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Weakness of facial musculature

MedGen UID:
98103
Concept ID:
C0427055
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Facial Paresis; Pareses, Facial; Paresis, Facial
SNOMED CT: Facial weakness (95666008); Weakness of face muscles (95666008)
 
HPO: HP:0030319

Definition

Reduced strength of one or more muscles innervated by the facial nerve (the seventh cranial nerve). [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Autosomal recessive multiple pterygium syndrome
MedGen UID:
82696
Concept ID:
C0265261
Congenital Abnormality
Multiple pterygium syndromes comprise a group of multiple congenital anomaly disorders characterized by webbing (pterygia) of the neck, elbows, and/or knees and joint contractures (arthrogryposis) (Morgan et al., 2006). The multiple pterygium syndromes are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous but are traditionally divided into prenatally lethal (253290) and nonlethal (Escobar) types.
Deficiency of butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase
MedGen UID:
90998
Concept ID:
C0342783
Disease or Syndrome
Most infants with short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) identified through newborn screening programs have remained well, and asymptomatic relatives who meet diagnostic criteria are reported. Thus, SCADD is now viewed as a biochemical phenotype rather than a disease. A broad range of clinical findings was originally reported in those with confirmed SCADD, including severe dysmorphic facial features, feeding difficulties / failure to thrive, metabolic acidosis, ketotic hypoglycemia, lethargy, developmental delay, seizures, hypotonia, dystonia, and myopathy. However, individuals with no symptoms were also reported. In a large series of affected individuals detected on metabolic evaluation for developmental delay, 20% had failure to thrive, feeding difficulties, and hypotonia; 22% had seizures; and 30% had hypotonia without seizures. In contrast, the majority of infants with SCADD have been detected by expanded newborn screening, and the great majority of these infants remain asymptomatic. As with other fatty acid oxidation deficiencies, characteristic biochemical findings of SCADD may be absent except during times of physiologic stress such as fasting and illness. A diagnosis of SCADD based on clinical findings should not preclude additional testing to look for other causes.
Central core myopathy
MedGen UID:
199773
Concept ID:
C0751951
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-1A (CMYP1A) with susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia is an autosomal dominant disorder of skeletal muscle characterized by muscle weakness primarily affecting the proximal muscles of the lower limbs beginning in infancy or early childhood, although later onset of symptoms has been reported. There is significant phenotypic variability, even within families, and the wide clinical diversity most likely depends on the severity of the RYR1 mutation. The disorder is static or slowly progressive; affected individuals typically show delayed motor development and usually achieve independent walking, although many have difficulty running or climbing stairs. Additional features often include mild facial weakness, joint laxity, shoulder girdle weakness, and skeletal manifestations, such as dislocation of the hips, foot deformities, scoliosis, and Achilles tendon contractures. Some patients present with orthopedic deformities. Serum creatine kinase is usually not elevated. Respiratory involvement is rare and there is no central nervous system or cardiac involvement. Patients with dominant mutations in the RYR1 gene are at risk for malignant hyperthermia and both disorders may segregate in the same family. Historically, patients with congenital myopathy due to RYR1 mutations were diagnosed based on the finding of pathologic central cores (central core disease; CCD) on muscle biopsy, which represent areas that lack oxidative enzymes and mitochondrial activity in type 1 muscle fibers. However, additional pathologic findings may also be observed, including cores and rods, central nuclei, fiber type disproportion, multiminicores, and uniform type 1 fibers. These histopathologic features are not always specific to RYR1 myopathy and often change over time (Quinlivan et al., 2003; Jungbluth et al., 2007; Klein et al., 2012; Ogasawara and Nishino, 2021). Some patients with RYR1 mutations have pathologic findings on muscle biopsy, but are clinically asymptomatic (Shuaib et al., 1987; Quane et al., 1993). Rare patients with a more severe phenotype have been found to carry a heterozygous mutation in the RYR1 gene inherited from an unaffected parent. However, in these cases, there is a possibility of recessive inheritance (CMYP1B; 255320) with either a missed second RYR1 mutation in trans or a genomic rearrangement on the other allele that is undetectable on routine genomic sequencing, since the RYR1 gene is very large and genetic analysis may be difficult (Klein et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Myopathy See also CMYP1B (255320), caused by mutation in the RYR1 gene (180901) on chromosome 19q13; CMYP2A (161800), CMYP2B (620265), and CMYP2C (620278), caused by mutation in the ACTA1 gene (102610) on chromosome 1q42; CMYP3 (602771), caused by mutation in the SELENON gene (606210) on chromosome 1p36; CMYP4A (255310) and CMYP4B (609284), caused by mutation in the TPM3 gene (191030) on chromosome 1q21; CMYP5 (611705), caused by mutation in the TTN gene (188840) on chromosome 2q31; CMYP6 (605637), caused by mutation in the MYH2 gene (160740) on chromosome 17p13; CMYP7A (608358) and CMYP7B (255160), caused by mutation in the MYH7 gene (160760) on chromosome 14q11; CMYP8 (618654), caused by mutation in the ACTN2 gene (102573) on chromosome 1q43; CMYP9A (618822) and CMYP9B (618823), caused by mutation in the FXR1 gene (600819) on chromosome 3q28; CMYP10A (614399) and CMYP10B (620249), caused by mutation in the MEGF10 gene (612453) on chromosome 5q23; CMYP11 (619967), caused by mutation in the HACD1 gene (610467) on chromosome 10p12; CMYP12 (612540), caused by mutation in the CNTN1 gene (600016) on chromosome 12q12; CMYP13 (255995), caused by mutation in the STAC3 gene (615521) on chromosome 12q13; CMYP14 (618414), caused by mutation in the MYL1 gene (160780) on chromosome 2q34; CMYP15 (620161), caused by mutation in the TNNC2 gene (191039) on chromosome 20q13; CMYP16 (618524), caused by mutation in the MYBPC1 gene (160794) on chromosome 12q23; CMYP17 (618975), caused by mutation in the MYOD1 gene (159970) on chromosome 11p15; CMYP18 (620246), caused by mutation in the CACNA1S gene (114208) on chromosome 1q32; CMYP19 (618578), caused by mutation in the PAX7 gene (167410) on chromosome 1p36; CMYP20 (620310), caused by mutation in the RYR3 gene (180903) on chromosome 15q13; CMYP21 (620326), caused by mutation in the DNAJB4 gene (611327) on chromosome 1p31; CMYP22A (620351) and CMYP22B (620369), both caused by mutation in the SCN4A gene (603967) on chromosome 17q23; CMYP23 (609285), caused by mutation in the TPM2 gene (190990) on chromosome 9p13; and CMYP24 (617336), caused by mutation in the MYPN gene (608517) on chromosome 10q21.
