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Abdominal pain

MedGen UID:
7803
Concept ID:
C0000737
Sign or Symptom
Synonyms: Abdominal Pain; Abdominal Pains; Pain, Abdominal; Pains, Abdominal
SNOMED CT: Abdominal pain (21522001); AP - Abdominal pain (21522001)
 
HPO: HP:0002027

Definition

An unpleasant sensation characterized by physical discomfort (such as pricking, throbbing, or aching) and perceived to originate in the abdomen. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Hb SS disease
MedGen UID:
287
Concept ID:
C0002895
Disease or Syndrome
Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by intermittent vaso-occlusive events and chronic hemolytic anemia. Vaso-occlusive events result in tissue ischemia leading to acute and chronic pain as well as organ damage that can affect any organ system, including the bones, spleen, liver, brain, lungs, kidneys, and joints. Dactylitis (pain and/or swelling of the hands or feet) is often the earliest manifestation of SCD. In children, the spleen can become engorged with blood cells in a "splenic sequestration." The spleen is particularly vulnerable to infarction and the majority of individuals with SCD who are not on hydroxyurea or transfusion therapy become functionally asplenic in early childhood, increasing their risk for certain types of bacterial infections, primarily encapsulated organisms. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of mortality in SCD. Chronic hemolysis can result in varying degrees of anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis, and delayed growth and sexual maturation as well as activating pathways that contribute to the pathophysiology directly. Individuals with the highest rates of hemolysis are at higher risk for pulmonary artery hypertension, priapism, and leg ulcers and may be relatively protected from vaso-occlusive pain.
Fabry disease
MedGen UID:
8083
Concept ID:
C0002986
Disease or Syndrome
Fabry disease is the most common of the lysosomal storage disorders and results from deficient activity of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (a-Gal A), leading to progressive lysosomal deposition of globotriaosylceramide and its derivatives in cells throughout the body. The classic form, occurring in males with less than 1% a-Gal A enzyme activity, usually has its onset in childhood or adolescence with periodic crises of severe pain in the extremities (acroparesthesia), the appearance of vascular cutaneous lesions (angiokeratomas), sweating abnormalities (anhidrosis, hypohidrosis, and rarely hyperhidrosis), characteristic corneal and lenticular opacities, and proteinuria. Gradual deterioration of renal function to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually occurs in men in the third to fifth decade. In middle age, most males successfully treated for ESRD develop cardiac and/or cerebrovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Heterozygous females typically have milder symptoms at a later age of onset than males. Rarely, females may be relatively asymptomatic throughout a normal life span or may have symptoms as severe as those observed in males with the classic phenotype. In contrast, late-onset forms occur in males with greater than 1% a-Gal A activity. Clinical manifestations include cardiac disease, which usually presents in the sixth to eighth decade with left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia, and proteinuria; renal failure, associated with ESRD but without the skin lesions or pain; or cerebrovascular disease presenting as stroke or transient ischemic attack.
Ulcerative colitis
MedGen UID:
3532
Concept ID:
C0009324
Disease or Syndrome
A chronic inflammatory bowel disease that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon. The main symptom of active disease is usually constant diarrhea mixed with blood, of gradual onset and intermittent periods of exacerbated symptoms contrasting with periods that are relatively symptom-free. In contrast to Crohn's disease this special form of colitis begins in the distal parts of the rectum, spreads continually upwards and affects only mucose and submucose tissue of the colon.
Hereditary fructosuria
MedGen UID:
42105
Concept ID:
C0016751
Disease or Syndrome
Following dietary exposure to fructose, sucrose, or sorbitol, untreated hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is characterized by metabolic disturbances (hypoglycemia, lactic acidemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperuricemia, hypermagnesemia, hyperalaninemia) and clinical findings (nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distress; chronic growth restriction / failure to thrive). While untreated HFI typically first manifested when fructose- and sucrose-containing foods were introduced in the course of weaning young infants from breast milk, it is now presenting earlier, due to the addition of fructose-containing nutrients in infant formulas. If the infant ingests large quantities of fructose, the infant may acutely develop lethargy, seizures, and/or progressive coma. Untreated HFI may result in renal and hepatic failure. If identified and treated before permanent organ injury occurs, individuals with HFI can experience a normal quality of life and life expectancy.
Familial Mediterranean fever
MedGen UID:
45811
Concept ID:
C0031069
Disease or Syndrome
Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is divided into two phenotypes: type 1 and type 2. FMF type 1 is characterized by recurrent short episodes of inflammation and serositis including fever, peritonitis, synovitis, pleuritis, and, rarely, pericarditis and meningitis. The symptoms and severity vary among affected individuals, sometimes even among members of the same family. Amyloidosis, which can lead to renal failure, is the most severe complication, if untreated. FMF type 2 is characterized by amyloidosis as the first clinical manifestation of FMF in an otherwise asymptomatic individual.
Peutz-Jeghers syndrome
MedGen UID:
18404
Concept ID:
C0031269
Disease or Syndrome
Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is characterized by the association of gastrointestinal (GI) polyposis, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and cancer predisposition. PJS-type hamartomatous polyps are most common in the small intestine (in order of prevalence: jejunum, ileum, and duodenum) but can also occur in the stomach, large bowel, and extraintestinal sites including the renal pelvis, bronchus, gall bladder, nasal passages, urinary bladder, and ureters. GI polyps can result in chronic bleeding, anemia, and recurrent obstruction and intussusception requiring repeated laparotomy and bowel resection. Mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation presents in childhood as dark blue to dark brown macules around the mouth, eyes, and nostrils, in the perianal area, and on the buccal mucosa. Hyperpigmented macules on the fingers are common. The macules may fade in puberty and adulthood. Recognition of the distinctive skin manifestations is important especially in individuals who have PJS as the result of a de novo pathogenic variant as these skin findings often predate GI signs and symptoms. Individuals with PJS are at increased risk for a wide variety of epithelial malignancies (colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, breast, and ovarian cancers). Females are at risk for sex cord tumors with annular tubules (SCTAT), a benign neoplasm of the ovaries, and adenoma malignum of the cervix, a rare aggressive cancer. Males occasionally develop large calcifying Sertoli cell tumors of the testes, which secrete estrogen and can lead to gynecomastia, advanced skeletal age, and ultimately short stature, if untreated.
