) is an autosomal recessive syndromic developmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, dysmorphic facial features, and hypoplastic terminal phalanges and nails. Patients have seizures or tonic posturing. The disorder is associated with a defect in GPI anchoring of membrane-bound proteins (summary by Salian et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293). See also DOORS syndrome (220500), which shows some overlapping clinical features.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 97
MedGen UID:
1794209
Concept ID:
C5561999
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-97 (DEE97) is characterized by developmental delay, epileptic encephalopathy, and impaired intellectual development. Other clinical features may include autistic features and hypotonia. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hyperkinetic movements and dyskinesia
MedGen UID:
1794248
Concept ID:
C5562038
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hyperkinetic movements and dyskinesia (NEDHYD) is an autosomal recessive complex neurologic disorder characterized by severe global developmental delay with axial hypotonia, impaired intellectual development, poor overall growth, and abnormal involuntary hyperkinetic movements, including dystonia, myoclonus, spasticity, and orofacial dyskinesia. It is the most severe manifestation of ADCY5-related dyskinetic disorders (summary by Okamoto et al., 2021 and Kaiyrzhanov et al., 2021).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, seizures, and neonatal cholestasis
MedGen UID:
1794262
Concept ID:
C5562052
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, seizures, and neonatal cholestasis (NEDMSC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severely impaired global development apparent from infancy, progressive microcephaly, and neonatal cholestasis manifest as jaundice and elevated liver enzymes. The liver disease resolves, but affected individuals show feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, hypotonia, seizures, hyperkinetic movements, irritability, and poor eye contact or vision, and achieve almost no motor or cognitive developmental milestones. Brain imaging demonstrates agenesis or hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Death in early childhood may occur (summary by Schneeberger et al., 2021).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 101
MedGen UID:
1805172
Concept ID:
C5676955
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-101 (DEE101) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early infantile epileptic encephalopathy and severe global developmental delay (summary by Blakes et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Dentici-Novelli neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1810366
Concept ID:
C5676987
Disease or Syndrome
Dentici-Novelli neurodevelopmental syndrome (DENNED) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development apparent from infancy. The severity of the phenotype is highly variable: more severely affected individuals have axial hypotonia, peripheral spasticity, microcephaly, early-onset seizures, brain imaging abnormalities, and are unable to walk or speak. Those with a less severe phenotype may achieve some developmental goals and show less severe intellectual disability (Dentici et al., 2022).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 103
MedGen UID:
1809962
Concept ID:
C5677002
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-103 (DEE103) is characterized by onset of various types of seizures in the first year of life, most of which are refractory to treatment. Affected individuals show global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development ranging from mild to severe. Additional features may include hypotonia, ataxia, and behavioral abnormalities, including autism and hyperactivity (Schwarz et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Pardanani A
Am J Hematol 2021 Apr 1;96(4):508-525. Epub 2021 Feb 21 doi: 10.1002/ajh.26118. PMID: 33524167
Mitchell RB, Archer SM, Ishman SL, Rosenfeld RM, Coles S, Finestone SA, Friedman NR, Giordano T, Hildrew DM, Kim TW, Lloyd RM, Parikh SR, Shulman ST, Walner DL, Walsh SA, Nnacheta LC
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2019 Feb;160(2):187-205. doi: 10.1177/0194599818807917. PMID: 30921525
Rosenfeld RM, Shin JJ, Schwartz SR, Coggins R, Gagnon L, Hackell JM, Hoelting D, Hunter LL, Kummer AW, Payne SC, Poe DS, Veling M, Vila PM, Walsh SA, Corrigan MD
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2016 Feb;154(1 Suppl):S1-S41. doi: 10.1177/0194599815623467. PMID: 26832942

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Reid SM, McCutcheon J, Reddihough DS, Johnson H
Dev Med Child Neurol 2012 Nov;54(11):1032-6. Epub 2012 Aug 9 doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2012.04382.x. PMID: 22881219
Giannini S, Faldini C, Pagkrati S, Grandi G, Romagnoli M, Merlini L
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2006 Jul 15;31(16):1805-9. doi: 10.1097/01.brs.0000225971.26117.bf. PMID: 16845355
Ravid S, Maytal J, Eviatar L
Pediatr Neurol 2000 Oct;23(4):338-9. doi: 10.1016/s0887-8994(00)00204-6. PMID: 11068167
Waterman ET, Koltai PJ, Downey JC, Cacace AT
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 1992 Jul;24(1):63-71. doi: 10.1016/0165-5876(92)90067-y. PMID: 1399305
Yamaguchi S, Orii T, Yasuda K, Kohno Y
Tohoku J Exp Med 1987 Mar;151(3):293-9. doi: 10.1620/tjem.151.293. PMID: 3590175