King Denborough syndrome
MedGen UID:
327082
Concept ID:
C1840365
Disease or Syndrome
King-Denborough syndrome (KDS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the triad of congenital myopathy, dysmorphic features, and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (summary by Dowling et al., 2011).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 7B
MedGen UID:
375157
Concept ID:
C1843315
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of DCTN1-related neurodegeneration includes Perry syndrome, distal hereditary motor neuronopathy type 7B (dHMN7B), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), motor neuron disease / amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and progressive supranuclear palsy. Some individuals present with overlapping phenotypes (e.g., FTD-ALS, Perry syndrome-dHMN7B). Perry syndrome (the most common of the phenotypes associated with DCTN1) is characterized by parkinsonism, neuropsychiatric symptoms, hypoventilation, and weight loss. The mean age of onset in those with Perry syndrome is 49 years (range: 35-70 years), and the mean disease duration is five years (range: 2-14 years). In most affected persons, the reported cause/circumstance of death relates to sudden death/hypoventilation or suicide.
Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis
MedGen UID:
375302
Concept ID:
C1843851
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B5
MedGen UID:
335764
Concept ID:
C1847759
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB5 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy with impaired intellectual development and structural brain abnormalities (Brockington et al., 2001). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Nemaline myopathy 2
MedGen UID:
342534
Concept ID:
C1850569
Disease or Syndrome
Nemaline myopathy-2 (NEM2) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder with a wide range of severity. The most common clinical presentation is early-onset (in infancy or childhood) muscle weakness predominantly affecting proximal limb muscles. Muscle biopsy shows accumulation of Z-disc and thin filament proteins into aggregates named 'nemaline bodies' or 'nemaline rods,' usually accompanied by disorganization of the muscle Z discs. The clinical and histologic spectrum of entities caused by variants in the NEB gene is a continuum, ranging in severity. The distribution of weakness can vary from generalized muscle weakness, more pronounced in proximal limb muscles, to distal-only involvement, although neck flexor weakness appears to be rather consistent. Histologic patterns range from a severe usually nondystrophic disturbance of the myofibrillar pattern to an almost normal pattern, with or without nemaline bodies, sometimes combined with cores (summary by Lehtokari et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Nemaline Myopathy See also NEM1 (255310), caused by mutation in the tropomyosin-3 gene (TPM3; 191030) on chromosome 1q22; NEM3 (161800), caused by mutation in the alpha-actin-1 gene (ACTA1; 102610) on chromosome 1q42; NEM4 (609285), caused by mutation in the beta-tropomyosin gene (TPM2; 190990) on chromosome 9p13; NEM5A (605355), also known as Amish nemaline myopathy, NEM5B (620386), and NEM5C (620389), all caused by mutation in the troponin T1 gene (TNNT1; 191041) on chromosome 19q13; NEM6 (609273), caused by mutation in the KBTBD13 gene (613727) on chromosome 15q22; NEM7 (610687), caused by mutation in the cofilin-2 gene (CFL2; 601443) on chromosome 14q13; NEM8 (615348), caused by mutation in the KLHL40 gene (615340), on chromosome 3p22; NEM9 (615731), caused by mutation in the KLHL41 gene (607701) on chromosome 2q31; NEM10 (616165), caused by mutation in the LMOD3 gene (616112) on chromosome 3p14; and NEM11 (617336), caused by mutation in the MYPN gene (608517) on chromosome 10q21. Several of the genes encode components of skeletal muscle sarcomeric thin filaments (Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001). Mutations in the NEB gene are the most common cause of nemaline myopathy (Lehtokari et al., 2006).
Bailey-Bloch congenital myopathy
MedGen UID:
340586
Concept ID:
C1850625
Disease or Syndrome
STAC3 disorder is characterized by congenital myopathy, musculoskeletal involvement of the trunk and extremities, feeding difficulties, and delayed motor milestones. Most affected individuals have weakness with myopathic facies, scoliosis, kyphosis or kyphoscoliosis, and contractures. Other common findings are ptosis, abnormalities of the palate (including cleft palate), and short stature. Risk for malignant hyperthermia susceptibility and restrictive lung disease are increased. Intellect is typically normal. Originally described in individuals from the Lumbee Native American tribe (an admixture of Cheraw Indian, English, and African American ancestry) in the state of North Carolina and reported as Native American myopathy, STAC3 disorder has now been identified in numerous other populations worldwide.
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
376880
Concept ID:
C1850792
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are a group of inherited disorders affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Patients present clinically with onset of variable muscle weakness between infancy and adulthood. These disorders have been classified according to the location of the defect: presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic. CMS10 is an autosomal recessive CMS resulting from a postsynaptic defect affecting endplate maintenance of the NMJ. Patients present with limb-girdle weakness in the first decade. Treatment with ephedrine or salbutamol may be beneficial; cholinesterase inhibitors should be avoided (summary by Engel et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Nemaline myopathy 7
MedGen UID:
343979
Concept ID:
C1853154
Disease or Syndrome
Nemaline myopathy-7 is an autosomal recessive congenital myopathy characterized by very early onset of hypotonia and delayed motor development. Affected individuals have difficulty walking and running due to proximal muscle weakness. The disorder is slowly progressive, and patients may lose independent ambulation. Muscle biopsy shows nemaline rods and may later show minicores, abnormal protein aggregates, and dystrophic changes (summary by Ockeloen et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see 161800.
Cold-induced sweating syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
342816
Concept ID:
C1853198
Disease or Syndrome
Cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS) and its infantile presentation, Crisponi syndrome(CS) is characterized by dysmorphic features (distinctive facies, lower facial weakness, flexion deformity at the elbows, camptodactyly with fisted hands, misshapen feet, and overriding toes); intermittent contracture of facial and oropharyngeal muscles when crying or being handled with puckering of lips and drooling of foamy saliva often associated with laryngospasm and respiratory distress; excessive startling and opisthotonus-like posturing with unexpected tactile or auditory stimuli; poor suck reflex and severely impaired swallowing; and a scaly erythematous rash. During the first decade of life, children with CISS/CS develop profuse sweating of the face, arms, and chest with ambient temperatures below 18º to 22º C, and with other stimuli including nervousness or ingestion of sweets. Affected individuals sweat very little in hot environments and may feel overheated. Progressive thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis occurs, requiring intervention in the second decade.