Protein-losing enteropathy
MedGen UID:
19522
Concept ID:
C0033680
Disease or Syndrome
Complement hyperactivation, angiopathic thrombosis, and protein-losing enteropathy (CHAPLE) is characterized by abdominal pain and diarrhea, primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, hypoproteinemic edema, and malabsorption. Some patients also exhibit bowel inflammation, recurrent infections associated with hypogammaglobulinemia, and/or angiopathic thromboembolic disease. Patient T lymphocytes show increased complement activation, causing surface deposition of complement and generating soluble C5a (Ozen et al., 2017).
Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome
MedGen UID:
38966
Concept ID:
C0085083
Disease or Syndrome
A rare non-malformative gynecological disease affecting pre-menopausal women usually following treatment with ovarian stimulating hormones, characterized by ovarian enlargement and, to varying degrees, shift of serum from the intravascular space to the third space, mainly into the peritoneal, pleural, and to a lesser extent to the pericardial cavities. Presenting symptoms include abdomen distention, pain, nausea, and vomiting. Severity ranges from mild to life-threatening and is complicated by increased risk of thrombosis, acute hepato-renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ovarian torsion and rupture.
Cyclical vomiting syndrome
MedGen UID:
57509
Concept ID:
C0152164
Disease or Syndrome
A condition characterized by recurrent, self-limiting episodes of vomiting associated with intense nausea, pallor, and lethargy. It is commonly a migraine precursor.
Hereditary coproporphyria
MedGen UID:
57931
Concept ID:
C0162531
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an acute (hepatic) porphyria in which the acute symptoms are neurovisceral and occur in discrete episodes. Attacks typically start in the abdomen with low-grade pain that slowly increases over a period of days (not hours) with nausea progressing to vomiting. In some individuals, the pain is predominantly in the back or extremities. When an acute attack is untreated, a motor neuropathy may develop over a period of days or a few weeks. The neuropathy first appears as weakness proximally in the arms and legs, then progresses distally to involve the hands and feet. Some individuals experience respiratory insufficiency due to loss of innervation of the diaphragm and muscles of respiration. Acute attacks are associated commonly with use of certain medications, caloric deprivation, and changes in female reproductive hormones. About 20% of those with an acute attack also experience photosensitivity associated with bullae and skin fragility.
Variegate porphyria
MedGen UID:
58118
Concept ID:
C0162532
Disease or Syndrome
Variegate porphyria (VP) is both a cutaneous porphyria (with chronic blistering skin lesions) and an acute porphyria (with severe episodic neurovisceral symptoms). The most common manifestation of VP is adult-onset cutaneous blistering lesions (subepidermal vesicles, bullae, and erosions that crust over and heal slowly) of sun-exposed skin, especially the hands and face. Other chronic skin findings include milia, scarring, thickening, and areas of decreased and increased skin pigmentation. Facial hyperpigmentation and hypertrichosis may occur. Cutaneous manifestations may improve in winter and be less prevalent in northern regions and in dark-skinned individuals. Acute neurovisceral symptoms can occur any time after puberty, but less often in the elderly. Acute manifestations are highly variable, but may be similar from episode to episode in a person with recurrent attacks; not all manifestations are present in a single episode; and acute symptoms may become chronic. Symptoms are more common in women than men. The most common manifestations are abdominal pain; constipation; pain in the back, chest, and extremities; anxiety; seizures; and a primarily motor neuropathy resulting in muscle weakness that may progress to quadriparesis and respiratory paralysis. Psychiatric disturbances and autonomic neuropathy can also be observed. Acute attacks may be severe and are potentially fatal.
Acute intermittent porphyria
MedGen UID:
56452
Concept ID:
C0162565
Disease or Syndrome
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant disorder, occurs in heterozygotes for an HMBS pathogenic variant that causes reduced activity of the enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase. AIP is considered "overt" in a heterozygote who was previously or is currently symptomatic; AIP is considered "latent" in a heterozygote who has never had symptoms, and typically has been identified during molecular genetic testing of at-risk family members. Note that GeneReviews does not use the term "carrier" for an individual who is heterozygous for an autosomal dominant pathogenic variant; GeneReviews reserves the term "carrier" for an individual who is heterozygous for an autosomal recessive disorder and thus is not expected to ever develop manifestations of the disorder. Overt AIP is characterized clinically by life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks of severe abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, and hypertension. Attacks may be complicated by neurologic findings (mental changes, convulsions, and peripheral neuropathy that may progress to respiratory paralysis), and hyponatremia. Acute attacks, which may be provoked by certain drugs, alcoholic beverages, endocrine factors, calorie restriction, stress, and infections, usually resolve within two weeks. Most individuals with AIP have one or a few attacks; about 3%-8% (mainly women) have recurrent attacks (defined as >3 attacks/year) that may persist for years. Other long-term complications are chronic renal failure, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and hypertension. Attacks, which are very rare before puberty, are more common in women than men. Latent AIP. While all individuals heterozygous for an HMBS pathogenic variant that predisposes to AIP are at risk of developing overt AIP, most have latent AIP and never have symptoms.
Hereditary pancreatitis
MedGen UID:
116056
Concept ID:
C0238339
Disease or Syndrome
PRSS1-related hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis (AP) and recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP: >1 episode of AP), with frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP). Manifestations of acute pancreatitis can range from vague abdominal pain lasting one to three days to severe abdominal pain lasting days to weeks and requiring hospitalization.
Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency
MedGen UID:
82772
Concept ID:
C0268120
Disease or Syndrome
Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is characterized by excessive production and renal excretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (DHA), which leads to kidney stone formation and crystal-induced kidney damage (i.e., DHA crystal nephropathy) causing acute kidney injury episodes and progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). Kidney stones, the most common clinical manifestation of APRT deficiency, can occur at any age; in at least 50% of affected persons symptoms do not occur until adulthood. If adequate treatment is not provided, approximately 20%-25% of affected individuals develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD), usually in adult life.
