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Pes cavus

MedGen UID:
675590
Concept ID:
C0728829
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: Cavus foot; Clawfoot; Congenital cavus foot; Congenital pes cavus; Contracted foot; High-arched foot; Talipes cavus; Talipes plantaris
SNOMED CT: Congenital cavus foot (205091006); Congenital pes cavus (205091006); Talipes plantaris (36755004); Contracted foot (36755004); Clawfoot (36755004); Talipes cavus (36755004); Pes cavus (36755004)
 
HPO: HP:0001761

Definition

An increase in height of the medial longitudinal arch of the foot that does not flatten on weight bearing (i.e., a distinctly hollow form of the sole of the foot when it is bearing weight). [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVPes cavus

Conditions with this feature

Dejerine-Sottas disease
MedGen UID:
3710
Concept ID:
C0011195
Disease or Syndrome
Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy is a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy with onset in infancy. It can show autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. Affected individuals have delayed motor development due to severe distal motor and sensory impairment, resulting in difficulties in gait. Some patients have generalized hypotonia in infancy. Other features may include pes cavus, scoliosis, and sensory ataxia. Nerve conduction velocities are severely decreased (sometimes less than 10 m/s), and sural nerve biopsy shows severe loss of myelinated fibers (summary by Baets et al., 2011).
Marfan syndrome
MedGen UID:
44287
Concept ID:
C0024796
Disease or Syndrome
FBN1-related Marfan syndrome (Marfan syndrome), a systemic disorder of connective tissue with a high degree of clinical variability, comprises a broad phenotypic continuum ranging from mild (features of Marfan syndrome in one or a few systems) to severe and rapidly progressive neonatal multiorgan disease. Cardinal manifestations involve the ocular, skeletal, and cardiovascular systems. Ocular findings include myopia (>50% of affected individuals); ectopia lentis (seen in approximately 60% of affected individuals); and an increased risk for retinal detachment, glaucoma, and early cataracts. Skeletal system manifestations include bone overgrowth and joint laxity; disproportionately long extremities for the size of the trunk (dolichostenomelia); overgrowth of the ribs that can push the sternum in (pectus excavatum) or out (pectus carinatum); and scoliosis that ranges from mild to severe and progressive. The major morbidity and early mortality in Marfan syndrome relate to the cardiovascular system and include dilatation of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva (predisposing to aortic tear and rupture), mitral valve prolapse with or without regurgitation, tricuspid valve prolapse, and enlargement of the proximal pulmonary artery. Severe and prolonged regurgitation of the mitral and/or aortic valve can predispose to left ventricular dysfunction and occasionally heart failure. With proper management, the life expectancy of someone with Marfan syndrome approximates that of the general population.
Multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 2b
MedGen UID:
9959
Concept ID:
C0025269
Neoplastic Process
Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) includes the following phenotypes: MEN2A, FMTC (familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, which may be a variant of MEN2A), and MEN2B. All three phenotypes involve high risk for development of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC); MEN2A and MEN2B involve an increased risk for pheochromocytoma; MEN2A involves an increased risk for parathyroid adenoma or hyperplasia. Additional features in MEN2B include mucosal neuromas of the lips and tongue, distinctive facies with enlarged lips, ganglioneuromatosis of the gastrointestinal tract, and a marfanoid habitus. MTC typically occurs in early childhood in MEN2B, early adulthood in MEN2A, and middle age in FMTC.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-II
MedGen UID:
7734
Concept ID:
C0026705
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II; also known as Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked multisystem disorder characterized by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation. The vast majority of affected individuals are male; on rare occasion heterozygous females manifest findings. Age of onset, disease severity, and rate of progression vary significantly among affected males. In those with early progressive disease, CNS involvement (manifest primarily by progressive cognitive deterioration), progressive airway disease, and cardiac disease usually result in death in the first or second decade of life. In those with slowly progressive disease, the CNS is not (or is minimally) affected, although the effect of GAG accumulation on other organ systems may be early progressive to the same degree as in those who have progressive cognitive decline. Survival into the early adult years with normal intelligence is common in the slowly progressing form of the disease. Additional findings in both forms of MPS II include: short stature; macrocephaly with or without communicating hydrocephalus; macroglossia; hoarse voice; conductive and sensorineural hearing loss; hepatosplenomegaly; dysostosis multiplex; spinal stenosis; and carpal tunnel syndrome.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-I-S
MedGen UID:
6453
Concept ID:
C0026708
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common.
Pelger-Huët anomaly
MedGen UID:
10617
Concept ID:
C0030779
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant inherited condition caused by mutations in the lamin B receptor gene. It is characterized by defects in the neutrophil lobulation, resulting in the presence of dumbbell-shaped neutrophils with bilobed nuclei in the peripheral blood smear.
Phytanic acid storage disease
MedGen UID:
11161
Concept ID:
C0034960
Disease or Syndrome
Adult Refsum disease (ARD is associated with elevated plasma phytanic acid levels, late childhood-onset (or later) retinitis pigmentosa, and variable combinations of anosmia, polyneuropathy, deafness, ataxia, and ichthyosis. Onset of symptoms ranges from age seven months to older than age 50 years. Cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure caused by cardiomyopathy are potentially severe health problems that develop later in life.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-D
MedGen UID:
88602
Concept ID:
C0086650
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disease characterized by progressive central nervous system degeneration manifest as severe intellectual disability (ID), developmental regression, and other neurologic manifestations including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), behavioral problems, and sleep disturbances. Disease onset is typically before age ten years. Disease course may be rapidly or slowly progressive; some individuals with an extremely attenuated disease course present in mid-to-late adulthood with early-onset dementia with or without a history of ID. Systemic manifestations can include musculoskeletal problems (joint stiffness, contractures, scoliosis, and hip dysplasia), hearing loss, respiratory tract and sinopulmonary infections, and cardiac disease (valvular thickening, defects in the cardiac conduction system). Neurologic decline is seen in all affected individuals; however, clinical severity varies within and among the four MPS III subtypes (defined by the enzyme involved) and even among members of the same family. Death usually occurs in the second or third decade of life secondary to neurologic regression or respiratory tract infections.
Roussy-Lévy syndrome
MedGen UID:
64430
Concept ID:
C0205713
Disease or Syndrome
Roussy-Levy syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by early onset of prominent ataxia followed by late onset of mild motor involvement. Symptoms progress very slowly, and affected individuals may remain ambulatory throughout life (Auer-Grumbach et al., 1998; Plante-Bordeneuve et al., 1999).
Weaver syndrome
MedGen UID:
120511
Concept ID:
C0265210
Disease or Syndrome
EZH2-related overgrowth includes EZH2-related Weaver syndrome at one end of the spectrum and tall stature at the other. Although most individuals diagnosed with a heterozygous EZH2 pathogenic variant have been identified because of a clinical suspicion of Weaver syndrome, a minority have been identified through molecular genetic testing of family members of probands or individuals with overgrowth who did not have a clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome. Thus, the extent of the phenotypic spectrum associated with a heterozygous EZH2 pathogenic variant is not yet known. Weaver syndrome is characterized by tall stature, variable intellect (ranging from normal intellect to severe intellectual disability), characteristic facial appearance, and a range of associated clinical features including advanced bone age, poor coordination, soft doughy skin, camptodactyly of the fingers and/or toes, umbilical hernia, abnormal tone, and hoarse low cry in infancy. Brain MRI has identified abnormalities in a few individuals with EZH2-related overgrowth. Neuroblastoma occurs at a slightly increased frequency in individuals with a heterozygous EZH2 pathogenic variant but data are insufficient to determine absolute risk. There is currently no evidence that additional malignancies (including hematologic malignancies) occur with increased frequency.
Autosomal dominant keratitis-ichthyosis-hearing loss syndrome
MedGen UID:
120536
Concept ID:
C0265336
Disease or Syndrome
Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare ectodermal dysplasia characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, photophobia and corneal vascularization, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, erythrokeratoderma, follicular hyperkeratosis, and recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. A subset of patients with KID may develop multiple cystic pilar tumors, which are prone to malignant transformation and metastasis (Nyquist et al., 2007). Vohwinkel syndrome (124500) is an allelic disorder involving congenital deafness with keratopachydermia and constrictions of fingers and toes. Another similar disorder caused by mutation in GJB2 is palmoplantar keratoderma with deafness (148350). Genetic Heterogeneity of Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness Syndrome An autosomal recessive form of KID syndrome (KIDAR; 242150) is caused by mutation in the AP1B1 gene (600157) on chromosome 22q12.
Xeroderma pigmentosum group A
MedGen UID:
82775
Concept ID:
C0268135
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Xeroderma pigmentosum, group G
MedGen UID:
75657
Concept ID:
C0268141
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
GM1 gangliosidosis type 3
MedGen UID:
78655
Concept ID:
C0268273
Disease or Syndrome
GLB1-related disorders comprise two phenotypically distinct lysosomal storage disorders: GM1 gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis type IVB (MPS IVB). The phenotype of GM1 gangliosidosis constitutes a spectrum ranging from severe (infantile) to intermediate (late-infantile and juvenile) to mild (chronic/adult). Type I (infantile) GM1 gangliosidosis begins before age 12 months. Prenatal manifestations may include nonimmune hydrops fetalis, intrauterine growth restriction, and placental vacuolization; congenital dermal melanocytosis (Mongolian spots) may be observed. Macular cherry-red spot is detected on eye exam. Progressive central nervous system dysfunction leads to spasticity and rapid regression; blindness, deafness, decerebrate rigidity, seizures, feeding difficulties, and oral secretions are observed. Life expectancy is two to three years. Type II can be subdivided into the late-infantile (onset age 1-3 years) and juvenile (onset age 3-10 years) phenotypes. Central nervous system dysfunction manifests as progressive cognitive, motor, and speech decline as measured by psychometric testing. There may be mild corneal clouding, hepatosplenomegaly, and/or cardiomyopathy; the typical course is characterized by progressive neurologic decline, progressive skeletal disease in some individuals (including kyphosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral heads), and progressive feeding difficulties leading to aspiration risk. Type III begins in late childhood to the third decade with generalized dystonia leading to unsteady gait and speech disturbance followed by extrapyramidal signs including akinetic-rigid parkinsonism. Cardiomyopathy develops in some and skeletal involvement occurs in most. Intellectual impairment is common late in the disease with prognosis directly related to the degree of neurologic impairment. MPS IVB is characterized by skeletal dysplasia with specific findings of axial and appendicular dysostosis multiplex, short stature (below 15th centile in adults), kyphoscoliosis, coxa/genu valga, joint laxity, platyspondyly, and odontoid hypoplasia. First signs and symptoms may be apparent at birth. Bony involvement is progressive, with more than 84% of adults requiring ambulation aids; life span does not appear to be limited. Corneal clouding is detected in some individuals and cardiac valvular disease may develop.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type IA
MedGen UID:
75727
Concept ID:
C0270911
Disease or Syndrome
For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200). CMT1A is the most common form of CMT. The average age of onset of clinical symptoms is 12.2 +/- 7.3 years. Slow nerve conduction velocity (NCV) less than 38 m/s is highly diagnostic and is a 100% penetrant phenotype independent of age (Lupski et al., 1991, 1992).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B
MedGen UID:
124377
Concept ID:
C0270912
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a sensorineural peripheral polyneuropathy. Affecting approximately 1 in 2,500 individuals, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system (Skre, 1974). Autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms have been recognized. Classification On the basis of electrophysiologic properties and histopathology, CMT has been divided into primary peripheral demyelinating (type 1, or HMSNI) and primary peripheral axonal (type 2, or HMSNII) neuropathies. The demyelinating neuropathies classified as CMT type 1 are characterized by severely reduced motor NCVs (less than 38 m/s) and segmental demyelination and remyelination with onion bulb formations on nerve biopsy. The axonal neuropathies classified as CMT type 2 are characterized by normal or mildly reduced NCVs and chronic axonal degeneration and regeneration on nerve biopsy (see CMT2A1; 118210). Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) (see 158590), or spinal CMT, is characterized by exclusive motor involvement and sparing of sensory nerves (Pareyson, 1999). McAlpine (1989) proposed that the forms of CMT with very slow nerve conduction be given the gene symbol CMT1A (118220) and CMT1B, CMT1A being the gene on chromosome 17 and CMT1B being the gene on chromosome 1. CMT2 was the proposed symbol for the autosomal locus responsible for the moderately slow nerve conduction form of the disease (axonal). For a phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of the various subtypes of CMT, see CMTX1 (302800), CMT2A1 (118210), CMT3 (DSS; 145900), CMT4A (214400), and CMTDIB (606482). Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Dominant Demyelinating CMT1 Autosomal dominant demyelinating CMT1 is a genetically heterogeneous disorder and can be caused by mutations in different genes; see CMT1A (118220), CMT1C (601098), CMT1D (607678), CMT1E (607734), CMT1F (607734), CMT1G (618279), CMT1H (619764), CMT1I (619742), and CMT1J (620111). See also 608236 for a related phenotype characterized by isolated slowed nerve conduction velocities (NCVs).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1C
MedGen UID:
75728
Concept ID:
C0270913
Disease or Syndrome
For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200).