Neurogenic scapuloperoneal syndrome, Kaeser type
MedGen UID:
356670
Concept ID:
C1867005
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neuromuscular disease with characteristics of adult-onset muscle weakness and atrophy in a scapuloperoneal distribution, mild involvement of the facial muscles, dysphagia, and gynaecomastia. Elevated serum CK levels and mixed myopathic and neurogenic abnormalities are associated clinical findings. Caused by heterozygous mutation in the DES gene on chromosome 2q35.
Early-onset myopathy with fatal cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
435983
Concept ID:
C2673677
Disease or Syndrome
Salih myopathy is characterized by muscle weakness (manifest during the neonatal period or in early infancy) and delayed motor development; children acquire independent walking between ages 20 months and four years. In the first decade of life, global motor performance is stable or tends to improve. Moderate joint and neck contractures and spinal rigidity may manifest in the first decade but become more obvious in the second decade. Scoliosis develops after age 11 years. Cardiac dysfunction manifests between ages five and 16 years, progresses rapidly, and leads to death between ages eight and 20 years, usually from heart rhythm disturbances.
Myotonic dystrophy type 2
MedGen UID:
419137
Concept ID:
C2931689
Disease or Syndrome
Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is characterized by myotonia and muscle dysfunction (proximal and axial weakness, myalgia, and stiffness), and less commonly by posterior subcapsular cataracts, cardiac conduction defects, insulin-insensitive type 2 diabetes mellitus, and other endocrine abnormalities. While myotonia (involuntary muscle contraction with delayed relaxation) has been reported during the first decade, onset is typically in the third to fourth decade, most commonly with fluctuating or episodic muscle pain that can be debilitating and proximal and axial weakness of the neck flexors and the hip flexors. Subsequently, weakness occurs in the elbow extensors and finger flexors. Facial weakness and weakness of the ankle dorsiflexors are less common. Myotonia rarely causes severe symptoms. In a subset of individuals, calf hypertrophy in combination with brisk reflexes is notable.
Congenital myopathy 11
MedGen UID:
462881
Concept ID:
C3151531
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-11 (CMYP11) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized clinically by severe hypotonia apparent at birth, resulting in early feeding problems, motor delay, and walking difficulties. However, the course of the disease is nonprogressive: most affected individuals achieve independent ambulation and tend to show improvement of muscle weakness throughout childhood and early adulthood. There is no respiratory or cardiac involvement; cognitive development is normal. Muscle biopsy may show rare centralized nuclei, type 1 fiber hypotrophy, and type 1 fiber predominance, suggestive of a pathologic diagnosis of congenital fiber-type disproportion (CFTD). However, the findings on skeletal muscle biopsy may be nonspecific (Muhammad et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Congenital myopathy 10b, mild variant
MedGen UID:
762102
Concept ID:
C3541476
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-10B (CMYP10B) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by infantile- or childhood-onset myopathy, areflexia, dysphagia, and respiratory distress that usually requires nocturnal ventilation. Other common features include facial and neck muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, contractures, scoliosis, high-arched palate, hyporeflexia, and difficulties walking. The disorder is slowly progressive and most patients follow a chronic course. Muscle biopsy shows variable findings, including type 1 fiber predominance, minicore lesions, and myofibrillar disorganization (Boyden et al., 2012; Harris et al., 2018). Patients with missense mutations affecting conserved cysteine residues in the EGF-like domain show the mild variant phenotype (CMYP10B) with later onset of respiratory failure and minicores on muscle biopsy, whereas patients with more damaging mutations, including nonsense or frameshift null mutations, show the severe variant phenotype (CMYP10A) (Croci et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
815069
Concept ID:
C3808739
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndromes are genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) that are classified by the site of the transmission defect: presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic. CMS8 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by prominent defects of both the pre- and postsynaptic regions. Affected individuals have onset of muscle weakness in early childhood; the severity of the weakness and muscles affected is variable (summary by Maselli et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Myopathy, centronuclear, 5
MedGen UID:
863251
Concept ID:
C4014814
Disease or Syndrome
Centronuclear myopathy-5 (CNM5) is an autosomal recessive congenital myopathy characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia with respiratory insufficiency and difficulty feeding. Some patients die in infancy, and some develop dilated cardiomyopathy. Children show severely delayed motor development (summary by Agrawal et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of centronuclear myopathy, see CNM1 (160150).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 14
MedGen UID:
864034
Concept ID:
C4015597
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-14 is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of limb-girdle muscle weakness in early childhood. The disorder is slowly progressive, and some patients may become wheelchair-bound. There is no respiratory or cardiac involvement. Treatment with anticholinesterase medication may be beneficial (summary by Cossins et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 24
MedGen UID:
864080
Concept ID:
C4015643
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-24 (COXPD24) is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder with wide phenotypic variability. Most patients present in infancy with delayed neurodevelopment, refractory seizures, hypotonia, and hearing impairment due to auditory neuropathy. Less common features may include cortical blindness, renal dysfunction, and/or liver involvement, suggestive of Alpers syndrome (MTDPS4A; 203700). Patients with the severe phenotype tend to have brain abnormalities on imaging, including cerebral atrophy and hyperintensities in the basal ganglia and brainstem, consistent with Leigh syndrome. Laboratory values may be normal or show increased lactate and evidence of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects, particularly in muscle. Some patients achieve little developmental milestones and may die in infancy or early childhood. However, some patients have a less severe phenotype manifest only by myopathy (summary by Sofou et al., 2015, Vanlander et al., 2015, and Mizuguchi et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 1
MedGen UID:
897191
Concept ID:
C4225153
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 4B
MedGen UID:
904424
Concept ID:
C4225369
Disease or Syndrome
Fast-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (FCCMS) is a disorder of the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) characterized by early-onset progressive muscle weakness. The disorder results from kinetic abnormalities of the AChR channel, specifically from abnormally brief opening and activity of the channel, with a rapid decay in endplate current and a failure to reach the threshold for depolarization. Treatment with pyridostigmine or amifampridine may be helpful; quinine, quinidine, and fluoxetine should be avoided (summary by Sine et al., 2003 and Engel et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 3C
MedGen UID:
903088
Concept ID:
C4225370
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome associated with AChR deficiency is a disorder of the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) clinically characterized by early-onset muscle weakness with variable severity. Electrophysiologic studies show low amplitude of the miniature endplate potential (MEPP) and current (MEPC) resulting from deficiency of AChR at the endplate. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or amifampridine may be helpful (summary by Engel et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, 1B, fast-channel
MedGen UID:
909200
Concept ID:
C4225405
Disease or Syndrome
Fast-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (FCCMS) is a disorder of the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) characterized by early-onset progressive muscle weakness. The disorder results from kinetic abnormalities of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) channel, specifically from abnormally brief opening and activity of the channel, with a rapid decay in endplate current and a failure to reach the threshold for depolarization. Treatment with pyridostigmine or amifampridine may be helpful; quinine, quinidine, and fluoxetine should be avoided (summary by Sine et al., 2003 and Engel et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Hypotonia, ataxia, and delayed development syndrome
MedGen UID:
934585
Concept ID:
C4310618
Disease or Syndrome
EBF3 neurodevelopmental disorder (EBF3-NDD) is associated with developmental delay (DD) / intellectual disability (ID), speech delay, gait or truncal ataxia, hypotonia, behavioral problems, and facial dysmorphism. Variability between individuals with EBF3-NDD is significant. Although all affected children have DD noted in early infancy, intellect generally ranges from mild to severe ID, with two individuals functioning in the low normal range. Less common issues can include genitourinary abnormalities and gastrointestinal and/or musculoskeletal involvement. To date, 42 symptomatic individuals from 39 families have been reported.