Nonpersistence of intestinal lactase
MedGen UID:
75659
Concept ID:
C0268181
Disease or Syndrome
In humans, the activities of lactase and most of the other digestive hydrolases are maximal at birth. The majority of the world's human population experiences a decline in production of the digestive enzyme lactase-phlorizin hydrolase during maturation, with the age of onset ranging from the toddler years to young adulthood. Due to the reduced lactase level, lactose present in dairy products cannot be digested in the small intestine and instead is fermented by bacteria in the distal ileum and colon. The fermentative products result in symptoms of diarrhea, gas bloat, flatulence, and abdominal pain. However, in a minority of adults, high levels of lactase activity persist in adulthood. Lactase persistence is a heritable autosomal dominant condition that results in a sustained ability to digest the milk sugar lactose throughout adulthood (Olds and Sibley, 2003).
alpha, alpha-Trehalase deficiency
MedGen UID:
75660
Concept ID:
C0268187
Disease or Syndrome
Trehalose is a disaccharide found in mushrooms, algae, and insect hemolymph; mushrooms and products containing baker's yeast are thus the only sources of trehalose in the human diet. The high concentration of trehalose in cryptobiotic plants is responsible for their remarkable ability to go through cycles of desiccation and rehydration without injury. This led to interest by the food industry in the addition of trehalose to foodstuffs to improve the longevity and quality of dried food. However, ingestion of a disaccharide in an individual who cannot digest it results in osmotic diarrhea, abdominal pain, and increased rectal flatulence (summary by Murray et al., 2000). Isolated trehalose intolerance due to deficiency of trehalase (TREH; 275360) is probably rare in adult white Americans (Welsh et al., 1978), but has been estimated at 8% in Greenlanders (Gudmand-Hoyer et al., 1988).
Primary hypomagnesemia
MedGen UID:
120640
Concept ID:
C0268448
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is a progressive renal disorder characterized by excessive urinary Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) excretion. There is progressive loss of kidney function, and in about 50% of cases, the need for renal replacement therapy arises as early as the second decade of life (summary by Muller et al., 2006). Amelogenesis imperfecta may also be present in some patients (Bardet et al., 2016). A similar disorder with renal magnesium wasting, renal failure, and nephrocalcinosis (HOMG5; 248190) is caused by mutations in another tight-junction gene, CLDN19 (610036), and is distinguished by the association of severe ocular involvement. For a discussion of phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of familial hypomagnesemia, see HOMG1 (602014).
Familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia
MedGen UID:
75681
Concept ID:
C0268450
Disease or Syndrome
Gitelman syndrome (GTLMNS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubular salt-wasting disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. It is the most common renal tubular disorder among Caucasians (prevalence of 1 in 40,000). Most patients have onset of symptoms as adults, but some present in childhood. Clinical features include transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, abdominal pains, and chondrocalcinosis (summary by Glaudemans et al., 2012). Gitelman syndrome is sometimes referred to as a mild variant of classic Bartter syndrome (607364). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
5-Oxoprolinase deficiency
MedGen UID:
82814
Concept ID:
C0268525
Disease or Syndrome
5-Oxoprolinuria can be caused by genetic defects in either of 2 enzymes involved in the gamma-glutamyl cycle of glutathione metabolism: glutathione synthetase (GSS; 601002) or 5-oxoprolinase (OPLAH; 614243). GSS deficiency (266130) is best characterized as an inborn error of glutathione metabolism, but there is debate as to whether OPLAH deficiency represents a disorder or simply a biochemical condition with no adverse clinical effects because patients lack a consistent clinical picture apart from 5-oxoprolinuria (summary by Calpena et al., 2013).
Ornithine carbamoyltransferase deficiency
MedGen UID:
75692
Concept ID:
C0268542
Disease or Syndrome
Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency can occur as a severe neonatal-onset disease in males (but rarely in females) and as a post-neonatal-onset (also known as "late-onset" or partial deficiency) disease in males and females. Males with severe neonatal-onset OTC deficiency are asymptomatic at birth but become symptomatic from hyperammonemia in the first week of life, most often on day two to three of life, and are usually catastrophically ill by the time they come to medical attention. After successful treatment of neonatal hyperammonemic coma these infants can easily become hyperammonemic again despite appropriate treatment; they typically require liver transplant to improve quality of life. Males and heterozygous females with post-neonatal-onset (partial) OTC deficiency can present from infancy to later childhood, adolescence, or adulthood. No matter how mild the disease, a hyperammonemic crisis can be precipitated by stressors and become a life-threatening event at any age and in any situation in life. For all individuals with OTC deficiency, typical neuropsychological complications include developmental delay, learning disabilities, intellectual disability, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and executive function deficits.
Cronkhite-Canada syndrome
MedGen UID:
129128
Concept ID:
C0282207
Disease or Syndrome
Cronkhite-Canada syndrome is characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyposis, alopecia, onychodystrophy, skin hyperpigmentation, and diarrhea. It is associated with high morbidity (summary by Sweetser et al., 2012).
Deficiency of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase
MedGen UID:
91001
Concept ID:
C0342793
Disease or Syndrome
Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency is an uncommon inherited metabolic disease. The characteristic phenotype is variable, but may include developmental delay in early childhood, seizures, hypotonia, diarrhea, vomiting, metabolic acidosis, hypoglycemia, ketosis, abnormal urinary compounds, lactic acidemia, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (Sweetman and Williams, 2001).
Juvenile polyposis syndrome
MedGen UID:
87518
Concept ID:
C0345893
Neoplastic Process
Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is characterized by predisposition to hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, specifically in the stomach, small intestine, colon, and rectum. The term "juvenile" refers to the type of polyp rather than to the age of onset of polyps. Most individuals with JPS have some polyps by age 20 years; some may have only four or five polyps over their lifetime, whereas others in the same family may have more than 100. If the polyps are left untreated, they may cause bleeding and anemia. Most juvenile polyps are benign; however, malignant transformation can occur. Risk for GI cancers ranges from 11% to 86%. Most of this increased risk is attributed to colon cancer, but cancers of the stomach, upper GI tract, and pancreas have also been reported. A combined syndrome of JPS and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is present in most individuals with an SMAD4 pathogenic variant.