Diagnosis

Al-Azzawi SS, Khaksar S, Hadi EK, Agrawal H, Murray I
Sensors (Basel) 2021 Dec 6;21(23) doi: 10.3390/s21238148. PMID: 34884148Free PMC Article
Jędrzejowska M, Potulska-Chromik A, Gos M, Gambin T, Dębek E, Rosiak E, Stępień A, Szymańczak R, Wojtaś B, Gielniewski B, Ciara E, Sobczyńska A, Chrzanowska K, Kostera-Pruszczyk A, Madej-Pilarczyk A
Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2021 May;32:115-121. Epub 2021 Apr 20 doi: 10.1016/j.ejpn.2021.04.005. PMID: 33940562
Malbora B, Avci Z, Ozbek N
Skinmed 2014 Mar-Apr;12(2):117-8. PMID: 24933854
Duffner PK, Barczykowski A, Jalal K, Yan L, Kay DM, Carter RL
Pediatr Neurol 2011 Sep;45(3):141-8. doi: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2011.05.007. PMID: 21824559
Civitello LA
Pediatr Neurosurg 1991-1992;17(2):104-12. doi: 10.1159/000120576. PMID: 1815729

Therapy

Reid SM, Westbury C, Guzys AT, Reddihough DS
Dev Med Child Neurol 2020 Mar;62(3):346-353. Epub 2019 Sep 8 doi: 10.1111/dmcn.14350. PMID: 31495925
Brown JE, Thompson M, Brizzolara K
Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 Apr;30(2):142-148. doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000492. PMID: 29579004
Solsona MD, Fernández LL, Boquet EM, Andrés JL
Clin Neuropharmacol 2012 May-Jun;35(3):150-1. doi: 10.1097/WNF.0b013e3182515c9d. PMID: 22592512
Chieng KS, Hussain N, Gosalakkal JA
Pediatr Neurol 2007 Sep;37(3):215-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2007.04.015. PMID: 17765812
Yamaguchi S, Orii T, Yasuda K, Kohno Y
Tohoku J Exp Med 1987 Mar;151(3):293-9. doi: 10.1620/tjem.151.293. PMID: 3590175

Prognosis

Jędrzejowska M, Potulska-Chromik A, Gos M, Gambin T, Dębek E, Rosiak E, Stępień A, Szymańczak R, Wojtaś B, Gielniewski B, Ciara E, Sobczyńska A, Chrzanowska K, Kostera-Pruszczyk A, Madej-Pilarczyk A
Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2021 May;32:115-121. Epub 2021 Apr 20 doi: 10.1016/j.ejpn.2021.04.005. PMID: 33940562
Reid SM, Westbury C, Guzys AT, Reddihough DS
Dev Med Child Neurol 2020 Mar;62(3):346-353. Epub 2019 Sep 8 doi: 10.1111/dmcn.14350. PMID: 31495925
Malbora B, Avci Z, Ozbek N
Skinmed 2014 Mar-Apr;12(2):117-8. PMID: 24933854
Reid SM, McCutcheon J, Reddihough DS, Johnson H
Dev Med Child Neurol 2012 Nov;54(11):1032-6. Epub 2012 Aug 9 doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2012.04382.x. PMID: 22881219
Gruel CR, Birch JG, Roach JW, Herring JA
J Pediatr Orthop 1986 Nov-Dec;6(6):693-702. doi: 10.1097/01241398-198611000-00009. PMID: 3793891

Clinical prediction guides

Jędrzejowska M, Potulska-Chromik A, Gos M, Gambin T, Dębek E, Rosiak E, Stępień A, Szymańczak R, Wojtaś B, Gielniewski B, Ciara E, Sobczyńska A, Chrzanowska K, Kostera-Pruszczyk A, Madej-Pilarczyk A
Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2021 May;32:115-121. Epub 2021 Apr 20 doi: 10.1016/j.ejpn.2021.04.005. PMID: 33940562
Reid SM, Westbury C, Guzys AT, Reddihough DS
Dev Med Child Neurol 2020 Mar;62(3):346-353. Epub 2019 Sep 8 doi: 10.1111/dmcn.14350. PMID: 31495925
Malbora B, Avci Z, Ozbek N
Skinmed 2014 Mar-Apr;12(2):117-8. PMID: 24933854
Reid SM, McCutcheon J, Reddihough DS, Johnson H
Dev Med Child Neurol 2012 Nov;54(11):1032-6. Epub 2012 Aug 9 doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2012.04382.x. PMID: 22881219
Duffner PK, Barczykowski A, Jalal K, Yan L, Kay DM, Carter RL
Pediatr Neurol 2011 Sep;45(3):141-8. doi: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2011.05.007. PMID: 21824559

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