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 21
MedGen UID:
934621
Concept ID:
C4310654
Disease or Syndrome
Any congenital myasthenic syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the SLC18A3 gene.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 3
MedGen UID:
934701
Concept ID:
C4310734
Disease or Syndrome
Any autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the TK2 gene.
Orthostatic hypotension 1
MedGen UID:
1648402
Concept ID:
C4746777
Disease or Syndrome
Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) deficiency is characterized by lack of sympathetic noradrenergic function but normal parasympathetic and sympathetic cholinergic function. Affected individuals exhibit profound deficits in autonomic regulation of cardiovascular function that predispose to orthostatic hypotension. Although DBH deficiency appears to be present from birth, the diagnosis is not generally recognized until late childhood. The combination of ptosis of the eyelids in infants and children, together with hypotension, is suggestive of the disease. In the perinatal period, DBH deficiency has been complicated by vomiting, dehydration, hypotension, hypothermia, and hypoglycemia requiring repeated hospitalization; children have reduced exercise capacity. By early adulthood, individuals have profound orthostatic hypotension, greatly reduced exercise tolerance, ptosis of the eyelids, and nasal stuffiness. Presyncopal symptoms include dizziness, blurred vision, dyspnea, nuchal discomfort, and chest pain; symptoms may worsen in hot environments or after heavy meals or alcohol ingestion. Life expectancy is unknown, but some affected individuals have lived beyond age 60 years.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with regression, abnormal movements, loss of speech, and seizures
MedGen UID:
1648345
Concept ID:
C4748127
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy with reduced type 2 muscle fibers
MedGen UID:
1672638
Concept ID:
C5193081
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-14 (CMYP14) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by onset of severe muscle weakness apparent at birth and sometimes in utero. Affected infants have difficulty breathing independently and usually require mechanical ventilation for variable lengths of time. Other features include delayed motor development with delayed walking, hypo- or areflexia, and high-arched palate. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows variation in fiber size with specific atrophy of the fast-twitch type II fibers. Cardiac muscle is not affected (summary by Ravenscroft et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Metabolic crises, recurrent, with variable encephalomyopathic features and neurologic regression
MedGen UID:
1681269
Concept ID:
C5193083
Disease or Syndrome
Recurrent metabolic crises with variable encephalomyopathic features and neurologic regression (MECREN) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most affected individuals present in the first years of life with episodic lactic acidosis associated with illness or stress, resulting in transient or permanent neurologic dysfunction. Some patients may recover, whereas others show subsequent variable developmental regression of motor and cognitive skills. Other features may include dystonia, hypotonia with inability to sit or walk, seizures, and abnormal signals in the basal ganglia. There is significant phenotypic heterogeneity, even among patients with the same mutation (summary by Almannai et al., 2018).
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 3, myogenic type
MedGen UID:
1680655
Concept ID:
C5193121
Disease or Syndrome
Myogenic-type arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-3 (AMC3) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by decreased fetal movements, hypotonia, variable skeletal defects, including clubfoot and scoliosis, and delayed motor milestones with difficulty walking (summary by Baumann et al., 2017).
Oculopharyngeal myopathy with leukoencephalopathy 1
MedGen UID:
1684701
Concept ID:
C5231436
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, congenital, with structured cores and z-line abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1684705
Concept ID:
C5231445
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-8 (CMYP8) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by hypotonia and delayed motor development apparent from infancy or childhood, resulting in difficulties walking or loss of ambulation within the first few decades. Affected individuals show respiratory insufficiency, high-arched palate, and scoliosis; external ophthalmoplegia may also be present. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows cores and myofibrillar disorganization (Lornage et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Wieacker-Wolff syndrome, female-restricted
MedGen UID:
1715791
Concept ID:
C5393303
Disease or Syndrome
Female-restricted Wieacker-Wolff syndrome (WRWFFR) is an X-linked dominant syndromic form of neurogenic arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) with central and peripheral nervous system involvement. Affected individuals have decreased fetal movements causing the development of contractures in utero and resulting in AMC and diffuse contractures involving the large and small joints apparent at birth. There is global developmental delay with difficulty walking or inability to walk, hypotonia that often evolves to spasticity, and variably impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech and language. Dysmorphic facial features, including hypotonic facies, ptosis, microretrognathia, and small mouth, are seen in most patients. Seizures are uncommon; some patients have evidence of a peripheral motor neuropathy with distal muscle weakness. The level of X inactivation in lymphocytes and fibroblasts is often skewed, but may not predict the severity of the phenotype. Most cases occur sporadically; rare X-linked dominant inheritance has been reported in families (summary by Frints et al., 2019).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 18
MedGen UID:
1713890
Concept ID:
C5394140
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-18 (MTDPS18) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by early-onset progressive weakness and atrophy of the distal limb muscles, resulting in loss of ambulation as well as atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles with clawed hands. Affected individuals may also develop scoliosis and have hypo- or hyperreflexia and decreased pulmonary vital capacity. Examination of skeletal muscle shows neurogenic atrophy and combined mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation deficiency associated with mtDNA depletion. The clinical phenotype is reminiscent of spinal muscular atrophy (see SMA, 253300) and the metabolic profile is reminiscent of 2-aminoadipic 2-oxoadipic aciduria (AMOXAD; 204750), which is caused by mutation in the DHTKD1 gene (614984) (summary by Boczonadi et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive mtDNA depletion syndromes, see MTDPS1 (603041).