Hyperimmunoglobulin D with periodic fever
MedGen UID:
140768
Concept ID:
C0398691
Disease or Syndrome
Mevalonate kinase deficiency is a condition characterized by recurrent episodes of fever, which typically begin during infancy. Each episode of fever lasts about 3 to 6 days, and the frequency of the episodes varies among affected individuals. In childhood the fevers seem to be more frequent, occurring as often as 25 times a year, but as the individual gets older the episodes occur less often.\n\nMevalonate kinase deficiency has additional signs and symptoms, and the severity depends on the type of the condition. There are two types of mevalonate kinase deficiency: a less severe type called hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS) and a more severe type called mevalonic aciduria (MVA).\n\nDuring episodes of fever, people with HIDS typically have enlargement of the lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy), abdominal pain, joint pain, diarrhea, skin rashes, and headache. Occasionally they will have painful sores called aphthous ulcers around their mouth. In females, these may also occur around the vagina. Rarely, people with HIDS develop a buildup of protein deposits (amyloidosis) in the kidneys that can lead to kidney failure. Fever episodes in individuals with HIDS can be triggered by vaccinations, surgery, injury, or stress. Most people with HIDS have abnormally high levels of immune system proteins called immunoglobulin D (IgD) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) in the blood. It is unclear why some people with HIDS have high levels of IgD and IgA and some do not. Elevated levels of these immunoglobulins do not appear to cause any signs or symptoms. Individuals with HIDS do not have any signs and symptoms of the condition between fever episodes and typically have a normal life expectancy.\n\nPeople with MVA have signs and symptoms of the condition at all times, not just during episodes of fever. Affected children have developmental delay, problems with movement and balance (ataxia), recurrent seizures (epilepsy), progressive problems with vision, and failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive). Individuals with MVA typically have an unusually small, elongated head. In childhood or adolescence, affected individuals may develop eye problems such as inflammation of the eye (uveitis), a blue tint in the white part of the eye (blue sclera), an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa that causes vision loss, or clouding of the lens of the eye (cataracts). Affected adults may have short stature and may develop muscle weakness (myopathy) later in life. During fever episodes, people with MVA may have an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly), lymphadenopathy, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and skin rashes. Children with MVA who are severely affected with multiple problems may live only into early childhood; mildly affected individuals may have a normal life expectancy.
Cholestasis-pigmentary retinopathy-cleft palate syndrome
MedGen UID:
208652
Concept ID:
C0795969
Disease or Syndrome
MED12-related disorders include the phenotypes of FG syndrome type 1 (FGS1), Lujan syndrome (LS), X-linked Ohdo syndrome (XLOS), Hardikar syndrome (HS), and nonspecific intellectual disability (NSID). FGS1 and LS share the clinical findings of cognitive impairment, hypotonia, and abnormalities of the corpus callosum. FGS1 is further characterized by absolute or relative macrocephaly, tall forehead, downslanted palpebral fissures, small and simple ears, constipation and/or anal anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic behavior. LS is further characterized by large head, tall thin body habitus, long thin face, prominent nasal bridge, high narrow palate, and short philtrum. Carrier females in families with FGS1 and LS are typically unaffected. XLOS is characterized by intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and facial coarsening. HS has been described in females with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, biliary and liver anomalies, intestinal malrotation, pigmentary retinopathy, and coarctation of the aorta. Developmental and cognitive concerns have not been reported in females with HS. Pathogenic variants in MED12 have been reported in an increasing number of males and females with NSID, with affected individuals often having clinical features identified in other MED12-related disorders.
TNF receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS)
MedGen UID:
226899
Concept ID:
C1275126
Disease or Syndrome
Familial periodic fever (FPF) is an autoinflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent fever with localized myalgia and painful erythema. Febrile attacks may last 1 or 2 days but often last longer than 1 week. Arthralgia of large joints, abdominal pain, conjunctivitis, and periorbital edema are common features. During attacks, painless cutaneous lesions may develop on the trunk or extremities and may migrate distally (review by Drenth and van der Meer, 2001).
Sucrase-isomaltase deficiency
MedGen UID:
220924
Concept ID:
C1283620
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital sucrose-isomaltase deficiency (CSID) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by absence of sucrase and most of the maltase digestive activity within the sucrase-isomaltase enzyme complex, with the isomaltase activity varying from absent to normal. The large amounts of unabsorbed disaccharides create osmotic-fermatative diarrhea with symptoms such as vomiting, flatulence, and abdominal pain (summary by Sander et al., 2006).
Infundibulopelvic stenosis-multicystic kidney syndrome
MedGen UID:
318751
Concept ID:
C1832949
Disease or Syndrome
Infundibulopelvic stenosis-multicystic kidney syndrome is a rare, genetic renal malformation syndrome characterized by variable degrees of malformation in the pelvicalyceal system (including unilateral or bilateral calyceal dilatation, infundibular stenosis, hypoplasia or stenosis of the renal pelvis) which lead to multicystic kidney. Clinically it exhibits abdominal, lumbar or flank pain, recurrent urinary tract infections, hypertension, proteinuria and often progresses to renal insufficiency. Calyceal dilatation and hydronephrosis are frequently seen on imaging.
Tropical pancreatitis
MedGen UID:
334069
Concept ID:
C1842402
Disease or Syndrome
A rare pancreatic disease of juvenile onset occurring mainly in tropical developing countries and characterized by chronic non-alcoholic pancreatitis manifesting with abdominal pain, steatorrhea and fibrocalculous pancreatopathy. It is also commonly associated with the development of pancreatic calculi and pancreatic cancer at a much higher frequency than seen in ordinary chronic pancreatitis.
Oculogastrointestinal muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
336376
Concept ID:
C1848586
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare autosomal recessively inherited neuromuscular disease characterised by ocular manifestations such as ptosis and diplopia followed by chronic diarrhoea, malnutrition and intestinal pseudo-obstruction.
Pelger-Huet-like anomaly and episodic fever with abdominal pain
MedGen UID:
376692
Concept ID:
C1850054
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-108 with autoinflammation (IMD108) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized mainly by features of autoinflammation, often manifest as onset of recurrent episodes of abdominal pain associated with fever and elevated inflammatory markers around adolescence. Affected individuals also have recurrent infections, particularly of the skin and nails; poor wound healing; and mild bleeding tendencies. Peripheral blood examination shows hypolobulated neutrophils, suggesting a defect in myeloid differentiation and function. However, neutrophil primary and secondary granules are normal (summary by Goos et al., 2019).
Familial Mediterranean fever, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
341987
Concept ID:
C1851347
Disease or Syndrome
Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is divided into two phenotypes: type 1 and type 2. FMF type 1 is characterized by recurrent short episodes of inflammation and serositis including fever, peritonitis, synovitis, pleuritis, and, rarely, pericarditis and meningitis. The symptoms and severity vary among affected individuals, sometimes even among members of the same family. Amyloidosis, which can lead to renal failure, is the most severe complication, if untreated. FMF type 2 is characterized by amyloidosis as the first clinical manifestation of FMF in an otherwise asymptomatic individual.
Maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 8
MedGen UID:
342845
Concept ID:
C1853297
Disease or Syndrome
Maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 8 (MODY8) is characterized by onset of diabetes before age 25 years, with slowly progressive pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, fatty replacement of pancreatic parenchyma (lipomatosis), and development of pancreatic cysts. Patients do not present clinical signs of chronic pancreatitis (summary by Johansson et al., 2018). For a phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MODY, see 606391.
Celiac disease, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
395227
Concept ID:
C1859310
Finding
Celiac disease is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be associated with gastrointestinal findings (diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain and distension, bloating, vomiting, and weight loss) and/or highly variable non-gastrointestinal findings (dermatitis herpetiformis, chronic fatigue, joint pain/inflammation, iron deficiency anemia, migraines, depression, attention-deficit disorder, epilepsy, osteoporosis/osteopenia, infertility and/or recurrent fetal loss, vitamin deficiencies, short stature, failure to thrive, delayed puberty, dental enamel defects, and autoimmune disorders). Classic celiac disease, characterized by mild to severe gastrointestinal symptoms, is less common than non-classic celiac disease, characterized by absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.
Chylomicronemia, familial, due to circulating inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase
MedGen UID:
348391
Concept ID:
C1861560
Disease or Syndrome
Celiac artery stenosis from compression by median arcuate ligament of diaphragm
MedGen UID:
349361
Concept ID:
C1861783
Disease or Syndrome
Compression of the celiac artery.
Mungan syndrome
MedGen UID:
369554
Concept ID:
C1969653
Disease or Syndrome
Mungan syndrome (MGS) is characterized by chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO), megaduodenum, long-segment Barrett esophagus, and cardiac abnormalities of variable severity (summary by Bonora et al., 2015).
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
435869
Concept ID:
C2673198
Disease or Syndrome
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome-2 (FCAS2) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by episodic and recurrent rash, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia, and headache. In most patients, these episodes are accompanied by fever and serologic evidence of inflammation. Most, but not all, patients report exposure to cold as a trigger for the episodes. Additional features may include abdominal pain, thoracic pain, and sensorineural deafness. The age at onset is variable, ranging from the first year of life to middle age, and the severity and clinical manifestations are heterogeneous (summary by Shen et al., 2017). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, see FCAS1 (120100).
Inflammatory bowel disease 11
MedGen UID:
393069
Concept ID:
C2674051
Disease or Syndrome
An inflammatory bowel disease that has material basis in variation in the chromosome region 7q22.
Hereditary angioedema type 1
MedGen UID:
403466
Concept ID:
C2717906
Disease or Syndrome
A form of hereditary angioedema characterized by acute edema in subcutaneous tissues, viscera and/or the upper airway.
Anemia, nonspherocytic hemolytic, due to G6PD deficiency
MedGen UID:
403555
Concept ID:
C2720289
Disease or Syndrome
G6PD deficiency is the most common genetic cause of chronic and drug-, food-, or infection-induced hemolytic anemia. G6PD catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, which is the only NADPH-generation process in mature red cells; therefore, defense against oxidative damage is dependent on G6PD. Most G6PD-deficient patients are asymptomatic throughout their life, but G6PD deficiency can be life-threatening. The most common clinical manifestations of G6PD deficiency are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which in most patients is triggered by an exogenous agent, e.g., primaquine or fava beans. Acute hemolysis is characterized by fatigue, back pain, anemia, and jaundice. Increased unconjugated bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase, and reticulocytosis are markers of the disorder. The striking similarity between the areas where G6PD deficiency is common and Plasmodium falciparum malaria (see 611162) is endemic provided evidence that G6PD deficiency confers resistance against malaria (summary by Cappellini and Fiorelli, 2008).
Neuroblastoma, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
412713
Concept ID:
C2749485
Finding
Sitosterolemia 1
MedGen UID:
440869
Concept ID:
C2749759
Disease or Syndrome
Sitosterolemia is characterized by: Hypercholesterolemia (especially in children) which (1) shows an unexpected significant lowering of plasma cholesterol level in response to low-fat diet modification or to bile acid sequestrant therapy; or (2) does not respond to statin therapy; Tendon xanthomas or tuberous (i.e., planar) xanthomas that can occur in childhood and in unusual locations (heels, knees, elbows, and buttocks); Premature atherosclerosis, which can lead to angina, aortic valve involvement, myocardial infarction, and sudden death; Hemolytic anemia, abnormally shaped erythrocytes (stomatocytes), and large platelets (macrothrombocytopenia). On occasion, the abnormal hematologic findings may be the initial presentation or the only clinical feature of this disorder. Arthritis, arthralgias, and splenomegaly may sometimes be seen and one study has concluded that "idiopathic" liver disease could be undiagnosed sitosterolemia. The clinical spectrum of sitosterolemia is probably not fully appreciated due to underdiagnosis and the fact that the phenotype in infants is likely to be highly dependent on diet.
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
419514
Concept ID:
C2931875
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Chromosome 19p13.13 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
462244
Concept ID:
C3150894
Disease or Syndrome
19p13.13 deletion syndrome is a condition that results from a chromosomal change in which a small piece of chromosome 19 is deleted in each cell. The deletion occurs on the short (p) arm of the chromosome at a position designated p13.13.\n\nFeatures commonly associated with this chromosomal change include an unusually large head size (macrocephaly), tall stature, and intellectual disability that is usually moderate in severity. Many affected individuals have significantly delayed development, including speech, and children may speak few or no words. Weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and problems with coordinating muscle movement (ataxia) contribute to delays in gross motor skills (such as sitting and walking) and fine motor skills (such as holding a pencil).\n\nOther signs and symptoms that can occur with 19p13.13 deletion syndrome include seizures, abnormalities of brain structure, and mild differences in facial features (such as a prominent forehead). Many affected individuals have problems with feeding and digestion, including constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Eye problems that can impair vision are also common. These include eyes that do not point in the same direction (strabismus) and underdevelopment of the optic nerves, which carry visual information from the eyes to the brain.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of 19p13.13 deletion syndrome vary among affected individuals. In part, this variation occurs because the size of the deletion, and the number of genes it affects, varies from person to person.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 4b
MedGen UID:
462264
Concept ID:
C3150914
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-positive, type 3
MedGen UID:
462759
Concept ID:
C3151409
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Hemochromatosis type 1
MedGen UID:
854011
Concept ID:
C3469186
Disease or Syndrome
HFE hemochromatosis is characterized by inappropriately high absorption of iron by the small intestinal mucosa. The phenotypic spectrum of HFE hemochromatosis includes: Persons with clinical HFE hemochromatosis, in whom manifestations of end-organ damage secondary to iron overload are present; Individuals with biochemical HFE hemochromatosis, in whom transferrin-iron saturation is increased and the only evidence of iron overload is increased serum ferritin concentration; and Non-expressing p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes, in whom neither clinical manifestations of HFE hemochromatosis nor iron overload are present. Clinical HFE hemochromatosis is characterized by excessive storage of iron in the liver, skin, pancreas, heart, joints, and anterior pituitary gland. In untreated individuals, early symptoms include: abdominal pain, weakness, lethargy, weight loss, arthralgias, diabetes mellitus; and increased risk of cirrhosis when the serum ferritin is higher than 1,000 ng/mL. Other findings may include progressive increase in skin pigmentation, congestive heart failure, and/or arrhythmias, arthritis, and hypogonadism. Clinical HFE hemochromatosis is more common in men than women.