Landau-Kleffner syndrome
MedGen UID:
79465
Concept ID:
C0282512
Disease or Syndrome
GRIN2A-related speech disorders and epilepsy are characterized by speech disorders in all affected individuals and a range of epilepsy syndromes present in about 90%. Severe speech disorders observed can include dysarthria and speech dyspraxia, and both receptive and expressive language delay/regression; more mildly affected individuals may display subtly impaired intelligibility of conversational speech. Epilepsy features include seizure onset usually between ages three and six years, focal epilepsy with language and/or global developmental regression, and electroencephalogram (EEG) showing continuous spike-and-wave discharges in sleep or very active centrotemporal discharges. Seizure types include seizures associated with aura of perioral paresthesia, focal or focal motor seizures (often evolving to generalized tonic-clonic), and atypical absence seizures. Epilepsy syndromes can include: Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-wave during sleep (ECSWS), childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (CECTS), atypical childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (ACECTS), autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy with speech dyspraxia (ADRESD), and infantile-onset epileptic encephalopathy.
Troyer syndrome
MedGen UID:
97950
Concept ID:
C0393559
Disease or Syndrome
Troyer syndrome is characterized by progressive spastic paraparesis, dysarthria, pseudobulbar palsy, distal amyotrophy, short stature, and subtle skeletal abnormalities. Most affected children exhibit delays in walking and speech and difficulty in managing oral secretions, followed by increased lower-limb spasticity and slow deterioration in both gait and speech. Mild cerebellar signs are common. The most severely affected individuals have choreoathetosis. Emotional lability / difficulty in controlling emotions and affective disorders, such as inappropriate euphoria and/or crying, are frequently described. Life expectancy is normal.
Chorea-acanthocytosis
MedGen UID:
98277
Concept ID:
C0393576
Disease or Syndrome
Chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) is characterized by a progressive movement disorder, cognitive and behavior changes, a myopathy that can be subclinical, and chronic hyperCKemia in serum. Although the disorder is named for acanthocytosis of the red blood cells, this feature is variable. The movement disorder is mostly limb chorea, but some individuals present with parkinsonism. Dystonia is common and affects the oral region and especially the tongue, causing dysarthria and serious dysphagia with resultant weight loss. Habitual tongue and lip biting are characteristic, as well as tongue protrusion dystonia. Progressive cognitive and behavioral changes resemble those in a frontal lobe syndrome. Seizures are observed in almost half of affected individuals and can be the initial manifestation. Myopathy results in progressive distal muscle wasting and weakness. Mean age of onset in ChAc is about 30 years, although ChAc can develop as early as the first decade or as late as the seventh decade. It runs a chronic progressive course and may lead to major disability within a few years. Life expectancy is reduced, with age of death ranging from 28 to 61 years.
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
140747
Concept ID:
C0393807
Disease or Syndrome
MFN2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (MFN2-HMSN) is a classic axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, inherited in either an autosomal dominant (AD) manner (~90%) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner (~10%). MFN2-HMSN is characterized by more severe involvement of the lower extremities than the upper extremities, distal upper-extremity involvement as the neuropathy progresses, more prominent motor deficits than sensory deficits, and normal (>42 m/s) or only slightly decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCVs). Postural tremor is common. Median onset is age 12 years in the AD form and age eight years in the AR form. The prevalence of optic atrophy is approximately 7% in the AD form and approximately 20% in the AR form.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease X-linked dominant 1
MedGen UID:
98290
Concept ID:
C0393808
Disease or Syndrome
GJB1 disorders are typically characterized by peripheral motor and sensory neuropathy with or without fixed CNS abnormalities and/or acute, self-limited episodes of transient neurologic dysfunction (especially weakness and dysarthria). Peripheral neuropathy typically manifests in affected males between ages five and 25 years. Although both men and women are affected, manifestations tend to be less severe in women, some of whom may remain asymptomatic. Less commonly, initial manifestations in some affected individuals are stroke-like episodes (acute fulminant episodes of reversible CNS dysfunction).
Myopathy, centronuclear, 2
MedGen UID:
98049
Concept ID:
C0410204
Disease or Syndrome
Any centronuclear myopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the BIN1 gene.
Mesomelic dwarfism, Nievergelt type
MedGen UID:
98478
Concept ID:
C0432231
Disease or Syndrome
A rare primary bone dysplasia characterized by severe mesomelic shortness particularly of the lower limbs with distinctive triangular or rhomboid-shaped tibiae and fibulae, accompanied by bony protuberances and skin dimples. Additional manifestations include radioulnar synostosis, dislocation of the radial head, abnormalities of the hands (such as oligosyndactyly or fusiform-shaped fingers) and feet (pes equinovarus, synostoses of tarsals/metatarsals and phalanges), and dysmorphic facial features.
Deletion of long arm of chromosome 18
MedGen UID:
96605
Concept ID:
C0432443
Disease or Syndrome
Monosomy 18q is a partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 18 characterized by highly variable phenotype, most commonly including hypotonia, developmental delay, short stature, growth hormone deficiency, hearing loss and external ear anomalies, intellectual disability, palatal defects, dysmorphic facial features, skeletal anomalies (foot deformities, tapering fingers, scoliosis) and mood disorders.
MASA syndrome
MedGen UID:
162894
Concept ID:
C0795953
Disease or Syndrome
L1 syndrome involves a phenotypic spectrum ranging from severe to mild and includes three clinical phenotypes: X-linked hydrocephalus with stenosis of the aqueduct of Sylvius (HSAS). MASA (mental retardation [intellectual disability], aphasia [delayed speech], spastic paraplegia [shuffling gait], adducted thumbs) syndrome including X-linked complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia type 1. X-linked complicated corpus callosum agenesis. Males with HSAS are born with severe hydrocephalus, adducted thumbs, and spasticity; intellectual disability is severe. In less severely affected males, hydrocephalus may be subclinically present and documented only because of developmental delay; intellectual disability ranges from mild (IQ: 50-70) to moderate (IQ: 30-50). It is important to note that all phenotypes can be observed in affected individuals within the same family.
Peters plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
163204
Concept ID:
C0796012
Disease or Syndrome
Peters plus syndrome is characterized by anterior chamber eye anomalies, short limbs with broad distal extremities, characteristic facial features, cleft lip/palate, and variable developmental delay / intellectual disability. The most common anterior chamber defect is Peters' anomaly, consisting of central corneal clouding, thinning of the posterior cornea, and iridocorneal adhesions. Cataracts and glaucoma are common. Developmental delay is observed in about 80% of children; intellectual disability can range from mild to severe.
Primrose syndrome
MedGen UID:
162911
Concept ID:
C0796121
Disease or Syndrome
Primrose syndrome is characterized by macrocephaly, hypotonia, developmental delay, intellectual disability with expressive speech delay, behavioral issues, a recognizable facial phenotype, radiographic features, and altered glucose metabolism. Additional features seen in adults: sparse body hair, distal muscle wasting, and contractures. Characteristic craniofacial features include brachycephaly, high anterior hairline, deeply set eyes, ptosis, downslanted palpebral fissures, high palate with torus palatinus, broad jaw, and large ears with small or absent lobes. Radiographic features include calcification of the external ear cartilage, multiple Wormian bones, platybasia, bathrocephaly, slender bones with exaggerated metaphyseal flaring, mild epiphyseal dysplasia, and spondylar dysplasia. Additional features include hearing impairment, ocular anomalies, cryptorchidism, and nonspecific findings on brain MRI.
Renpenning syndrome
MedGen UID:
208670
Concept ID:
C0796135
Disease or Syndrome
Renpenning syndrome is an X-linked mental retardation syndrome with clinically recognizable features. Affected individuals have microcephaly, short stature, small testes, and dysmorphic facies, including tall narrow face, upslanting palpebral fissures, abnormal nasal configuration, cupped ears, and short philtrum. The nose may appear long or bulbous, with overhanging columella. Less consistent manifestations include ocular colobomas, cardiac malformations, cleft palate, and anal anomalies. Stevenson et al. (2005) proposed that the various X-linked mental retardation syndromes due to PQBP1 mutations be combined under the name of Renpenning syndrome.
X-linked intellectual disability-psychosis-macroorchidism syndrome
MedGen UID:
163232
Concept ID:
C0796222
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of MECP2-related phenotypes in females ranges from classic Rett syndrome to variant Rett syndrome with a broader clinical phenotype (either milder or more severe than classic Rett syndrome) to mild learning disabilities; the spectrum in males ranges from severe neonatal encephalopathy to pyramidal signs, parkinsonism, and macroorchidism (PPM-X) syndrome to severe syndromic/nonsyndromic intellectual disability. Females: Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Males: Severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy, the most common phenotype in affected males, is characterized by a relentless clinical course that follows a metabolic-degenerative type of pattern, abnormal tone, involuntary movements, severe seizures, and breathing abnormalities. Death often occurs before age two years.
Danon disease
MedGen UID:
209235
Concept ID:
C0878677
Disease or Syndrome
Danon disease is a multisystem condition with predominant involvement of the heart, skeletal muscles, and retina, with overlying cognitive dysfunction. Males are typically more severely affected than females. Males usually present with childhood onset concentric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that is progressive and often requires heart transplantation. Rarely, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can evolve to resemble dilated cardiomyopathy. Most affected males also have cardiac conduction abnormalities. Skeletal muscle weakness may lead to delayed acquisition of motor milestones. Learning disability and intellectual disability, most often in the mild range, are common. Additionally, affected males can develop retinopathy with subsequent visual impairment. The clinical features in females are broader and more variable. Females are more likely to have dilated cardiomyopathy, with a smaller proportion requiring heart transplantation compared to affected males. Cardiac conduction abnormalities, skeletal muscle weakness, mild cognitive impairment, and pigmentary retinopathy are variably seen in affected females.
Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 1 with or without anosmia
MedGen UID:
295872
Concept ID:
C1563719
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D
MedGen UID:
316946
Concept ID:
C1832274
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of GARS1-associated axonal neuropathy ranges from GARS1 infantile-onset SMA (GARS1-iSMA) to GARS1 adolescent- or early adult-onset hereditary motor/sensory neuropathy (GARS1-HMSN). GARS1-iSMA. Age of onset ranges from the neonatal period to the toddler years. Initial manifestations are typically respiratory distress, poor feeding, and muscle weakness (distal greater than proximal). Weakness is slowly progressive, ultimately requiring mechanical ventilation and feeding via gastrostomy tube. GARS1-HMSN. Age of onset is most commonly during the second decade (range eight to 36 years). Initial manifestations are typically muscle weakness in the hands sometimes with sensory deficits. Lower limb involvement (seen in ~50% of individuals) ranges from weakness and atrophy of the extensor digitorum brevis and weakness of toe dorsiflexors to classic peroneal muscular atrophy with foot drop and a high steppage gait.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D
MedGen UID:
371304
Concept ID:
C1832334
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D (CMT4D) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the peripheral nervous system characterized by early-onset distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, and sensory loss affecting all modalities. Affected individuals develop deafness by the third decade of life (summary by Okamoto et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Cerebellar ataxia-areflexia-pes cavus-optic atrophy-sensorineural hearing loss syndrome
MedGen UID:
318633
Concept ID:
C1832466
Disease or Syndrome
ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders represent a clinical continuum in which at least three distinct phenotypes have been delineated: rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP); alternating hemiplegia of childhood (ACH); and cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS). However, some affected individuals have intermediate phenotypes or only a few features that do not fit well into one of these major phenotypes. RDP has been characterized by: abrupt onset of dystonia over days to weeks with parkinsonism (primarily bradykinesia and postural instability); common bulbar involvement; and absence or minimal response to an adequate trial of L-dopa therapy, with few exceptions. Often fever, physiologic stress, or alcoholic binges trigger the onset of symptoms. After their initial appearance, symptoms often stabilize with little improvement; occasionally second episodes occur with abrupt worsening of symptoms. Rarely, affected individuals have reported a more gradual onset of symptoms over weeks to months. Anxiety, depression, and seizures have been reported. Age of onset ranges from four to 55 years, although a childhood variation of RDP with onset between ages nine and 14 months has been reported. AHC is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome most frequently manifesting in infancy or early childhood with paroxysmal episodic neurologic dysfunction including alternating hemiparesis or dystonia, quadriparesis, seizure-like episodes, and oculomotor abnormalities. Episodes can last for minutes, hours, days, or even weeks. Remission of symptoms occurs with sleep and immediately after awakening. Over time, persistent neurologic deficits including oculomotor apraxia, ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, parkinsonism, and cognitive and behavioral dysfunction develop in the majority of those affected; more than 50% develop epilepsy in addition to their episodic movement disorder phenotype. CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome is characterized by episodes of ataxic encephalopathy and/or weakness during and after a febrile illness. Onset is between ages six months and four years. Some acute symptoms resolve; progression of sensory losses and severity vary.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B
MedGen UID:
371512
Concept ID:
C1833219
Disease or Syndrome
A severe form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. Onset in the second or third decade has manifestations of ulceration and infection of the feet. Symmetric and distal weakness develops mostly in the legs together with a severe symmetric distal sensory loss. Tendon reflexes are only reduced at ankles and foot deformities including pes cavus or planus and hammer toes, appear in childhood.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 7A
MedGen UID:
322474
Concept ID:
C1834703
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-7 (HMND7) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset in the second decade of progressive distal muscle wasting and weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs and resulting in walking difficulties and hand grip. There is significant muscle atrophy of the hands and lower limbs. The disorder is associated with vocal cord paresis due to involvement of the tenth cranial nerve (summary by Barwick et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant distal HMN, see HMND1 (182960).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 1
MedGen UID:
371919
Concept ID:
C1834846
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Leri pleonosteosis
MedGen UID:
331978
Concept ID:
C1835450
Disease or Syndrome
Leri pleonosteosis is an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder characterized by flexion contractures of the interphalangeal joints, limited movement of multiple joints, and short, broad metacarpals, metatarsals, and phalanges. Additional features may include chronic joint pain, short stature, bony overgrowths, spinal cord compression, scleroderma-like skin changes, and blepharophimosis. The clinical features overlap with several other musculoskeletal conditions, including Myhre syndrome (MYHRS; 139210) and geleophysic dysplasia (GPHYSD1; 231050) (summary by Banka et al., 2015).
SPOAN syndrome
MedGen UID:
324411
Concept ID:
C1836010
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy, and neuropathy (SPOAN) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by early-onset progressive spastic paraplegia resulting in loss of independent ambulation in the teenage years. Additional features include optic atrophy, later onset of sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, and progressive joint contractures; cognition remains intact (summary by Melo et al., 2015).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 28
MedGen UID:
332174
Concept ID:
C1836295
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-29 (SPG28) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by early-onset, slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting in walking difficulties. Some patients also have distal sensory impairment (summary by Tesson et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see 270800.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4H
MedGen UID:
324487
Concept ID:
C1836336
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 4H (CMT4H) is a demyelinating CMT peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy. It has been described in 10 individuals from two large consanguineous families from Lebanon and Algeria. Onset occurs within the first two years of life with slowly progressive muscle weakness in the distal extremities. Other common features include delayed walking, an abnormal gait, scoliosis and pes equines with toe retraction. CMT4H is caused by mutations in the FGD4 gene (12p11.1). Transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 27
MedGen UID:
373075
Concept ID:
C1836383
Disease or Syndrome
Disease with characteristics of early-onset tremor, dyskinesia and slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia. Fewer than 30 cases have been reported to date. This disease is caused by a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor 14 FGF14 gene (13q34). Prognosis is relatively good. Life-threatening status epilepticus and intractable seizure or severe dysphagia is rare.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 26
MedGen UID:
373138
Concept ID:
C1836632
Disease or Syndrome
SPG26 is an autosomal recessive form of complicated spastic paraplegia characterized by onset in the first 2 decades of life of gait abnormalities due to lower limb spasticity and muscle weakness. Some patients have upper limb involvement. Additional features include intellectual disability, peripheral neuropathy, dysarthria, cerebellar signs, extrapyramidal signs, and cortical atrophy. The disorder is slowly progressive (summary by Boukhris et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive SPG, see SPG5A (270800).
PCWH syndrome
MedGen UID:
373160
Concept ID:
C1836727
Disease or Syndrome
PCWH syndrome is a complex neurocristopathy that includes features of 4 distinct syndromes: peripheral demyelinating neuropathy (see 118200), central dysmyelination, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease (see 142623) (Inoue et al., 2004). Inoue et al. (2004) proposed the acronym PCWH for this disorder.
Macular degeneration, age-related, 3
MedGen UID:
373276
Concept ID:
C1837187
Disease or Syndrome
Age-related macular degeneration-3 (ARMD3) is characterized by numerous small round yellow lesions visible at the temporal edge of the macula. Larger, less distinct yellow areas near the center of the macula are also observed, which represent areas of pigment epithelial detachment (Stone et al., 2004). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of age-related macular degeneration, see 603075.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 25
MedGen UID:
373347
Concept ID:
C1837518
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-25 (SCA25) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of lower limb ataxia resulting in gait difficulties in the first few decades of life, although later onset has been reported. Affected individuals often have upper limb involvement, dysarthria, scoliosis, abnormal eye movements, and sensory neuropathy with decreased reflexes. Some patients have sensorineural hearing loss. Brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy. There is incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity, even within families (Barbier et al., 2022). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2L
MedGen UID:
324826
Concept ID:
C1837552
Disease or Syndrome
A form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. In the single family reported to date, CMT2L onset is between 15 and 33 years. Patients present with a symmetric distal weakness of legs and occasionally of the hands, absent or reduced tendon reflexes, distal legs sensory loss and frequently a pes cavus. Progression is slow.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 6
MedGen UID:
324965
Concept ID:
C1838192
Disease or Syndrome
A form of hereditary spastic paraplegia which usually presents in late adolescence or early adulthood as a pure phenotype of lower limb spasticity with hyperreflexia and extensor plantar responses, as well as mild bladder disturbances and pes cavus. Rarely, it can present as a complex phenotype with additional manifestations including epilepsy, variable peripheral neuropathy and/or memory impairment. Caused by mutations in the NIPA1 gene (15q11.2) encoding the magnesium transporter NIPA1.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 2
MedGen UID:
374177
Concept ID:
C1839264
Disease or Syndrome
PLP1 disorders of central nervous system myelin formation include a range of phenotypes from Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) to spastic paraplegia 2 (SPG2). PMD typically manifests in infancy or early childhood with nystagmus, hypotonia, and cognitive impairment; the findings progress to severe spasticity and ataxia. Life span is shortened. SPG2 manifests as spastic paraparesis with or without CNS involvement and usually normal life span. Intrafamilial variation of phenotypes can be observed, but the signs are usually fairly consistent within families. Heterozygous females may manifest mild-to-moderate signs of the disease.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease X-linked recessive 5
MedGen UID:
374254
Concept ID:
C1839566
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 5 (CMTX5), part of the spectrum of PRPS1-related disorders, is characterized by peripheral neuropathy, early-onset (prelingual) bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss, and optic neuropathy. The onset of peripheral neuropathy is between ages five and 12 years. The lower extremities are affected earlier and more severely than upper extremities. Initial manifestations often include foot drop or gait disturbance. Onset of visual impairment is between ages seven and 20 years. Intellect and life span are normal. Carrier females do not have findings of CMTX5.
Wilson-Turner syndrome
MedGen UID:
333393
Concept ID:
C1839736
Disease or Syndrome
Wilson-Turner syndrome (WTS) is an X-linked recessive neurologic disorder characterized by intellectual disability, dysmorphic facial features, hypogonadism, short stature, and truncal obesity. Females are unaffected (Wilson et al., 1991).
Kallmann syndrome with spastic paraplegia
MedGen UID:
333437
Concept ID:
C1839911
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease recessive intermediate A
MedGen UID:
334012
Concept ID:
C1842197
Disease or Syndrome
GDAP1-related hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (GDAP1-HMSN) is a peripheral neuropathy (also known as a subtype of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) that typically affects the lower extremities earlier and more severely than the upper extremities. As the neuropathy progresses, the distal upper extremities also become severely affected. Proximal muscles can also become weak. Age at onset ranges from infancy to early childhood. In most cases, disease progression causes disabilities within the first or second decade of life. At the end of the second decade, most individuals are wheelchair bound. Disease progression varies considerably even within the same family. The neuropathy can be either of the demyelinating type with reduced nerve conduction velocities or the axonal type with normal nerve conduction velocities. Vocal cord paresis is common. Intelligence is normal. Life expectancy is usually normal, but on occasion may be reduced because of secondary complications.
Chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
334629
Concept ID:
C1842870
Disease or Syndrome
The constitutional deletion of chromosome 1p36 results in a syndrome with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation (Shapira et al., 1997). Monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion syndrome in humans, occurring in 1 in 5,000 births (Shaffer and Lupski, 2000; Heilstedt et al., 2003). See also neurodevelopmental disorder with or without anomalies of the brain, eye, or heart (NEDBEH; 616975), which shows overlapping features and is caused by heterozygous mutation in the RERE gene (605226) on proximal chromosome 1p36. See also Radio-Tartaglia syndrome (RATARS; 619312), caused by mutation in the SPEN gene (613484) on chromosome 1p36, which shows overlapping features.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2J
MedGen UID:
375107
Concept ID:
C1843153
Disease or Syndrome
For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1F
MedGen UID:
334337
Concept ID:
C1843164
Disease or Syndrome
A form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, with a variable clinical presentation that can range from severe impairment with onset in childhood to mild impairment appearing during adulthood. The disease has characteristics of progressive peripheral motor and sensory neuropathy with distal paresis in the lower limbs that varies from mild weakness to complete paralysis of the distal muscle groups, absent tendon reflexes and reduced nerve conduction. Caused by mutations in the NEFL gene (8p21.2).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2H
MedGen UID:
334344
Concept ID:
C1843173
Disease or Syndrome
An axonal peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy associated with pyramidal involvement. So far, it has been described in 13 members of a large Tunisian family. Onset occurred during the first decade of life with progressive distal atrophy involving both the upper and lower limbs, associated with a mild pyramidal syndrome (brisk patellar and upper limb reflexes, absent ankle reflexes and unattainable plantar reflexes). Transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and the disease-causing locus has been mapped to 8q13-21.1.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, with vocal cord paresis, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
375113
Concept ID:
C1843183
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2E
MedGen UID:
375127
Concept ID:
C1843225
Disease or Syndrome
A form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. Onset is in the first to sixth decade with a gait anomaly and a leg weakness that reaches the arms secondarily. Tendon reflexes are reduced or absent and after years all patients have a pes cavus. Other signs may be present including hearing loss and postural tremor.
Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis
MedGen UID:
375302
Concept ID:
C1843851
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 18
MedGen UID:
336066
Concept ID:
C1843884
Disease or Syndrome
Disease with characteristics of sensory neuropathy and cerebellar ataxia. Prevalence is unknown. Only 26 cases in a 5-generation American family of Irish ancestry have been reported to date. Onset is in the second and third decades of life with symptomatic onset ranging from 13 to 27 years. Patients initially present with axonal sensory neuropathy, while cerebellar ataxia and motor neuron dysfunction develop later. Linked to chromosome 7q22-q23 but the responsible gene mutation has not yet been identified.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease X-linked recessive 3
MedGen UID:
375530
Concept ID:
C1844865
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy with an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern and the childhood to adolescent-onset of progressive, distal muscle weakness and atrophy (beginning in the lower extremities and then affecting the upper extremities), as well as distal, pan sensory loss in the upper and lower extremities, pes cavus, and absent or reduced distal tendon reflexes. Pain and paraesthesia are frequently the initial sensory symptoms. Spastic paraparesis (manifested by clasp-knife sign, hyperactive deep-tendon reflexes, and Babinski sign) has also been reported.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease X-linked recessive 2
MedGen UID:
336803
Concept ID:
C1844873
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy with an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern and the infantile to childhood-onset of progressive, distal muscle weakness and atrophy (more prominent in the lower extremities than in the upper extremities), pes cavus, and absent tendon reflexes. Sensory impairment and intellectual disability has been reported in some individuals.
X-linked distal spinal muscular atrophy type 3
MedGen UID:
335168
Concept ID:
C1845359
Disease or Syndrome
A rare distal hereditary motor neuropathy with characteristics of slowly progressive atrophy and weakness of distal muscles of hands and feet with normal deep tendon reflexes or absent ankle reflexes and minimal or no sensory loss, sometimes mild proximal weakness in the legs and feet and hand deformities in males.
X-linked intellectual disability Cabezas type
MedGen UID:
337334
Concept ID:
C1845861
Disease or Syndrome
The Cabezas type of X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder is characterized primarily by short stature, hypogonadism, and abnormal gait, with other more variable features such as speech delay, prominent lower lip, and tremor (Cabezas et al., 2000).
Creatine transporter deficiency
MedGen UID:
337451
Concept ID:
C1845862
Disease or Syndrome
The creatine deficiency disorders (CDDs), inborn errors of creatine metabolism and transport, comprise three disorders: the creatine biosynthesis disorders guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency and L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency; and creatine transporter (CRTR) deficiency. Developmental delay and cognitive dysfunction or intellectual disability and speech-language disorder are common to all three CDDs. Onset of clinical manifestations of GAMT deficiency (reported in ~130 individuals) is between ages three months and two years; in addition to developmental delays, the majority of individuals have epilepsy and develop a behavior disorder (e.g., hyperactivity, autism, or self-injurious behavior), and about 30% have movement disorder. AGAT deficiency has been reported in 16 individuals; none have had epilepsy or movement disorders. Clinical findings of CRTR deficiency in affected males (reported in ~130 individuals) in addition to developmental delays include epilepsy (variable seizure types and may be intractable) and behavior disorders (e.g., attention deficit and/or hyperactivity, autistic features, impulsivity, social anxiety), hypotonia, and (less commonly) a movement disorder. Poor weight gain with constipation and prolonged QTc on EKG have been reported. While mild-to-moderate intellectual disability is commonly observed up to age four years, the majority of adult males with CRTR deficiency have been reported to have severe intellectual disability. Females heterozygous for CRTR deficiency are typically either asymptomatic or have mild intellectual disability, although a more severe phenotype resembling the male phenotype has been reported.
Uruguay Faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
335320
Concept ID:
C1846010
Disease or Syndrome
Uruguay faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome (FCMSU) is an X-linked disorder in which affected males have a distinctive facial appearance, muscular hypertrophy, and cardiac ventricular hypertrophy leading to premature death. Additional features include large, broad, and deformed hands and feet, congenital hip dislocation, and scoliosis (summary by Xue et al., 2016).
Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia-saccadic intrusion syndrome
MedGen UID:
335442
Concept ID:
C1846492
Disease or Syndrome
VPS13D movement disorder is a hyperkinetic movement disorder (dystonia, chorea, and/or ataxia) of variable age of onset that can be associated with developmental delay. Onset ranges from birth to adulthood. Individuals can present in childhood with motor delays and gait instability. Cognitive impairment ranging from mild intellectual disability to developmental delay has been reported, and several individuals have normal cognitive function. Individuals have also presented as young adults with gait difficulties caused by spastic ataxia or ataxia. In addition to gait ataxia, affected individuals had limb ataxia, dysarthria, and eye movement abnormalities (macro-saccadic oscillations, nystagmus, and saccadic pursuit). Additional features reported in some individuals include peripheral neuropathy and/or seizures. The disorder progresses to spastic ataxia or generalized dystonia, which can lead to loss of independent ambulation.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 7
MedGen UID:
339552
Concept ID:
C1846564
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 7 (SPG7) is characterized by insidiously progressive bilateral leg weakness and spasticity. Most affected individuals have decreased vibration sense and cerebellar signs. Onset is mostly in adulthood, although symptoms may start as early as age 11 years and as late as age 72 years. Additional features including ataxia (gait and limbs), spastic dysarthria, dysphagia, pale optic disks, ataxia, nystagmus, strabismus, ptosis, hearing loss, motor and sensory neuropathy, amyotrophy, scoliosis, pes cavus, and urinary sphincter disturbances may be observed.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2F
MedGen UID:
335784
Concept ID:
C1847823
Disease or Syndrome
A form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy with symmetric weakness primarily occurring in the lower limbs and reaching the arms only after 5 to 10 years, occasional and predominantly distal sensory loss and reduced tendon reflexes. Presents with gait anomaly between the first and sixth decade and early onset is generally associated to a more severe phenotype that may include foot drop.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease dominant intermediate B
MedGen UID:
338346
Concept ID:
C1847902
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of the peripheral nervous system, characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy, initially of the peroneal muscles and later of the distal muscles of the arms. Classification CMT neuropathy is subdivided into CMT1 (see 118200) and CMT2 (see 118210) types on the basis of electrophysiologic and neuropathologic criteria. CMT1, or hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I (HMSN I), is a demyelinating neuropathy, whereas CMT2, or HMSN II, is an axonal neuropathy. Most patients with CMT are classified as having CMT1 or CMT2 by use of a cut-off value of 38 m/s for the motor median nerve conduction velocity (NCV). However, in some families with CMT, patients have motor median NCVs ranging from 25 to 45 m/s. Families of this type were reported by Salisachs (1974) and Davis et al. (1978). Davis et al. (1978) proposed that this form be designated 'intermediate' CMT. Claeys et al. (2009) stated that some CMT families may have an even broader range of NCV than 25 to 45 m/s, with the lowest levels around 25 and the highest levels within the normal range (50+ m/s). They also suggested that the term 'intermediate' should not be used to describe a single NCV value, but rather the CMT subtype at the level of the family (e.g., in families with a range or combinations of NCV values). Berciano et al. (2017) provided a detailed review of the different forms of intermediate CMT, noting that diagnoses may be controversial because of variable classification issues. The authors presented an algorithm for the interpretation of electrophysiologic studies in CMT, and suggested that nerve conduction studies should be conducted on the upper arm (axilla to elbow). They noted that distal axonal degeneration can result in secondary myelination defects, which may cause significantly decreased motor NCV and CMAP values that may be misinterpreted. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Dominant Intermediate CMT In addition to CMTDIB, which is caused by mutation in the DNM2 gene, other forms of dominant intermediate CMT include CMTDIA (620378), mapped to chromosome 10q24-q25; CMTDIC (608323), caused by mutation in the YARS gene (603623) on chromosome 1p35; CMTDID (607791), caused by mutation in the MPZ gene (159440) on chromosome 1q22; CMTDIE with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (CMTDIE; 614455), caused by mutation in the INF2 gene (610982) on chromosome 14q32; CMTDIF (615185), caused by mutation in the GNB4 gene (610863) on chromosome 3q26; and CMTDIG (617882), caused by mutation in the NEFL gene (162280) on chromosome 8p21.