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy 2
MedGen UID:
1718769
Concept ID:
C5394548
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy-2 (OPDM2) is an autosomal dominant muscle disorder characterized by onset of distal muscle weakness, mainly of the lower limbs, and/or ophthalmoplegia in the second or third decades of life. The disorder is slowly progressive, and patients develop facial weakness, bulbar weakness, and difficulty walking or climbing stairs. Some patients may have upper limb involvement and subclinical respiratory insufficiency. Laboratory studies show increased serum creatine kinase; skeletal muscle biopsy shows myopathic changes with abnormal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions (summary by Deng et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of OPDM, see OPDM1 (164310).
Cytochrome-c oxidase deficiency disease
MedGen UID:
1750917
Concept ID:
C5435656
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 1 (MC4DN1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by rapidly progressive neurodegeneration and encephalopathy with loss of motor and cognitive skills between about 5 and 18 months of age after normal early development. Affected individuals show hypotonia, failure to thrive, loss of the ability to sit or walk, poor communication, and poor eye contact. Other features may include oculomotor abnormalities, including slow saccades, strabismus, ophthalmoplegia, and nystagmus, as well as deafness, apneic episodes, ataxia, tremor, and brisk tendon reflexes. Brain imaging shows bilateral symmetric lesions in the basal ganglia, consistent with a clinical diagnosis of Leigh syndrome (see 256000). Some patients may also have abnormalities in the brainstem and cerebellum. Laboratory studies usually show increased serum and CSF lactate and decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV in patient tissues. There is phenotypic variability, but death in childhood, often due to central respiratory failure, is common (summary by Tiranti et al., 1998; Tiranti et al., 1999; Teraoka et al., 1999; Poyau et al., 2000) Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex IV Deficiency Most isolated COX deficiencies are inherited as autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in nuclear-encoded genes; mutations in the mtDNA-encoded COX subunit genes are relatively rare (Shoubridge, 2001; Sacconi et al., 2003). Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency caused by mutation in nuclear-encoded genes, in addition to MC4DN1, include MC4DN2 (604377), caused by mutation in the SCO2 gene (604272); MC4DN3 (619046), caused by mutation in the COX10 gene (602125); MC4DN4 (619048), caused by mutation in the SCO1 gene (603664); MC4DN5 (220111), caused by mutation in the LRPPRC gene (607544); MC4DN6 (615119), caused by mutation in the COX15 gene (603646); MC4DN7 (619051), caused by mutation in the COX6B1 gene (124089); MC4DN8 (619052), caused by mutation in the TACO1 gene (612958); MC4DN9 (616500), caused by mutation in the COA5 gene (613920); MC4DN10 (619053), caused by mutation in the COX14 gene (614478); MC4DN11 (619054), caused by mutation in the COX20 gene (614698); MC4DN12 (619055), caused by mutation in the PET100 gene (614770); MC4DN13 (616501), caused by mutation in the COA6 gene (614772); MC4DN14 (619058), caused by mutation in the COA3 gene (614775); MC4DN15 (619059), caused by mutation in the COX8A gene (123870); MC4DN16 (619060), caused by mutation in the COX4I1 gene (123864); MC4DN17 (619061), caused by mutation in the APOPT1 gene (616003); MC4DN18 (619062), caused by mutation in the COX6A2 gene (602009); MC4DN19 (619063), caused by mutation in the PET117 gene (614771); MC4DN20 (619064), caused by mutation in the COX5A gene (603773); MC4DN21 (619065), caused by mutation in the COXFA4 gene (603883); MC4DN22 (619355), caused by mutation in the COX16 gene (618064); and MC4DN23 (620275), caused by mutation in the COX11 gene (603648). Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency has been associated with mutations in several mitochondrial genes, including MTCO1 (516030), MTCO2 (516040), MTCO3 (516050), MTTS1 (590080), MTTL1 (590050), and MTTN (590010).
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 18
MedGen UID:
1752734
Concept ID:
C5436720
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 18 (MC4DN18) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder that primarily affects skeletal muscle tissue. Affected individuals present in infancy with hypotonia, limb muscle weakness, and high-arched palate. The severity of the disorder is variable: some patients may only have gait difficulties, whereas others may also have significant respiratory insufficiency and cardiomyopathy. Death in infancy has been reported. Patient skeletal muscle shows decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV (Inoue et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease, multisystem, infantile-onset 2
MedGen UID:
1778117
Concept ID:
C5543623
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease-2 (IMNEPD2) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic disorder characterized by cholestatic hepatitis, poor feeding associated with poor overall growth, and hypoglycemia apparent from infancy. Most, but not all, patients have variable global developmental delay. Additional common features include sensorineural deafness, retinal abnormalities with visual defects, and hypotonia. Some patients have endocrine abnormalities, including hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, pancreatic dysfunction, hypothyroidism, and primary amenorrhea. Additional features may include hypertriglyceridemia, anemia, proteinuria, increased lactate, and recurrent infections. Brain imaging often shows dysmyelination, thin corpus callosum, cerebral atrophy, and white matter abnormalities. Although the clinical manifestations and severity of the disorder are highly variable, death in early childhood may occur (summary by Williams et al., 2019 and Zeiad et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of IMNEPD, see IMNEPD1 (616263).
Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, 7B, presynaptic, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1794157
Concept ID:
C5561947
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome-7B (CMS7B) is characterized by severe generalized muscle weakness apparent from birth; decreased fetal movements may be apparent in utero. Affected infants have generalized hypotonia with poor cry and feeding, head lag, and facial muscle weakness with ptosis. Some patients may have respiratory involvement. Electrophysiologic studies show decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and a decremental response to repetitive nerve stimulation. Treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine and pyridostigmine may result in clinical improvement (summary by Bauche et al., 2020).
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy 3
MedGen UID:
1794166
Concept ID:
C5561956
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy-3 (OPDM3) is a neuromyodegenerative disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness with ocular, facial, pharyngeal, and distal limb involvement, resulting in dysarthria and gait difficulties. The onset of the disorder is usually in adulthood, although childhood onset has rarely been reported. Additional features include hyporeflexia, proximal muscle weakness, neck muscle weakness, dysarthria, dysphagia, and ptosis. Some patients may develop pigmentary retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, or hearing loss. Cognition is usually not affected, but there may be deficits or psychiatric manifestations. Brain imaging tends to show a leukoencephalopathy, often with a characteristic linear signal along the corticomedullary junction on brain imaging. Skin and muscle biopsy show intranuclear inclusions and rimmed vacuoles. Many of the clinical features are reminiscent of NIID, suggesting that these disorders likely fall within a broad phenotypic spectrum of diseases with neuromyodegenerative features associated with abnormal repeat expansions in this gene (summary by Ogasawara et al., 2020 and Yu et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of OPDM, see OPDM1 (164310).
Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 3, digenic
MedGen UID:
1794169
Concept ID:
C5561959
Disease or Syndrome
Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy-3 (FSHD3) is a digenic muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of proximal muscle weakness affecting the face, neck, scapular muscles, and upper and lower limbs. Muscle involvement is usually asymmetric, and other muscle groups may become involved with progression of the disease (summary by Hamanaka et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FSHD, see FSHD1 (158900).
Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 4, digenic
MedGen UID:
1794170
Concept ID:
C5561960
Disease or Syndrome
Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a skeletal muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive muscle weakness of the face and upper extremity muscles. With disease progression, other muscles also may become affected. There is significant clinical variability and incomplete penetrance (summary by van den Boogaard et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FSHD, see FSHD1 (158900).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, type 2FF
MedGen UID:
1794191
Concept ID:
C5561981
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2FF (CMT2FF) is an autosomal dominant progressive axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy characterized by early-childhood onset of difficulties walking or running due to atrophy and weakness of the lower limbs. Most patients have foot and ankle deformities, requiring surgery or walking aids. Some patients lose independent ambulation. There is also prominent involvement of the upper limbs, with weakness and atrophy of the forearm, wrist, and intrinsic hand muscles. Proximal muscle function is preserved. Affected individuals have variable distal sensory impairment. Most patients have hyporeflexia, although brisk reflexes, suggesting upper motor involvement, have been described in 1 family. Sural nerve biopsy showed abnormal myelination (Rebelo et al., 2021). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, autosomal recessive 27
MedGen UID:
1794212
Concept ID:
C5562002
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-27 (LGMDR27) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness primarily affecting the lower limbs and resulting in walking difficulty or loss of ambulation. The age at onset is highly variable, from infancy to young adulthood. Patients with infantile onset may have a more severe disease course with rapid progression. Upper limb involvement and distal muscle weakness may also occur. Additional more variable features include neck muscle weakness, scoliosis, and joint contractures. Less common features include impaired intellectual development or speech delay, cardiomyopathy, and cardiac arrhythmia. Muscle biopsy shows nonspecific dystrophic changes (Coppens et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Myopathy, distal, 5
MedGen UID:
1798944
Concept ID:
C5567521
Disease or Syndrome
Distal myopathy-5 (MPD5) is an autosomal recessive, slowly progressive muscle disorder characterized by adolescent onset of distal muscle weakness and atrophy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Other features include facial weakness and hyporeflexia. Patients remain ambulatory even after long disease duration (summary by Park et al., 2016).
Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1804638
Concept ID:
C5676876
Disease or Syndrome
Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome-1 (CFZS1) is a multisystem congenital disorder characterized by hypotonia, Moebius sequence (bilateral congenital facial palsy with impairment of ocular abduction), Pierre Robin complex (micrognathia, glossoptosis, and high-arched or cleft palate), delayed motor milestones, and failure to thrive. More variable features include dysmorphic facial features, brain abnormalities, and intellectual disability. It has been postulated that many clinical features in CFZS1 may be secondary effects of muscle weakness during development or brainstem anomalies (summary by Pasetti et al., 2016). Di Gioia et al. (2017) determined that CFZS1 represents a slowly progressive congenital myopathy resulting from a defect in myoblast fusion. Genetic Heterogeneity of Carey-Fineman-Ziter Syndrome Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome-2 (CFZS2) is caused by mutation in the MYMX gene (619912) on chromosome 6p21.
Inclusion body myopathy and brain white matter abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1812978
Concept ID:
C5676909
Disease or Syndrome
Inclusion body myopathy and brain white matter abnormalities (IBMWMA) is an autosomal dominant adult-onset disorder characterized predominantly by proximal limb girdle muscle weakness affecting the lower and upper limbs and resulting in gait difficulties and scapular winging. Additional features may include dysarthria, dysphagia, low back pain, and hyporeflexia. EMG is consistent with a myopathic process, although neuropathic findings have also been shown. Muscle biopsy shows fiber type variation, internal nuclei, rimmed vacuoles, and cytoplasmic protein aggregates or inclusions. Serum creatine kinase is usually elevated. Cognitive impairment or frontotemporal dementia occurs in some patients. The disorder is slowly progressive; some patients become wheelchair-bound after many years. Rare patients with this mutation develop ALS; some have both myopathy and ALS. Brain imaging shows white matter abnormalities using diffusion tensor imaging. The disorder is classified as multisystem proteinopathy-6 (MSP6) due to the characteristic disease mechanism of protein misfolding and abnormal tissue deposition (summary by Leoni et al., 2021).
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy 4
MedGen UID:
1809981
Concept ID:
C5676941
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy-4 (OPDM4) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder characterized by progressive ptosis, ophthalmoparesis, facial and masseter weakness, and muscle weakness of the distal limbs. Initial symptoms of the disorder, ptosis and limited eye movements, most commonly appear in the second or third decades. There is slow progression with development of dysarthria, dysphagia, and distal limb weakness and atrophy associated with absent deep tendon reflexes; sensation is normal. Serum creatine kinase is often increased, and skeletal muscle biopsy typically shows chronic myopathic changes with rimmed vacuoles and filamentous intranuclear inclusions (summary by Yu et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of OPDM, see OPDM1 (164310).
Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1800921
Concept ID:
C5677012
Disease or Syndrome
Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome-2 (CFZS2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by weakness of the facial musculature, hypomimic facies, increased overbite, micrognathia, and facial dysmorphism. Other features may include failure to thrive, axial hypotonia, and progressive scoliosis (Ramirez-Martinez et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome, see CFZS1 (254940).