Congenital diarrhea 6
MedGen UID:
766184
Concept ID:
C3553270
Disease or Syndrome
Diarrhea-6 is a relatively mild, early-onset chronic diarrhea that may be associated with increased susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease, small bowel obstruction, and esophagitis (Fiskerstrand et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of diarrhea, see DIAR1 (214700).
Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria 2
MedGen UID:
815699
Concept ID:
C3809369
Disease or Syndrome
Any paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PIGT gene.
Vasculitis due to ADA2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2.
Polyglucosan body myopathy type 1
MedGen UID:
863042
Concept ID:
C4014605
Disease or Syndrome
Polyglucosan body myopathy-1 (PGBM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset in childhood of progressive proximal muscle weakness, resulting in difficulties in ambulation. Most patients also develop progressive dilated cardiomyopathy, which may necessitate cardiac transplant in severe cases. A small subset of patients present with severe immunodeficiency and a hyperinflammatory state in very early childhood (summary by Boisson et al., 2012 and Nilsson et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Polyglucosan Body Myopathy See also PGBM2 (616199), caused by mutation in the GYG1 gene (603942) on chromosome 3q24.
Hyperphosphatasia with intellectual disability syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
906509
Concept ID:
C4225201
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperphosphatasia with impaired intellectual development syndrome-6 (HPMRS6) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by global developmental delay, dysmorphic features, seizures, and congenital cataracts. Severity is variable, and the disorder may show a range of phenotypic and biochemical abnormalities, including increased serum alkaline phosphatase levels (summary by Ilkovski et al., 2015). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HPMRS, see HPMRS1 (239300). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Infantile-onset periodic fever-panniculitis-dermatosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
934581
Concept ID:
C4310614
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation, panniculitis, and dermatosis syndrome (AIPDS) is an autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disease characterized by neonatal onset of recurrent fever, erythematous rash with painful nodules, painful joints, and lipodystrophy. Additional features may include diarrhea, increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocytosis, and neutrophilia in the absence of any infection. Patients exhibit no overt primary immunodeficiency (Damgaard et al., 2016 and Zhou et al., 2016).
Yao syndrome
MedGen UID:
934587
Concept ID:
C4310620
Disease or Syndrome
Yao syndrome (YAOS) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by periodic fever, dermatitis, arthritis, and swelling of the distal extremities, as well as gastrointestinal and sicca-like symptoms. The disorder is associated with specific NOD2 variants (and Shen, 2017).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1631838
Concept ID:
C4551995
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) disease is characterized by progressive gastrointestinal dysmotility (manifesting as early satiety, nausea, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, postprandial emesis, episodic abdominal pain and/or distention, and diarrhea); cachexia; ptosis/ophthalmoplegia or ophthalmoparesis; leukoencephalopathy; and demyelinating peripheral neuropathy (manifesting as paresthesias (tingling, numbness, and pain) and symmetric and distal weakness more prominently affecting the lower extremities). The order in which manifestations appear is unpredictable. Onset is usually between the first and fifth decades; in about 60% of individuals, symptoms begin before age 20 years.
Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome 1, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1648470
Concept ID:
C4721531
Disease or Syndrome
STAT3 hyper IgE syndrome (STAT3-HIES) is a primary immune deficiency syndrome characterized by elevated serum IgE, eczema, and recurrent skin and respiratory tract infections, together with several nonimmune features. This disorder typically manifests in the newborn period with a rash (often diagnosed as eosinophilic pustulosis) that subsequently evolves into an eczematoid dermatitis. Recurrent staphylococcal skin boils and bacterial pneumonias usually manifest in the first years of life. Pneumatoceles and bronchiectasis often result from aberrant healing of pneumonias. Mucocutaneous candidiasis is common. Nonimmune features may include retained primary teeth, scoliosis, bone fractures following minimal trauma, joint hyperextensibility, and characteristic facial appearance, which typically emerges in adolescence. Vascular abnormalities have been described and include middle-sized artery tortuosity and aneurysms, with infrequent clinical sequelae of myocardial infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal dysmotility, and spontaneous intestinal perforations (some of which are associated with diverticuli). Fungal infections of the GI tract (typically histoplasmosis, Cryptococcus, and Coccidioides) also occur infrequently. Survival is typically into adulthood, with most individuals now living into or past the sixth decade. Most deaths are associated with gram-negative (Pseudomonas) or filamentous fungal pneumonias resulting in hemoptysis. Lymphomas occur at an increased frequency.
Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach
MedGen UID:
1657285
Concept ID:
C4749917
Neoplastic Process
APC-associated polyposis conditions include (classic or attenuated) familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS). FAP is a colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition syndrome that can manifest in either classic or attenuated form. Classic FAP is characterized by hundreds to thousands of adenomatous colonic polyps, beginning on average at age 16 years (range 7-36 years). For those with the classic form of FAP, 95% of individuals have polyps by age 35 years; CRC is inevitable without colectomy. The mean age of CRC diagnosis in untreated individuals is 39 years (range 34-43 years). The attenuated form is characterized by multiple colonic polyps (average of 30), more proximally located polyps, and a diagnosis of CRC at a later age than in classic FAP. For those with an attenuated form, there is a 70% lifetime risk of CRC and the mean age of diagnosis is 50-55 years. Extracolonic manifestations are variably present and include polyps of the stomach and duodenum, osteomas, dental abnormalities, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), benign cutaneous lesions, desmoid tumors, adrenal masses, and other associated cancers. GAPPS is characterized by proximal gastric polyposis, increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, and no duodenal or colonic involvement in most individuals reported.