Spinal muscular atrophy, Ryukyuan type
MedGen UID:
376517
Concept ID:
C1849102
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 5A
MedGen UID:
376521
Concept ID:
C1849115
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-5A (SPG5A) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder with a wide phenotypic spectrum. Some patients have pure spastic paraplegia affecting only gait, whereas others may have a complicated phenotype with additional manifestations, including optic atrophy or cerebellar ataxia (summary by Arnoldi et al., 2012). The hereditary spastic paraplegias (SPG) are a group of clinically and genetically diverse disorders characterized by progressive, usually severe, lower extremity spasticity; see reviews of Fink et al. (1996) and Fink (1997). Inheritance is most often autosomal dominant (see 182600), but X-linked (see 303350) and autosomal recessive forms also occur. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Recessive Spastic Paraplegia Autosomal recessive forms of SPG include SPG7 (607259), caused by mutation in the paraplegin gene (602783) on chromosome 16q24; SPG9B (616586), caused by mutation in the ALDH18A1 gene (138250) on 10q24; SPG11 (604360), caused by mutation in the spatacsin gene (610844) on 15q21; SPG15 (270700), caused by mutation in the ZFYVE26 gene (612012) on 14q24; SPG18 (611225), caused by mutation in the ERLIN2 gene (611605) on 8p11; SPG20 (275900), caused by mutation in the spartin gene (607111) on 13q12; SPG21 (248900), caused by mutation in the maspardin gene (608181) on 15q21; SPG26 (609195), caused by mutation in the B4GALNT1 gene (601873) on 12q13; SPG28 (609340), caused by mutation in the DDHD1 gene (614603) on 14q22; SPG30 (610357), caused by mutation in the KIF1A gene (601255) on 2q37; SPG35 (612319), caused by mutation in the FA2H gene (611026) on 16q23; SPG39 (612020), caused by mutation in the PNPLA6 gene (603197) on 19p13; SPG43 (615043), caused by mutation in the C19ORF12 gene (614297) on 19q12; SPG44 (613206), caused by mutation in the GJC2 gene (608803) on 1q42; SPG45 (613162), caused by mutation in the NT5C2 gene (600417) on 10q24; SPG46 (614409), caused by mutation in the GBA2 gene (609471) on 9p13; SPG48 (613647), caused by mutation in the KIAA0415 gene (613653) on 7p22; SPG50 (612936), caused by mutation in the AP4M1 gene (602296) on 7q22; SPG51 (613744), caused by mutation in the AP4E1 gene (607244) on 15q21; SPG52 (614067), caused by mutation in the AP4S1 gene (607243) on 14q12; SPG53 (614898), caused by mutation in the VPS37A gene (609927) on 8p22; SPG54 (615033), caused by mutation in the DDHD2 gene (615003) on 8p11; SPG55 (615035), caused by mutation in the MTRFR gene on 12q24; SPG56 (615030), caused by mutation in the CYP2U1 gene (610670) on 4q25; SPG57 (615658), caused by mutation in the TFG gene (602498) on 3q12; SPG61 (615685), caused by mutation in the ARL6IP1 gene (607669) on 1p12; SPG62 (615681), caused by mutation in the ERLIN1 gene on 10q24; SPG63 (615686), caused by mutation in the AMPD2 gene (102771) on 1p13; SPG64 (615683), caused by mutation in the ENTPD1 gene (601752) on 10q24; SPG72 (615625), caused by mutation in the REEP2 gene (609347) on 5q31; SPG74 (616451), caused by mutation in the IBA57 gene (615316) on 1q42; SPG75 (616680), caused by mutation in the MAG gene (159460) on 19q13; SPG76 (616907), caused by mutation in the CAPN1 gene (114220) on 11q13; SPG77 (617046), caused by mutation in the FARS2 gene (611592) on 6p25; SPG78 (617225), caused by mutation in the ATP13A2 gene (610513) on 1p36; SPG79 (615491), caused by mutation in the UCHL1 gene (191342) on 4p13; SPG81 (618768), caused by mutation in the SELENOI gene (607915) on 2p23; SPG82 (618770), caused by mutation in the PCYT2 gene (602679) on 17q25; SPG83 (619027), caused by mutation in the HPDL gene (618994) on 1p34; SPG84 (619621), caused by mutation in the PI4KA gene (600286) on 22q11; SPG85 (619686), caused by mutation in the RNF170 gene (614649) on 8p11; SPG86 (619735), caused by mutation in the ABHD16A gene (142620) on 6p21; SPG87 (619966), caused by mutation in the TMEM63C gene (619953) on 14q24; SPG89 (620379), caused by mutation in the AMFR gene (603243) on 16q13; and SPG90B (620417), caused by mutation in the SPTSSA gene (613540) on 14q13. Additional autosomal recessive forms of SPG have been mapped to chromosomes 3q (SPG14; 605229), 13q14 (SPG24; 607584), 6q (SPG25; 608220), and 10q22 (SPG27; 609041). A disorder that was formerly designated SPG49 has been reclassified as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy-9 with developmental delay (HSAN9; 615031).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 15
MedGen UID:
341387
Concept ID:
C1849128
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 15 (SPG15), typically an early-onset complex hereditary spastic paraplegia, is characterized by progressive spasticity that begins in the lower extremities and is associated with several manifestations resulting from central and peripheral nervous system dysfunction. While onset of spasticity is typically in mid- to late childhood or adolescence (i.e., between ages 5 and 18 years), other manifestations, such as developmental delay or learning disability, may be present earlier, often preceding motor involvement. Individuals with adult onset have also been reported.
Charlevoix-Saguenay spastic ataxia
MedGen UID:
338620
Concept ID:
C1849140
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is clinically characterized by a progressive cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, and spasticity. Disease onset of classic ARSACS is often in early childhood, leading to delayed walking because of gait unsteadiness in very young toddlers, while an increasing number of individuals with disease onset in teenage or early-adult years are now being described. Typically the ataxia is followed by lower-limb spasticity and later by peripheral neuropathy – although pronounced peripheral neuropathy has been observed as a first sign of ARSACS. Oculomotor disturbances, dysarthria, and upper-limb ataxia develop with slower progression than the other findings. Brain imaging demonstrates atrophy of the superior vermis and the cerebellar hemisphere with additional findings on MRI, such as linear hypointensities in the pons and hyperintense rims around the thalami. Many affected individuals (though not all) have yellow streaks of hypermyelinated fibers radiating from the edges of the optic disc noted on ophthalmologic exam, and thickened retinal fibers can be demonstrated by optical coherence tomography. Mild intellectual disability, hearing loss, and urinary urgency and incontinence have been reported in some individuals.
Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis arthropathy spectrum
MedGen UID:
342428
Concept ID:
C1850155
Disease or Syndrome
Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis and arthropathy (MONA) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by progressive osteolysis (particularly of the carpal and tarsal bones), osteoporosis, subcutaneous nodules on the palms and soles, and progressive arthropathy (joint contractures, pain, swelling, and stiffness). Other manifestations include coarse facies, pigmented skin lesions, cardiac defects, and corneal opacities. Onset is usually between ages six months and six years (range: birth to 11 years).
Giant axonal neuropathy 1
MedGen UID:
376775
Concept ID:
C1850386
Disease or Syndrome
GAN-related neurodegeneration comprises a phenotypic continuum ranging from severe (sometimes called classic giant axonal neuropathy) to milder pure early-onset peripheral motor and sensory neuropathies. The classic giant axonal neuropathy phenotype typically manifests as an infantile-onset neurodegenerative disorder, starting as a severe peripheral motor and sensory neuropathy and evolving into central nervous system impairment (intellectual disability, seizures, cerebellar signs, and pyramidal tract signs). Most affected individuals become wheelchair dependent in the second decade of life and eventually bedridden with severe polyneuropathy, ataxia, and dementia. Death usually occurs in the third decade. At the milder end of the spectrum are predominantly motor and sensory neuropathies (with little to no CNS involvement) that overlap with the axonal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies.
Dystonia 5
MedGen UID:
342121
Concept ID:
C1851920
Disease or Syndrome
GTP cyclohydrolase 1-deficient dopa-responsive dystonia (GTPCH1-deficient DRD) is characterized by childhood-onset dystonia and a dramatic and sustained response to low doses of oral administration of levodopa. This disorder typically presents with gait disturbance caused by foot dystonia, later development of parkinsonism, and diurnal fluctuation of symptoms (aggravation of symptoms toward the evening and alleviation of symptoms in the morning after sleep). Initial symptoms are often gait difficulties attributable to flexion-inversion (equinovarus posture) of the foot. Occasionally, initial symptoms are arm dystonia, postural tremor of the hand, or slowness of movements. Brisk deep-tendon reflexes in the legs, ankle clonus, and/or the striatal toe (dystonic extension of the big toe) are present in many affected individuals. In general, gradual progression to generalized dystonia is observed. Intellectual, cerebellar, sensory, and autonomic disturbances generally do not occur.
Autosomal recessive ataxia, Beauce type
MedGen UID:
343973
Concept ID:
C1853116
Disease or Syndrome
SYNE1 deficiency comprises a phenotypic spectrum that ranges from autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia at the mild end to arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) at the severe end. SYNE1-deficient cerebellar ataxia, the most commonly recognized manifestation of SYNE1 deficiency to date, is a slowly progressive disorder typically beginning in adulthood (age range 6-45 years). While some individuals have a pure cerebellar syndrome (i.e., cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, abnormalities in ocular saccades and smooth pursuit), many also have upper motor neuron dysfunction (spasticity, hyperreflexia, Babinski sign) and/or lower motor neuron dysfunction (amyotrophy, reduced reflexes, fasciculations). Most individuals develop features of the cerebellar cognitive and affective syndrome (i.e., significant deficits in attention, executive functioning, verbal working memory, and visuospatial/visuoconstructional skills). The two less common phenotypes are SYNE1-deficient childhood-onset multisystem disease (ataxia, upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction, muscle weakness and wasting, intellectual disability) and SYNE1-deficient arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (decreased fetal movements and severe neonatal hypotonia associated with multiple congenital joint contractures including clubfoot).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 31
MedGen UID:
377858
Concept ID:
C1853247
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-31 (SPG31) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized primarily by spasticity of the lower limbs, resulting in gait abnormalities and muscle weakness. There is a bimodal age at onset with a peak in the second and fourth decades of life. Most affected individuals have a 'pure' form of the disorder with gait difficulties and hyperreflexia of the lower limbs. However, there is phenotypic heterogeneity, and some patients have a 'complex' form of the disorder with additional signs and symptoms, such as peripheral neuropathy, cerebellar ataxia, postural tremor, or urinary symptoms. The disorder is slowly progressive, and there is intrafamilial variability and incomplete penetrance (summary by Goizet et al., 2011 and Toft et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2C
MedGen UID:
342947
Concept ID:
C1853710
Disease or Syndrome
The autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders (previously considered to be clinically distinct phenotypes before their molecular basis was discovered) are now grouped into neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias; however, the overlap within each group is considerable. Affected individuals typically have either neuromuscular or skeletal manifestations alone, and in only rare instances an overlap syndrome has been reported. The three autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders (mildest to most severe) are: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C. Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy. The autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders are characterized by a congenital-onset, static, or later-onset progressive peripheral neuropathy with variable combinations of laryngeal dysfunction (i.e., vocal fold paresis), respiratory dysfunction, and joint contractures. The six autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias (mildest to most severe) are: Familial digital arthropathy-brachydactyly. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia. Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Maroteaux type. Parastremmatic dysplasia. Metatropic dysplasia. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by brachydactyly (in all 6); the five that are more severe have short stature that varies from mild to severe with progressive spinal deformity and involvement of the long bones and pelvis. In the mildest of the autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders life span is normal; in the most severe it is shortened. Bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) can occur with both autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias.
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy 2
MedGen UID:
340052
Concept ID:
C1853761
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is characterized by onset of ataxia between age three and 30 years after initial normal development, axonal sensorimotor neuropathy, oculomotor apraxia, cerebellar atrophy, and elevated serum concentration of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP).
Autosomal recessive distal spinal muscular atrophy 2
MedGen UID:
344189
Concept ID:
C1854023
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-2 (HMNR2) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of distal muscle weakness and wasting affecting the lower and upper limbs in the first decade; there is no sensory involvement (summary by Li et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive HMN, see HMNR1 (604320).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B1
MedGen UID:
343064
Concept ID:
C1854154
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease constitutes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. On the basis of electrophysiologic criteria, CMT is divided into 2 major types: type 1, the demyelinating form, characterized by a motor median nerve conduction velocity less than 38 m/s (see CMT1B; 118200); and type 2, the axonal form, with a normal or slightly reduced nerve conduction velocity. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4G
MedGen UID:
343122
Concept ID:
C1854449
Disease or Syndrome
HMSNR is an autosomal recessive progressive complex peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset in the first decade of distal lower limb weakness and muscle atrophy resulting in walking difficulties. Distal impairment of the upper limbs usually occurs later, as does proximal lower limb weakness. There is distal sensory impairment, with pes cavus and areflexia. Laboratory studies suggest that it is a myelinopathy resulting in reduced nerve conduction velocities in the demyelinating range as well as a length-dependent axonopathy (summary by Sevilla et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 14
MedGen UID:
343157
Concept ID:
C1854568
Disease or Syndrome
A rare complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of adulthood onset of slowly progressive spastic paraplegia of lower limbs presenting with spastic gait, hyperreflexia and mild lower limb hypertonicity associated with mild intellectual disability, visual agnosia, short and long-term memory deficiency and mild distal motor neuropathy. Bilateral pes cavus and extensor plantar responses are also associated.