Congenital myopathy 15
MedGen UID:
1824046
Concept ID:
C5774273
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-15 (CMYP15) is a skeletal muscle disorder characterized by symptom onset soon after birth. Affected infants are hypotonic and have severe respiratory insufficiency and feeding problems, sometimes requiring mechanical ventilation or tube feeding. The disorder is unique in that there is gradual improvement of the severe muscle weakness with time, although forced vital capacity remains decreased. Additional features include facial weakness, scoliosis, joint contractures, and persistent ptosis or external ophthalmoplegia (van de Locht et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Congenital myopathy 2b, severe infantile, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1840936
Concept ID:
C5830300
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive congenital myopathy-2B (CMYP2B) is a disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by severe hypotonia with lack of spontaneous movements and respiratory insufficiency, usually leading to death in infancy or early childhood (Agrawal et al., 2004). However, longer survival has also been reported, likely due to the type of mutation and extent of its impact (O'Grady et al., 2015). Mutations in the ACTA1 gene can cause a range of skeletal muscle diseases. About 90% of patients with ACTA1 mutations carry heterozygous mutations, usually de novo (CMYP2A; 161800), whereas 10% of patients carry biallelic ACTA1 mutations (CMYP2B) (Nowak et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Congenital myopathy 2c, severe infantile, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1840969
Concept ID:
C5830333
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-2C (CMYP2C) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by severe congenital weakness usually resulting in death from respiratory failure in the first year or so of life. Patients present at birth with hypotonia, lack of antigravity movements, poor head control, and difficulties feeding or breathing, often requiring tube-feeding and mechanical ventilation. Decreased fetal movements may be observed in some cases. Of the patients with congenital myopathy caused by mutation in the ACTA1 gene, about 90% carry heterozygous mutations that are usually de novo and cause the severe infantile phenotype. Some patients with heterozygous mutations have a more typical and milder disease course with delayed motor development and proximal muscle weakness, but are able to achieve independent ambulation (CMYP2A; 161800). The severity of the disease most likely depends on the detrimental effect of the mutation, although there are probably additional modifying factors (Ryan et al., 2001; Laing et al., 2009; Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001; Agrawal et al., 2004; Nowak et al., 2013; Sewry et al., 2019; Laitila and Wallgren-Pettersson, 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Myopathy, sarcoplasmic body
MedGen UID:
1840998
Concept ID:
C5830362
Disease or Syndrome
Sarcoplasmic body myopathy (MYOSB), also known as myoglobinopathy, is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult-onset muscle weakness affecting the proximal and distal muscles. Affected individuals usually present with proximal and axial muscle weakness leading to gait disturbances, although some present with hand muscle weakness and atrophy. The disorder is slowly progressive, and patients may lose ambulation after a long disease course. Some individuals develop respiratory or cardiac symptoms, often needing nocturnal ventilation. Other more variable features may include neck muscle weakness and dysphagia; facial muscle weakness is uncommon (Olive et al., 2019; Hama et al., 2022).
Congenital myopathy 20
MedGen UID:
1841029
Concept ID:
C5830393
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-20 (CMYP20) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder that shows wide phenotypic variability. Some patients present in early childhood with proximal muscle weakness affecting the lower and upper limbs resulting in difficulties running and climbing, whereas others present soon after birth with congenital limb or distal contractures. Additional features may include dysmorphic facial features and global developmental delay. Skeletal muscle biopsy may show nemaline rods (Nilipour et al., 2018; Pehlivan et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Congenital myopathy 22A, classic
MedGen UID:
1841089
Concept ID:
C5830453
Disease or Syndrome
Classic congenital myopathy-22A (CMYP22A) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by onset of muscle weakness in utero or soon after birth. Early features may include fetal hypokinesia, breech presentation, and polyhydramnios. Affected individuals are born with severe hypotonia and require respiratory and feeding assistance. Those who survive the neonatal period show a 'classic' phenotype of congenital myopathy with delayed motor development, difficulty walking, proximal muscle weakness of the upper and lower limbs, facial and neck muscle weakness, easy fatigability, and mild limb contractures or foot deformities. Some have persistent respiratory insufficiency; dysmorphic facial features may be present (Zaharieva et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Congenital myopathy 22B, severe fetal
MedGen UID:
1841137
Concept ID:
C5830501
Disease or Syndrome
Severe fetal congenital myopathy-22B (CMYP22B) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by in utero onset of severe muscle weakness manifest as fetal akinesia. The pregnancies are often complicated by polyhydramnios, and affected individuals develop fetal hydrops with pulmonary hypoplasia, severe joint contractures, and generalized muscle hypoplasia. Those who are born have respiratory failure resulting in death. Dysmorphic facial features may be present. The features in these patients overlap with fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS; see 208150) and lethal congenital contractures syndrome (LCCS; see 253310) (Zaharieva et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Nemaline myopathy 5C, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1841185
Concept ID:
C5830549
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant nemaline myopathy-5C (NEM5C) is a relatively mild skeletal muscle disorder with wide clinical variability, even within families. Affected individuals develop symptoms of muscle weakness in the first or second decades; those with earlier onset tend to have a more severe disease course. Features include difficulty walking on the heels, waddling gait, proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs, and Gowers sign. Additional features may include myopathic facies, high-arched palate, scoliosis or kyphosis, and ankle weakness. Patients remain ambulatory into late adulthood. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows hypotrophy of type 1 fibers, hypertrophy of type 2 fibers, fiber size variation, and myofibrillar disorganization. Nemaline rods in type 1 fibers are often observed, but are not always present (Konersman et al., 2017; Holling et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM2 (256030).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Robinson MW, Baiungo J