GCGR-related hyperglucagonemia
MedGen UID:
1677024
Concept ID:
C4763635
Disease or Syndrome
Mahvash disease (MVAH) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by inactivating mutations in the glucagon receptor, leading to alpha-cell hyperplasia of the pancreas, hyperglucagonemia without glucagonoma syndrome, and occasional hypoglycemia. The disease may lead to glucagonomas and/or primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs).
Autoinflammation with episodic fever and lymphadenopathy
MedGen UID:
1719052
Concept ID:
C5394286
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation with episodic fever and lymphadenopathy (AIEFL) is an autosomal dominant immunologic disorder characterized by onset of recurrent episodes of unexplained fever beginning in early infancy. The episodes occur in a cyclic pattern with a frequency of every week or every few weeks and a duration of several days. Patients have accompanying lymphadenopathy, and some may have hepatosplenomegaly. Rash and genital ulcers are not observed. Patient serum shows increased levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL6 (147620) and TNF (191160), consistent with abnormal activation of the innate inflammatory system. Treatment with anti-IL6R (147880) antibodies may result in clinical improvement (summary by Lalaoui et al., 2020).
Inflammatory bowel disease 30
MedGen UID:
1737985
Concept ID:
C5436750
Disease or Syndrome
Inflammatory bowel disease-30 (IBD30) is characterized by abdominal pain and watery or bloody diarrhea, with changes in the intestinal tract consistent with Crohn disease (Mao et al., 2018). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), see IBD1 (266600).
Visceral myopathy 1
MedGen UID:
1785391
Concept ID:
C5542197
Disease or Syndrome
ACTG2 visceral myopathy is a disorder of smooth muscle dysfunction of the bladder and gastrointestinal system with phenotypic spectrum that ranges from mild to severe. Bladder involvement can range from neonatal megacystis and megaureter (with its most extreme form of prune belly syndrome) at the more severe end, to recurrent urinary tract infections and bladder dysfunction at the milder end. Intestinal involvement can range from malrotation, neonatal manifestations of microcolon, megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome, and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) in neonates at the more severe end to intermittent abdominal distention and functional intestinal obstruction at the milder end. Affected infants (with or without evidence of intestinal malrotation) often present with feeding intolerance and findings of non-mechanical bowel obstruction that persist after successful surgical correction of malrotation. Individuals who develop manifestations of CIPO in later childhood or adulthood often experience episodic waxing and waning of bowel motility. They may undergo frequent abdominal surgeries (perhaps related to malrotation or adhesions causing mechanical obstruction) resulting in resection of dilated segments of bowel, often becoming dependent on total parenteral nutrition (TPN).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 90
MedGen UID:
1786502
Concept ID:
C5542345
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-90 (DEE90) is an X-linked neurologic disorder characterized by onset of refractory seizures in the first days or months of life. Although most patients have focal seizures associated with oromotor automatisms and apnea, various seizure types may occur, including epileptic spasms, generalized tonic-clonic, and absence. EEG shows multifocal discharges; hypsarrhythmia, intermittent burst suppression, and slow spike-wave background resembling Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may also be observed. Affected individuals have global developmental delay with variable severity, but it is usually profound or severe. Some are unable to walk or speak, whereas others may achieve some milestones and show autistic features (summary by Fry et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Angioedema, hereditary, 8
MedGen UID:
1780930
Concept ID:
C5543528
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary angioedema-8 (HAE8) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized clinically by recurrent and self-limited episodes of localized edema in various organs, including the face, tongue, larynx, and extremities. In rare cases, swelling of the tongue or larynx can lead to airway obstruction. Abdominal attacks may also occur, resulting in abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. The disorder results from enhanced vascular permeability (summary by Bork et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HAE, see 106100.
Osteootohepatoenteric syndrome
MedGen UID:
1785846
Concept ID:
C5543557
Disease or Syndrome
Osteootohepatoenteric syndrome (OOHE) is characterized by a variable combination of bone fragility, hearing loss, cholestasis, and congenital diarrhea. Some patients also display mild developmental delay and intellectual disability (Esteve et al., 2018).
Immunodeficiency 82 with systemic inflammation
MedGen UID:
1781752
Concept ID:
C5543581
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-82 with systemic inflammation (IMD82) is a complex autosomal dominant immunologic disorder characterized by recurrent infections with various organisms, as well as noninfectious inflammation manifest as lymphocytic organ infiltration with gastritis, colitis, and lung, liver, CNS, or skin disease. One of the more common features is inflammation of the stomach and bowel. Most patients develop symptoms in infancy or early childhood; the severity is variable. There may be accompanying fever, elevated white blood cell count, decreased B cells, hypogammaglobulinemia, increased C-reactive protein (CRP; 123260), and a generalized hyperinflammatory state. Immunologic workup shows variable B- and T-cell abnormalities such as skewed subgroups. Patients have a propensity for the development of lymphoma, usually in adulthood. At the molecular level, the disorder results from a gain-of-function mutation that leads to constitutive and enhanced activation of the intracellular inflammatory signaling pathway. Treatment with SYK inhibitors rescued human cell abnormalities and resulted in clinical improvement in mice (Wang et al., 2021).
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794167
Concept ID:
C5561957
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities (DDISBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from early childhood. Intellectual disability can range from mild to severe. Additional variable features may include dysmorphic facial features, seizures, hypotonia, motor abnormalities such as Tourette syndrome or dystonia, and hearing loss (summary by Cousin et al., 2021).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 28
MedGen UID:
1800504
Concept ID:
C5569081
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-28 (COXPD28) is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The phenotype is variable, but includes episodic metabolic decompensation beginning in infancy that can result in mild muscle weakness, cardiorespiratory insufficiency, developmental delay, or even death. Biochemical studies of patient tissues show variable mitochondrial defects, including decreased activities of respiratory chain enzymes (summary by Kishita et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Autoinflammatory syndrome, familial, X-linked, Behcet-like 2
MedGen UID:
1808082
Concept ID:
C5575495
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked familial Behcet-like autoinflammatory syndrome-2 (AIFBL2) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by the onset of inflammatory symptoms in the first decade of life in male patients. Affected males often present with oral mucosal ulceration and skin inflammation. More variable features may include gastrointestinal ulceration, arthritis, recurrent fevers, and iron deficiency anemia. Laboratory studies are consistent with immune dysregulation manifest as increased inflammatory markers and variable immune cell abnormalities, such as decreased NK cells and low memory B cells. One patient presented with recurrent infections and immunodeficiency in addition to autoinflammation. The disorder results from a defect in ELF4, which normally acts as a negative regulator of inflammatory disease. Symptoms may respond to blockade of IL1 (see 147760) or TNFA (191160) (summary by Tyler et al., 2021 and Sun et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of AIFBL, see AIFBL1 (616744).