Gaucher disease-ophthalmoplegia-cardiovascular calcification syndrome
MedGen UID:
341563
Concept ID:
C1856476
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
Friedreich ataxia 1
MedGen UID:
383962
Concept ID:
C1856689
Disease or Syndrome
Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is characterized by slowly progressive ataxia with onset usually before age 25 years (mean age at onset: 10-15 yrs). FRDA is typically associated with dysarthria, muscle weakness, spasticity particularly in the lower limbs, scoliosis, bladder dysfunction, absent lower-limb reflexes, and loss of position and vibration sense. Approximately two thirds of individuals with FRDA have cardiomyopathy, up to 30% have diabetes mellitus, and approximately 25% have an "atypical" presentation with later onset or retained tendon reflexes.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 29
MedGen UID:
346682
Concept ID:
C1857855
Disease or Syndrome
A complex form of hereditary spastic paraplegia characterised by a spastic paraplegia presenting in adolescence, associated with the additional manifestations of sensorial hearing impairment due to auditory neuropathy and persistent vomiting due to a hiatal or paraoesophageal hernia. The phenotype has been mapped to a locus on chromosome 1p31.1-p21.1.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 12
MedGen UID:
347618
Concept ID:
C1858106
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-12 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by lower limb spasticity and hyperreflexia, resulting in walking difficulties. Some patients may have urinary symptoms and distal sensory impairment. The age at onset is variable and can range from childhood to adulthood (summary by Montenegro et al., 2012). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B2
MedGen UID:
346869
Concept ID:
C1858278
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B2 (CMT4B2) is a demyelinating hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy characterized by abnormal folding of myelin sheaths. CMT4B1 (601382) is a clinically similar disorder caused by mutation in the MTMR2 gene (603557) on 11q22. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating CMT, see CMT4A (214400).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 11
MedGen UID:
388073
Concept ID:
C1858479
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 11 (SPG11) is characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs frequently associated with the following: mild intellectual disability with learning difficulties in childhood and/or progressive cognitive decline; peripheral neuropathy; pseudobulbar involvement; and increased reflexes in the upper limbs. Less frequent findings include: cerebellar signs (ataxia, nystagmus, saccadic pursuit); retinal degeneration; pes cavus; scoliosis; and parkinsonism with characteristic brain MRI features that include thinning of the corpus callosum. Onset occurs mainly during infancy or adolescence (range: age 1-31 years) and in rare cases as late as age 60 years. Most affected individuals become wheelchair bound one or two decades after disease onset.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 10
MedGen UID:
349003
Concept ID:
C1858712
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-10 (SPG10) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder with variable manifestations. Some patients have onset of a 'pure' spastic paraplegia, with lower limb spasticity, hyperreflexia, extensor plantar responses, and variable involvement of the upper limbs beginning in childhood or young adulthood. Some patients show distal sensory impairment, which can be part of the 'pure' phenotype. However, some patients also show an axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy with distal sensory impairment and distal muscle atrophy reminiscent of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (see, e.g., CMT2A, 118210). Rarely, patients with KIF5A mutations may have additional neurologic features, including parkinsonism or cognitive decline, consistent with a 'complicated' phenotype. Spastic paraplegia and peripheral neuropathy in isolation may represent extreme ends of the phenotypic spectrum of KIF5A mutations (summary by Goizet et al., 2009 and Crimella et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600).
Congenital cataracts-facial dysmorphism-neuropathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
346973
Concept ID:
C1858726
Congenital Abnormality
CTDP1-related congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, and neuropathy (CTDP1-CCFDN) is characterized by abnormalities of the eye (bilateral congenital cataracts, microcornea, microphthalmia, micropupils), mildly dysmorphic facial features apparent in late childhood, and a hypo-/demyelinating, symmetric, distal peripheral neuropathy. The neuropathy is predominantly motor at the onset and results in delays in early motor development, progressing to severe disability by the third decade of life. Secondary foot deformities and scoliosis are common. Sensory neuropathy develops after age ten years. Most affected individuals have a mild nonprogressive intellectual deficit and cerebellar involvement including ataxia, nystagmus, intention tremor, and dysmetria. All have short stature and most have subnormal weight. Adults have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Parainfectious rhabdomyolysis (profound muscle weakness, myoglobinuria, and excessively elevated serum concentration of creatine kinase usually following a viral infection) is a potentially life-threatening complication. To date all affected individuals and carriers identified have been from the Romani population.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 2
MedGen UID:
349134
Concept ID:
C1859298
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-2 is an neurologic disorder characterized by onset of impaired motor development and ataxic gait in early childhood. Additional features often include loss of fine motor skills, dysarthria, nystagmus, cerebellar signs, and delayed cognitive development with intellectual disability. Brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy. Overall, the disorder is non- or slowly progressive, with survival into adulthood (summary by Jobling et al., 2015).
Cerebellar ataxia and neurosensory deafness
MedGen UID:
395224
Concept ID:
C1859304
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia, early-onset, with oculomotor apraxia and hypoalbuminemia
MedGen UID:
395301
Concept ID:
C1859598
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1) is characterized by childhood onset of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, followed by oculomotor apraxia and a severe primary motor peripheral axonal motor neuropathy. The first manifestation is progressive gait imbalance (mean age of onset: 4.3 years; range: 2-10 years), followed by dysarthria, then upper-limb dysmetria with mild intention tremor. Oculomotor apraxia, usually noticed a few years after the onset of ataxia, progresses to external ophthalmoplegia. All affected individuals have generalized areflexia followed by a peripheral neuropathy and quadriplegia with loss of ambulation about seven to ten years after onset. Hands and feet are short and atrophic. Chorea and upper-limb dystonia are common. Intellect remains normal in some individuals; in others, different degrees of cognitive impairment have been observed.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A1
MedGen UID:
350076
Concept ID:
C1861678
Disease or Syndrome
MFN2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (MFN2-HMSN) is a classic axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, inherited in either an autosomal dominant (AD) manner (~90%) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner (~10%). MFN2-HMSN is characterized by more severe involvement of the lower extremities than the upper extremities, distal upper-extremity involvement as the neuropathy progresses, more prominent motor deficits than sensory deficits, and normal (>42 m/s) or only slightly decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCVs). Postural tremor is common. Median onset is age 12 years in the AD form and age eight years in the AR form. The prevalence of optic atrophy is approximately 7% in the AD form and approximately 20% in the AR form.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 8
MedGen UID:
400359
Concept ID:
C1863704
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 8 (SPG8) is a slowly progressive pure spastic paraplegia of the lower limbs (i.e., pyramidal signs including hyperreflexia, spasticity, and occasionally clonus without other neurologic findings). Some affected individuals have urinary urgency that usually becomes apparent at the same time as the spasticity. Onset is between ages ten and 59 years. Affected individuals often become wheelchair dependent. While intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability is high, SPG8 is typically more severe than other types of hereditary spastic paraplegia.
Giant axonal neuropathy 2
MedGen UID:
400593
Concept ID:
C1864695
Disease or Syndrome
Giant axonal neuropathy-2 is an autosomal dominant peripheral axonal neuropathy characterized by onset of distal sensory impairment and lower extremity muscle weakness and atrophy after the second decade. Foot deformities may be present in childhood. More severely affected individuals may develop cardiomyopathy. Sural nerve biopsy shows giant axonal swelling with neurofilament accumulation (summary by Klein et al., 2014).
Ichthyosis, hystrix-like, with hearing loss
MedGen UID:
355410
Concept ID:
C1865234
Disease or Syndrome
Hystrix-like ichthyosis with deafness (HID) is a disorder characterized by dry, scaly skin (ichthyosis) and hearing loss that is usually profound. Hystrix-like means resembling a porcupine; in this type of ichthyosis, the scales may be thick and spiky, giving the appearance of porcupine quills.\n\nNewborns with HID typically develop reddened skin. The skin abnormalities worsen over time, and the ichthyosis eventually covers most of the body, although the palms of the hands and soles of the feet are usually only mildly affected. Breaks in the skin may occur and in severe cases can lead to life-threatening infections. Affected individuals have an increased risk of developing a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma, which can also affect mucous membranes such as the inner lining of the mouth. People with HID may also have patchy hair loss caused by scarring on particular areas of skin.
Friedreich ataxia 2
MedGen UID:
356134
Concept ID:
C1865981
Disease or Syndrome
Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive gait and limb ataxia with associated limb muscle weakness, absent lower limb reflexes, extensor plantar responses, dysarthria, and decreased vibratory sense and proprioception. Onset is usually in the first or second decade, before the end of puberty (summary by Delatycki et al., 2000). For a general phenotypic description of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), see FRDA1 (229300), which is caused by mutation in the FXN gene (606829) on chromosome 9q13.
Vacuolar Neuromyopathy
MedGen UID:
355637
Concept ID:
C1866139
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed ubiquitin-positive autophagic vacuolation (MRUPAV) is characterized by adult onset of slowly progressive skeletal muscle weakness variably affecting the distal or proximal lower limbs. Some patients may also have upper limb involvement or neck muscle weakness, but respiratory and bulbar involvement only rarely occurs. EMG studies show a myopathic process, and myotonia may also be observed. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows myopathic features, rimmed vacuoles, and abnormal subsarcolemmal protein aggregation with activation of the autophagy pathway (Ruggieri et al., 2020).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C
MedGen UID:
356581
Concept ID:
C1866636
Disease or Syndrome
SH3TC2-related hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (SH3TC2-HMSN) is a demyelinating neuropathy characterized by severe spine deformities (scoliosis or kyphoscoliosis) and foot deformities (pes cavus, pes planus, or pes valgus) that typically present in the first decade of life or early adolescence. Other findings can include cranial nerve involvement (most commonly tongue involvement, facial weakness/paralysis, hearing impairment, dysarthria) and respiratory problems.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal dominant 1
MedGen UID:
356618
Concept ID:
C1866784
Disease or Syndrome
Distal hereditary motor neuronopathy (dHMN or HMN) is a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders caused by anterior horn cell degeneration and characterized by progressive distal motor weakness and muscular atrophy of the peripheral nervous system without sensory impairment. Distal HMN is also referred to as spinal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (spinal CMT). Distal HMN is often referred to as a 'neuronopathy' instead of a 'neuropathy' based on the hypothesis that the primary pathologic process resides in the neuron cell body and not in the axons (Irobi et al., 2006). Historically, Harding (1993) proposed a clinical classification of distal HMN into 7 phenotypic subtypes according to age at onset, mode of inheritance, and presence of additional features; see NOMENCLATURE. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuronopathy Genetically distinct forms of autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy include HMND1; HMND2 (158590), caused by mutation in the HSPB8 gene (608014); HMND3 (608634), caused by mutation in the HSPB1 gene (602195); HMND4 (613376), caused by mutation in the HSPB3 gene (604624); HMND5 (600794), caused by mutation in the GARS gene (600287); HMND6 (615575), caused by mutation in the FBXO38 gene (608533); HMND7 (158580), caused by mutation in the SLC5A7 gene (608761); HMND8 (600175), caused by mutation in the TRPV4 gene (605427); HMND9 (617721), caused by mutation in the WARS gene (191050); HMND10 (620080), caused by mutation in the EMILIN1 gene (130660); HMND11 (620528), caused by mutation in the SPTAN1 gene (182810); HMND12 (614751), caused by mutation in the REEP1 gene (609139); HMND13 (619112), caused by mutation in the BSCL2 gene (606158); and HMND14 (607641), caused by mutation in the DCTN1 gene (601143). See also X-linked HMN (HMNX; 300489), caused by mutation in the ATP7A gene (300011) on chromosome Xq21. Additional disorders with overlapping features include autosomal dominant ALS4 (602433), caused by mutation in the SETX gene (608465); and CMS7A (616040), caused by mutation in the SYT2 gene (600104).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 32
MedGen UID:
409967
Concept ID:
C1970009
Disease or Syndrome
A rare complex type of hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of slowly progressive spastic paraplegia (with walking difficulties appearing at onset at 6-7 years of age) associated with mild intellectual disability. Brain imaging reveals thin corpus callosum, cortical and cerebellar atrophy, and pontine dysraphia. The SPG32 phenotype has been mapped to a locus on chromosome 14q12-q21.