Otolaryngol Clin North Am 2018 Dec;51(6):1151-1167. Epub 2018 Sep 24 doi: 10.1016/j.otc.2018.07.011. PMID: 30262166
Baugh RF, Basura GJ, Ishii LE, Schwartz SR, Drumheller CM, Burkholder R, Deckard NA, Dawson C, Driscoll C, Gillespie MB, Gurgel RK, Halperin J, Khalid AN, Kumar KA, Micco A, Munsell D, Rosenbaum S, Vaughan W
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2013 Nov;149(3 Suppl):S1-27. doi: 10.1177/0194599813505967. PMID: 24189771
Tiemstra JD, Khatkhate N
Am Fam Physician 2007 Oct 1;76(7):997-1002. PMID: 17956069

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Lassaletta L, Morales-Puebla JM, Altuna X, Arbizu Á, Arístegui M, Batuecas Á, Cenjor C, Espinosa-Sánchez JM, García-Iza L, García-Raya P, González-Otero T, Mañós M, Martín C, Moraleda S, Roda JM, Santiago S, Benítez J, Cavallé L, Correia V, Estévez JM, Gómez J, González R, Jiménez J, Lacosta JL, Lavilla MJ, Peñarrocha J, Polo R, García-Purriños F, Ramos F, Tomás M, Uzcanga M, Vallejo LÁ, Gavilán J
Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp (Engl Ed) 2020 Mar-Apr;71(2):99-118. Epub 2019 May 13 doi: 10.1016/j.otorri.2018.12.004. PMID: 31097197
Paolucci T, Cardarola A, Colonnelli P, Ferracuti G, Gonnella R, Murgia M, Santilli V, Paoloni M, Bernetti A, Agostini F, Mangone M
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2020 Feb;56(1):58-67. Epub 2019 Mar 27 doi: 10.23736/S1973-9087.19.05757-5. PMID: 30916916
Hohman MH, Hadlock TA
Laryngoscope 2014 Jul;124(7):E283-93. Epub 2014 Jan 15 doi: 10.1002/lary.24542. PMID: 24431233
Pereira LM, Obara K, Dias JM, Menacho MO, Lavado EL, Cardoso JR
Clin Rehabil 2011 Jul;25(7):649-58. Epub 2011 Mar 7 doi: 10.1177/0269215510395634. PMID: 21382865
Finsterer J
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2008 Jul;265(7):743-52. Epub 2008 Mar 27 doi: 10.1007/s00405-008-0646-4. PMID: 18368417Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Backiavathy V, Pal S, Poonam NS, Subramanian N
Indian J Ophthalmol 2022 Jun;70(6):2211. doi: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_1262_22. PMID: 35648031Free PMC Article
Kim SJ, Lee HY
J Korean Med Sci 2020 Aug 3;35(30):e245. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e245. PMID: 32743989Free PMC Article
Lassaletta L, Morales-Puebla JM, Altuna X, Arbizu Á, Arístegui M, Batuecas Á, Cenjor C, Espinosa-Sánchez JM, García-Iza L, García-Raya P, González-Otero T, Mañós M, Martín C, Moraleda S, Roda JM, Santiago S, Benítez J, Cavallé L, Correia V, Estévez JM, Gómez J, González R, Jiménez J, Lacosta JL, Lavilla MJ, Peñarrocha J, Polo R, García-Purriños F, Ramos F, Tomás M, Uzcanga M, Vallejo LÁ, Gavilán J
Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp (Engl Ed) 2020 Mar-Apr;71(2):99-118. Epub 2019 May 13 doi: 10.1016/j.otorri.2018.12.004. PMID: 31097197
Owusu JA, Stewart CM, Boahene K
Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;102(6):1135-1143. Epub 2018 Sep 20 doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2018.06.011. PMID: 30342614
Hohman MH, Hadlock TA
Laryngoscope 2014 Jul;124(7):E283-93. Epub 2014 Jan 15 doi: 10.1002/lary.24542. PMID: 24431233

Therapy

Silva MC, Oliveira MT, Azevedo-Santos IF, DeSantana JM
Braz J Phys Ther 2022 Nov-Dec;26(6):100454. Epub 2022 Oct 17 doi: 10.1016/j.bjpt.2022.100454. PMID: 36279766Free PMC Article
Kim SJ, Lee HY
J Korean Med Sci 2020 Aug 3;35(30):e245. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e245. PMID: 32743989Free PMC Article
Paolucci T, Cardarola A, Colonnelli P, Ferracuti G, Gonnella R, Murgia M, Santilli V, Paoloni M, Bernetti A, Agostini F, Mangone M
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2020 Feb;56(1):58-67. Epub 2019 Mar 27 doi: 10.23736/S1973-9087.19.05757-5. PMID: 30916916
Pereira LM, Obara K, Dias JM, Menacho MO, Lavado EL, Cardoso JR
Clin Rehabil 2011 Jul;25(7):649-58. Epub 2011 Mar 7 doi: 10.1177/0269215510395634. PMID: 21382865
Finsterer J
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2008 Jul;265(7):743-52. Epub 2008 Mar 27 doi: 10.1007/s00405-008-0646-4. PMID: 18368417Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Hadford SP, Genther DJ, Byrne PJ
Facial Plast Surg Clin North Am 2024 Feb;32(1):169-180. Epub 2023 Aug 21 doi: 10.1016/j.fsc.2023.07.003. PMID: 37981412
Paolucci T, Cardarola A, Colonnelli P, Ferracuti G, Gonnella R, Murgia M, Santilli V, Paoloni M, Bernetti A, Agostini F, Mangone M
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2020 Feb;56(1):58-67. Epub 2019 Mar 27 doi: 10.23736/S1973-9087.19.05757-5. PMID: 30916916
Jung J, Park DC, Jung SY, Park MJ, Kim SH, Yeo SG
Acta Otolaryngol 2019 Oct;139(10):934-938. Epub 2019 Aug 20 doi: 10.1080/00016489.2019.1651134. PMID: 31430217
Hohman MH, Hadlock TA
Laryngoscope 2014 Jul;124(7):E283-93. Epub 2014 Jan 15 doi: 10.1002/lary.24542. PMID: 24431233
Holland J, Bernstein J
BMJ Clin Evid 2011 Mar 7;2011 PMID: 21375786Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Backiavathy V, Pal S, Poonam NS, Subramanian N
Indian J Ophthalmol 2022 Jun;70(6):2211. doi: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_1262_22. PMID: 35648031Free PMC Article
Paolucci T, Cardarola A, Colonnelli P, Ferracuti G, Gonnella R, Murgia M, Santilli V, Paoloni M, Bernetti A, Agostini F, Mangone M
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2020 Feb;56(1):58-67. Epub 2019 Mar 27 doi: 10.23736/S1973-9087.19.05757-5. PMID: 30916916
Quesnel AM, Santos F
Otolaryngol Clin North Am 2018 Dec;51(6):1179-1192. Epub 2018 Sep 18 doi: 10.1016/j.otc.2018.07.013. PMID: 30241764
Azizzadeh B, Frisenda JL
Otolaryngol Clin North Am 2018 Dec;51(6):1169-1178. Epub 2018 Aug 28 doi: 10.1016/j.otc.2018.07.012. PMID: 30170699
Hohman MH, Hadlock TA
Laryngoscope 2014 Jul;124(7):E283-93. Epub 2014 Jan 15 doi: 10.1002/lary.24542. PMID: 24431233

Recent systematic reviews

Khan AJ, Szczepura A, Palmer S, Bark C, Neville C, Thomson D, Martin H, Nduka C
Clin Rehabil 2022 Nov;36(11):1424-1449. Epub 2022 Jul 5 doi: 10.1177/02692155221110727. PMID: 35787015Free PMC Article
Wen J, Chen X, Yang Y, Liu J, Li E, Liu J, Zhou Z, Wu W, He K
Am J Chin Med 2021;49(1):1-23. Epub 2020 Dec 26 doi: 10.1142/S0192415X21500014. PMID: 33371816
Kim SJ, Lee HY
J Korean Med Sci 2020 Aug 3;35(30):e245. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e245. PMID: 32743989Free PMC Article
Holland NJ, Bernstein JM
BMJ Clin Evid 2014 Apr 9;2014 PMID: 24717284Free PMC Article
Pereira LM, Obara K, Dias JM, Menacho MO, Lavado EL, Cardoso JR
Clin Rehabil 2011 Jul;25(7):649-58. Epub 2011 Mar 7 doi: 10.1177/0269215510395634. PMID: 21382865

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