Immunodeficiency 97 with autoinflammation
MedGen UID:
1802936
Concept ID:
C5676946
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-97 with autoinflammation (IMD97) is an autosomal recessive complex immunologic disorder with variable features. Affected individuals present in the first decade of life with inflammatory interstitial lung disease or colitis due to abnormal tissue infiltration by activated T cells. Patients develop autoimmune cytopenias and may have lymphadenopathy; 1 reported patient had features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH; see FHL1, 267700). Some patients may have recurrent infections associated with mild lymphopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and NK cell dysfunction. Immunologic workup indicates signs of significant immune dysregulation with elevation of inflammatory serum markers, variable immune cell defects involving neutrophils, NK cells, and myeloid cells, and disrupted levels of T regulatory cells (Tregs). Two unrelated patients have been reported (summary by Takeda et al., 2019 and Thian et al., 2020).
Mitochondrial complex 3 deficiency, nuclear type 11
MedGen UID:
1824032
Concept ID:
C5774259
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 11 (MC3DN11) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of severe lactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, hypoglycemia, and encephalopathy (Vidali et al., 2021) For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex III deficiency, see MC3DN1 (124000).
Muscular dystrophy, congenital, with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1824047
Concept ID:
C5774274
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy with or without seizures (MYOS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe muscle hypotonia apparent from birth, as well as developmental delay. Laboratory studies show increased serum creatine kinase and muscle biopsy shows nonspecific dystrophic features. Most patients develop seizures or have abnormal epileptiform findings on EEG studies; other variable findings may include feeding difficulties, nystagmus, myopathic facies, areflexia, and brain atrophy on MRI (summary by Larson et al., 2018 and Henige et al., 2021).
Thyroid hormone metabolism, abnormal, 3
MedGen UID:
1824065
Concept ID:
C5774292
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormal thyroid hormone metabolism-3 (THMA3) is characterized by euthyroid hyperthyroxinemia, with elevated free T4 and reverse T3 levels, and normal TSH (see 188540) and free T3 levels. Patients also show low plasma selenium levels and reduced levels of stress-related selenoproteins (Schoenmakers et al., 2016; Geslot et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of abnormal thyroid hormone metabolism, see THMA1 (609698).
Autoinflammatory disease, systemic, with vasculitis
MedGen UID:
1841161
Concept ID:
C5830525
Disease or Syndrome
Systemic autoinflammatory disease with vasculitis (SAIDV) is an autosomal dominant disorder that manifests soon after birth with features such as purpuric skin rash, fever, hepatosplenomegaly, and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP; 123260). Laboratory studies may show leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and autoantibodies. A subset of patients develop progressive liver involvement that may result in fibrosis. Other systemic features, such as periorbital edema, conjunctivitis, infections, abdominal pain, and arthralgia are usually observed. Mutations occur de novo. De Jesus et al. (2023) referred to this disorder as LAVLI (LYN kinase-associated vasculopathy and liver fibrosis).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Szatmary P, Grammatikopoulos T, Cai W, Huang W, Mukherjee R, Halloran C, Beyer G, Sutton R
Drugs 2022 Aug;82(12):1251-1276. Epub 2022 Sep 8 doi: 10.1007/s40265-022-01766-4. PMID: 36074322Free PMC Article
Beyer G, Hoffmeister A, Lorenz P, Lynen P, Lerch MM, Mayerle J
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2022 Jul 25;119(29-30):495-501. doi: 10.3238/arztebl.m2022.0223. PMID: 35945698Free PMC Article
Camilleri M
JAMA 2021 Mar 2;325(9):865-877. doi: 10.1001/jama.2020.22532. PMID: 33651094

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Kamal HY, Morneault-Gill K, Chadwick CB
Curr Opin Pediatr 2023 Oct 1;35(5):574-578. Epub 2023 Aug 4 doi: 10.1097/MOP.0000000000001280. PMID: 37540073
Brenner DM, Lacy BE
Am J Gastroenterol 2021 Aug 1;116(8):1587-1600. doi: 10.14309/ajg.0000000000001266. PMID: 33993133Free PMC Article
Firat N, Mantoglu B, Akin E, Bas E, Altintoprak F
Pol Przegl Chir 2021 Mar 31;93(3):1-5. doi: 10.5604/01.3001.0014.8220. PMID: 33949333
Cartwright SL, Knudson MP
Am Fam Physician 2008 Apr 1;77(7):971-8. PMID: 18441863
Chen EH, Shofer FS, Dean AJ, Hollander JE, Baxt WG, Robey JL, Sease KL, Mills AM
Acad Emerg Med 2008 May;15(5):414-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2008.00100.x. PMID: 18439195

Diagnosis

Lukic S, Mijac D, Filipovic B, Sokic-Milutinovic A, Tomasevic R, Krstic M, Milosavljevic T
Dig Dis 2022;40(2):181-186. Epub 2021 May 4 doi: 10.1159/000516977. PMID: 33946069
Sabo CM, Grad S, Dumitrascu DL
Dig Dis 2021;39(6):606-614. Epub 2021 Feb 25 doi: 10.1159/000515433. PMID: 33631744
Natesan S, Lee J, Volkamer H, Thoureen T
Emerg Med Clin North Am 2016 May;34(2):165-90. doi: 10.1016/j.emc.2015.12.008. PMID: 27133239
Falch C, Vicente D, Häberle H, Kirschniak A, Müller S, Nissan A, Brücher BL
Eur J Pain 2014 Aug;18(7):902-13. Epub 2014 Jan 22 doi: 10.1002/j.1532-2149.2014.00456.x. PMID: 24449533
Cartwright SL, Knudson MP
Am Fam Physician 2008 Apr 1;77(7):971-8. PMID: 18441863

Therapy

Black CJ, Thakur ER, Houghton LA, Quigley EMM, Moayyedi P, Ford AC
Gut 2020 Aug;69(8):1441-1451. Epub 2020 Apr 10 doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2020-321191. PMID: 32276950
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Prognosis

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