Spastic ataxia 1
MedGen UID:
409988
Concept ID:
C1970107
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary spastic ataxia comprises a heterogeneous group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by lower-limb spasticity and generalized ataxia with dysarthria, impaired ocular movements, and gait disturbance. Spastic ataxia-1 (SPAX1) is an autosomal dominant form of the disorder with onset between the ages of 10 and 20 years. Other clinical features are supranuclear gaze palsy, hyperreflexia, hypertonicity, dystonia, pes cavus, mild ptosis, and decreased vibration sense in the lower limbs. Symptom severity is variable, but neither life span nor cognition is affected (summary by Meijer et al., 2002 and Bourassa et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Spastic Ataxia See also SPAX2 (611302), caused by mutation in the KIF1C gene (603060) on chromosome 17p13; SPAX3 (611390), caused by rearrangements of the MARS2 gene (609728) on chromosome 2q33; SPAX4 (613672), caused by mutation in the MTPAP gene (613669) on chromosome 10p11; SPAX5 (614487), caused by mutation in the AFG3L2 gene (604581) on chromosome 18p11; SPAX6 (270550), caused by mutation in the SACS gene (604490) on chromosome 13q12; SPAX7 (108650); SPAX8 (617560), caused by mutation in the NKX6-2 gene (605955) on chromosome 8q21; SPAX9 (618438), caused by mutation in the CHP1 gene (606988) on chromosome 15q15; and SPAX10 (620666), caused by mutation in the COQ4 gene (612898) on chromosome 9q34.
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 5
MedGen UID:
370849
Concept ID:
C1970199
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Any autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the NSUN2 gene.
XFE progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
410064
Concept ID:
C1970416
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal recessive condition caused by mutation(s) in the ERCC4 gene, encoding DNA repair endonuclease XPF. it is characterized by characterized by cutaneous photosensitivity and progeroid features in multiple organ systems.
Multicentric carpo-tarsal osteolysis with or without nephropathy
MedGen UID:
436237
Concept ID:
C2674705
Disease or Syndrome
Multicentric carpotarsal osteolysis syndrome is a rare skeletal disorder, usually presenting in early childhood with a clinical picture mimicking juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Progressive destruction of the carpal and tarsal bone usually occurs and other bones may also be involved. Chronic renal failure is a frequent component of the syndrome. Mental retardation and minor facial anomalies have been noted in some patients. Autosomal dominant inheritance has been documented in many families (Pai and Macpherson, 1988). See also Torg-Winchester syndrome (259600), an autosomal recessive multicentric osteolysis syndrome.
PHARC syndrome
MedGen UID:
436373
Concept ID:
C2675204
Disease or Syndrome
Fiskerstrand type peripheral neuropathy is a slowly-progressive Refsum-like disorder associating signs of peripheral neuropathy with late-onset hearing loss, cataract and pigmentary retinopathy that become evident during the third decade of life.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 42
MedGen UID:
393407
Concept ID:
C2675528
Disease or Syndrome
A pure form of hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of slowly progressive spastic paraplegia of lower extremities with an age of onset ranging from childhood to adulthood and patients presenting with spastic gait, increased tendon reflexes in lower limbs, extensor plantar response, weakness and atrophy of lower limb muscles and, in rare cases, pes cavus. No abnormalities are noted on magnetic resonance imaging.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 38
MedGen UID:
436764
Concept ID:
C2676732
Disease or Syndrome
A complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of mild to severe lower limbs spasticity, hyperreflexia, extensor plantar responses, pes cavus and significant wasting and weakness of the small hand muscles. Impaired vibration sensation, temporal lobe epilepsy and cognitive dysfunction were also reported.
Autosomal recessive ataxia due to ubiquinone deficiency
MedGen UID:
436985
Concept ID:
C2677589
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 43
MedGen UID:
760531
Concept ID:
C2680446
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-43 (SPG43) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by childhood onset of progressive spasticity affecting the lower and upper limbs (summary by Meilleur et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see 270800.
Paraplegia-intellectual disability-hyperkeratosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
411554
Concept ID:
C2745996
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has characteristics of intellectual deficit, spasticity in the lower limbs (spastic paraplegia), pes cavus deformity of both feet, an abnormal gait, and palmar and plantar hyperkeratosis. It has been reported in four brothers. The mother of the affected boys had normal intelligence, plantar hyperkeratosis and a strong facial resemblance to her retarded sons. Her three daughters were normal. This syndrome most likely an X-linked recessive condition.
Chromosome Xp11.23-p11.22 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
440690
Concept ID:
C2749022
Disease or Syndrome
Familial and <i>de novo</i> recurrent Xp11.22-p11.23 microduplication has been recently identified in males and females.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 9B
MedGen UID:
440765
Concept ID:
C2749346
Disease or Syndrome
Adult Refsum disease (ARD is associated with elevated plasma phytanic acid levels, late childhood-onset (or later) retinitis pigmentosa, and variable combinations of anosmia, polyneuropathy, deafness, ataxia, and ichthyosis. Onset of symptoms ranges from age seven months to older than age 50 years. Cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure caused by cardiomyopathy are potentially severe health problems that develop later in life.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 18
MedGen UID:
442343
Concept ID:
C2749936
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-18B (SPG18B) is a severe autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset in early childhood of progressive spastic paraplegia resulting in motor disability. Most affected individuals have severe psychomotor retardation. Some may develop significant joint contractures (summary by Alazami et al., 2011 and Yildirim et al., 2011).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2N
MedGen UID:
413754
Concept ID:
C2750090
Disease or Syndrome
A mild form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, with characteristics of distal legs sensory loss and weakness that can be asymmetric. Tendon reflexes are reduced in the knees and absent in ankles. Progression is slow.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 44
MedGen UID:
413042
Concept ID:
C2750784
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare, complex form of hereditary spastic paraplegia characterised by a late-onset, slowly progressive spastic paraplegia associated with mild ataxia and dysarthria, upper extremity involvement (i.e. loss of finger dexterity, dysmetria), and mild cognitive impairment, without the presence of nystagmus. A hypomyelinating leucodystrophy and thin corpus callosum is observed in all cases and psychomotor development is normal or near normal. Caused by mutations in the GJC2 gene (1q41-q42) encoding the gap junction gamma-2 protein.
Myofibrillar myopathy 6
MedGen UID:
414119
Concept ID:
C2751831
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-6 is an autosomal dominant severe neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset in the first decade of rapidly progressive generalized and proximal muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, cardiomyopathy, and skeletal deformities related to muscle weakness. Muscle biopsy shows fiber-type grouping, disruption of the Z lines, and filamentous inclusions, and sural nerve biopsy shows a neuropathy, often with giant axonal neurons. Most patients are severely affected by the second decade and need cardiac transplant, ventilation, and/or a wheelchair (summary by Jaffer et al., 2012). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy (MFM), see MFM1 (601419).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 46
MedGen UID:
473687
Concept ID:
C2828721
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia-46 (SPG46) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset in childhood of slowly progressive spastic paraplegia and cerebellar signs. Some patients have cognitive impairment, cataracts, and cerebral, cerebellar, and corpus callosum atrophy on brain imaging (summary by Boukhris et al., 2010 and Martin et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see SPG5A (270800).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 17
MedGen UID:
419034
Concept ID:
C2931276
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of BSCL2-related neurologic disorders includes Silver syndrome and variants of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2, distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) type V, and spastic paraplegia 17. Features of these disorders include onset of symptoms ranging from the first to the seventh decade, slow disease progression, upper motor neuron involvement (gait disturbance with pyramidal signs ranging from mild to severe spasticity with hyperreflexia in the lower limbs and variable extensor plantar responses), lower motor neuron involvement (amyotrophy of the peroneal muscles and small muscles of the hand), and pes cavus and other foot deformities. Disease severity is variable among and within families.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 3A
MedGen UID:
419393
Concept ID:
C2931355
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 3A (SPG3A; also known as ATL1-HSP) is characterized by progressive bilateral and mostly symmetric spasticity and weakness of the legs. Compared to other forms of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), in which diminished vibration sense (caused by degeneration of the corticospinal tracts and dorsal columns) and urinary bladder hyperactivity are present in all affected individuals, these findings occur in a minority of individuals with SPG3A. The average age of onset is four years. More than 80% of reported individuals manifest spastic gait before the end of the first decade of life. Most persons with early-onset ATL1-HSP have a "pure" ("uncomplicated") HSP; however, complicated HSP with axonal motor neuropathy and/or distal amyotrophy with lower motor neuron involvement (Silver syndrome phenotype) has been observed. The rate of progression in ATL1-HSP is slow, and wheelchair dependency or need for a walking aid (cane, walker, or wheelchair) is relatively rare.
Infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis
MedGen UID:
419413
Concept ID:
C2931441
Disease or Syndrome
ALS2-related disorder involves retrograde degeneration of the upper motor neurons of the pyramidal tracts and comprises a clinical continuum of the following three phenotypes: Infantile ascending hereditary spastic paraplegia (IAHSP), characterized by onset of spasticity with increased reflexes and sustained clonus of the lower limbs within the first two years of life, progressive weakness and spasticity of the upper limbs by age seven to eight years, and wheelchair dependence in the second decade with progression toward severe spastic tetraparesis and a pseudobulbar syndrome caused by progressive cranial nerve involvement. Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis (JPLS), characterized by upper motor neuron findings of pseudobulbar palsy and spastic quadriplegia without dementia or cerebellar, extrapyramidal, or sensory signs. Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (JALS or ALS2), characterized by onset between ages three and 20 years. All affected individuals show a spastic pseudobulbar syndrome (spasticity of speech and swallowing) together with spastic paraplegia. Some individuals are bedridden by age 12 to 50 years.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 36
MedGen UID:
422457
Concept ID:
C2936879
Disease or Syndrome
A complex form of hereditary spastic paraplegia, with onset in childhood or adulthood of progressive spastic paraplegia (with spastic gait, spasticity, lower limb weakness, pes cavus and urinary urgency) associated with the additional manifestation of peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. The SPG36 phenotype has been mapped to a locus on chromosome 12q23-q24.
Chromosome 16p13.3 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
462058
Concept ID:
C3150708
Disease or Syndrome
16p13.3 microduplication syndrome is a rare chromosomal anomaly syndrome resulting from a partial duplication of the short arm of chromosome 16 and manifesting with a variable phenotype which is mostly characterized by: mild to moderate intellectual deficit and developmental delay (particularly speech), normal growth, short, proximally implanted thumbs and other hand and feet malformations (such as camptodactyly, syndactyly, club feet), mild arthrogryposis and characteristic facies (upslanting, narrow palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, mid face hypoplasia, bulbous nasal tip and low set ears). Other reported manifestations include cryptorchidism, inguinal hernia and behavioral problems.
Chromosome 6q11-q14 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
462140
Concept ID:
C3150790
Disease or Syndrome
The cardinal features of chromosome 6q11-q14 interstitial deletions include hypotonia, short stature, skeletal/limb anomalies, umbilical hernia, and urinary tract anomalies, as well as characteristic facial features including upslanting palpebral fissures, low-set and/or dysplastic ears, and high-arched palate (summary by Wang et al., 2009).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease recessive intermediate B
MedGen UID:
462247
Concept ID:
C3150897
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare subtype of autosomal recessive intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease characterized by a CMT neuropathy associated with developmental delay, self-abusive behavior, dysmorphic features and vestibular Schwannoma. Motor nerve conduction velocities demonstrate features of both demyelinating and axonal pathology.
Neuropathy, hereditary sensory, type 1D
MedGen UID:
462322
Concept ID:
C3150972
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 3A (SPG3A; also known as ATL1-HSP) is characterized by progressive bilateral and mostly symmetric spasticity and weakness of the legs. Compared to other forms of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), in which diminished vibration sense (caused by degeneration of the corticospinal tracts and dorsal columns) and urinary bladder hyperactivity are present in all affected individuals, these findings occur in a minority of individuals with SPG3A. The average age of onset is four years. More than 80% of reported individuals manifest spastic gait before the end of the first decade of life. Most persons with early-onset ATL1-HSP have a "pure" ("uncomplicated") HSP; however, complicated HSP with axonal motor neuropathy and/or distal amyotrophy with lower motor neuron involvement (Silver syndrome phenotype) has been observed. The rate of progression in ATL1-HSP is slow, and wheelchair dependency or need for a walking aid (cane, walker, or wheelchair) is relatively rare.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 10
MedGen UID:
462348
Concept ID:
C3150998
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-10 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with onset in the teenage or young adult years of gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, and nystagmus associated with marked cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging (summary by Vermeer et al., 2010). Some patients have low levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in muscle and may show some clinical improvement with CoQ10 treatment (Balreira et al., 2014).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2O
MedGen UID:
481850
Concept ID:
C3280220
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic subtype of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 with characteristics of early childhood-onset of slowly progressive, predominantly distal, lower limb muscle weakness and atrophy, delayed motor development, variable sensory loss and pes cavus in the presence of normal or near-normal nerve conduction velocities. Additional variable features may include proximal muscle weakness, abnormal gait, arthrogryposis, scoliosis, cognitive impairment, and spasticity. Caused by heterozygous mutation in the DYNC1H1 gene on chromosome 14q32.
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 4
MedGen UID:
482001
Concept ID:
C3280371
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration (MPAN) is characterized initially by gait changes followed by progressive spastic paresis, progressive dystonia (which may be limited to the hands and feet or more generalized), neuropsychiatric abnormalities (emotional lability, depression, anxiety, impulsivity, compulsions, hallucinations, perseveration, inattention, and hyperactivity), and cognitive decline. Additional early findings can include dysphagia, dysarthria, optic atrophy, axonal neuropathy, parkinsonism, and bowel/bladder incontinence. Survival is usually well into adulthood. End-stage disease is characterized by severe dementia, spasticity, dystonia, and parkinsonism.
Distal myopathy, Tateyama type
MedGen UID:
482073
Concept ID:
C3280443
Disease or Syndrome
CAV3-related distal myopathy is one form of distal myopathy, a group of disorders characterized by weakness and loss of function affecting the muscles farthest from the center of the body (distal muscles), such as those of the hands and feet. People with CAV3-related distal myopathy experience wasting (atrophy) and weakness of the small muscles in the hands and feet that generally become noticeable in adulthood. A bump or other sudden impact on the muscles, especially those in the forearms, may cause them to exhibit repetitive tensing (percussion-induced rapid contraction). The rapid contractions can continue for up to 30 seconds and may be painful. Overgrowth (hypertrophy) of the calf muscles can also occur in CAV3-related distal myopathy. The muscles closer to the center of the body (proximal muscles) such as the thighs and upper arms are normal in this condition.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2P
MedGen UID:
482427
Concept ID:
C3280797
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic axonal hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy disorder with characteristics of adulthood-onset of slowly progressive, occasionally asymmetrical, distal muscle weakness and atrophy (predominantly in the lower limbs), pan-modal sensory loss, muscle cramping in extremities and/or trunk, pes cavus and absent or reduced deep tendon reflexes. Gait anomalies and variable autonomic disturbances, such as erectile dysfunction and urinary urgency, may be associated. The disease can be caused by homozygous or heterozygous mutation in the LRSAM1 gene on chromosome 9q33.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1E
MedGen UID:
501212
Concept ID:
C3495591
Disease or Syndrome
A rare subtype of CMT1 characterized by a variable clinical presentation. Onset within the first two years of life with a delay in walking is not uncommon; however, onset may occur later. CMT1E is caused by point mutations in the <i>PMP22</i> (17p12) gene. The disease severity depends on the particular <i>PMP22</i> mutation, with some cases being very mild and even resembling hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, while others having an earlier onset with a more severe phenotype (reminiscent of Dejerine-Sottas syndrome) than that seen in CMT1A, caused by gene duplication. These severe cases may also report deafness and much slower motor nerve conduction velocities compared to CMT1A patients.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 54
MedGen UID:
761341
Concept ID:
C3539495
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-54 (SPG54) is a complicated form of spastic paraplegia, a neurodegenerative disorder affecting fibers of the corticospinal tract. Affected individuals have delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and early-onset spasticity of the lower limbs. Brain MRI shows a thin corpus callosum and periventricular white matter lesions. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy shows an abnormal lipid peak (summary by Schuurs-Hoeijmakers et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see 270800.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4F
MedGen UID:
761704
Concept ID:
C3540453
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4F is an autosomal recessive demyelinating neuropathy characterized by distal sensory impairment and distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the lower more than the upper limbs. Nerve conduction velocities are decreased and sural nerve biopsy shows loss of myelinated fibers. The age at onset is variable and can range from childhood to adult years. When the onset is in infancy, the phenotype is characterized as Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS; 145900). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 5B
MedGen UID:
762202
Concept ID:
C3542026
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX2 gene have cells of complementation group 5 (CG5, equivalent to CG10 and CGF). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 5B
MedGen UID:
766570
Concept ID:
C3553656
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-12 (HMND12) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset in the first or second decade of distal muscle weakness and atrophy, primarily affecting the intrinsic hand muscles, but also affecting the lower legs, resulting in abnormal gait and pes cavus (summary by Beetz et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant distal HMN, see HMND1 (182960).
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 6B
MedGen UID:
766862
Concept ID:
C3553948
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood. Some patients with PEX10 mutations have a milder disorder characterized by childhood-onset cerebellar ataxia and neuropathy without mental retardation (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX10 gene have cells of complementation group 7 (CG7, equivalent to CGB). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 8
MedGen UID:
767123
Concept ID:
C3554209
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 8 is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe psychomotor retardation, abnormal movements, hypotonia, spasticity, and variable visual defects. Brain MRI shows pontocerebellar hypoplasia, decreased cerebral white matter, and a thin corpus callosum (summary by Mochida et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1 (607596).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2Q
MedGen UID:
767280
Concept ID:
C3554366
Disease or Syndrome
A rare subtype of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 with characteristics of adolescent to adulthood-onset of symmetrical, slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy (with a predominant weakness of the distal lower limbs) associated with reduced or absent deep tendon reflexes, pes cavus and mild to moderated deep sensory impairment. There is evidence this disease is caused by a heterozygous loss-of-function mutation in the DHTKD1 gene on chromosome 10p14.
Lower motor neuron syndrome with late-adult onset
MedGen UID:
767312
Concept ID:
C3554398
Disease or Syndrome
CHCHD10-related disorders are characterized by a spectrum of adult-onset neurologic phenotypes that can include: Mitochondrial myopathy (may also be early onset): weakness, amyotrophy, exercise intolerance. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): progressive degeneration of upper motor neurons and lower motor neurons. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD): slowly progressive behavioral changes, language disturbances, cognitive decline, extrapyramidal signs. Late-onset spinal motor neuronopathy (SMA, Jokela type): weakness, cramps, and/or fasciculations; areflexia. Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy: slowly progressive lower-leg muscle weakness and atrophy, small hand muscle weakness, loss of tendon reflexes, sensory abnormalities. Cerebellar ataxia: gait ataxia, kinetic ataxia (progressive loss of coordination of lower- and upper-limb movements), dysarthria/dysphagia, nystagmus, cerebellar oculomotor disorder. Because of the recent discovery of CHCHD10-related disorders and the limited number of affected individuals reported to date, the natural history of these disorders (except for SMAJ caused by the p.Gly66Val pathogenic variant) is largely unknown.
Steel syndrome
MedGen UID:
767508
Concept ID:
C3554594
Disease or Syndrome
Steel syndrome is characterized by characteristic facies, dislocated hips and radial heads, carpal coalition (fusion of carpal bones), short stature, scoliosis, and cervical spine anomalies. The dislocated hips are resistant to surgical intervention (summary by Flynn et al., 2010).
Actin accumulation myopathy
MedGen UID:
777997
Concept ID:
C3711389
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-2A (CMYP2A) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by infantile- or childhood-onset myopathy with delayed motor milestones and nonprogressive muscle weakness. Of the patients with congenital myopathy caused by mutation in the ACTA1 gene, about 90% carry heterozygous mutations that are usually de novo and cause the severe infantile phenotype (CMYP2C; 620278). Some patients with de novo mutations have a more typical and milder disease course with delayed motor development and proximal muscle weakness, but are able to achieve independent ambulation. Less frequently, autosomal dominant transmission of the disorder within a family may occur when the ACTA1 mutation produces a phenotype compatible with adult life. Of note, intrafamilial variability has also been reported: a severely affected proband may be identified and then mildly affected or even asymptomatic relatives are found to carry the same mutation. The severity of the disease most likely depends on the detrimental effect of the mutation, although there are probably additional modifying factors (Ryan et al., 2001; Laing et al., 2009; Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001; Agrawal et al., 2004; Nowak et al., 2013; Sewry et al., 2019; Laitila and Wallgren-Pettersson, 2021). The most common histologic finding on muscle biopsy in patients with ACTA1 mutations is the presence of 'nemaline rods,' which represent abnormal thread- or rod-like structures ('nema' is Greek for 'thread'). However, skeletal muscle biopsy from patients with mutations in the ACTA1 gene can show a range of pathologic phenotypes. These include classic rods, intranuclear rods, clumped filaments, cores, or fiber-type disproportion, all of which are nonspecific pathologic findings and not pathognomonic of a specific congenital myopathy. Most patients have clinically severe disease, regardless of the histopathologic phenotype (Nowak et al., 2007; Sewry et al., 2019). ACTA1 mutations are the second most common cause of congenital myopathies classified histologically as 'nemaline myopathy' after mutations in the NEB gene (161650). ACTA1 mutations are overrepresented in the severe phenotype with early death (Laing et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM2 (256030).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease X-linked dominant 6
MedGen UID:
813032
Concept ID:
C3806702
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic principally axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy with an X-linked dominant inheritance pattern and the childhood-onset of slowly progressive, moderate to severe, distal muscle weakness and atrophy of the lower extremities, as well as distal, pan modal sensory abnormalities, bilateral foot deformities (pes cavus, clawed toes), absent ankle reflexes and gait abnormalities (steppage gait). Females are usually asymptomatic or only present mild manifestations (mild postural hand tremor, mild wasting of hand intrinsic muscles).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease recessive intermediate C
MedGen UID:
815639
Concept ID:
C3809309
Disease or Syndrome
CMTRIC is an autosomal recessive peripheral neuropathy characterized by distal sensory impairment predominantly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in walking difficulties due to muscle weakness and atrophy. The upper limbs may also be affected. Electrophysiologic studies and sural nerve biopsy show mixed features of demyelinating and axonal neuropathy. The age at onset and the severity of the disease are variable (summary by Azzedine et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive intermediate CMT, see CMTRIA (608340).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2R
MedGen UID:
815985
Concept ID:
C3809655
Disease or Syndrome
A rare subtype of axonal hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy characterised by early-onset axial hypotonia, generalised muscle weakness, absent deep tendon reflexes and decreased muscle mass. Electromyography reveals decreased motor nerve conduction velocities with markedly reduced sensory and motor amplitudes. There is evidence the disease is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation in the TRIM2 gene on chromosome 4q.
Early-onset progressive neurodegeneration-blindness-ataxia-spasticity syndrome
MedGen UID:
815995
Concept ID:
C3809665
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-79B (SPG79B) is an autosomal recessive progressive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of spastic paraplegia and optic atrophy in the first decade of life. Additional features are variable, but may include peripheral neuropathy, cerebellar ataxia, and cognitive impairment (summary by Rydning et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see SPG5A (270800).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 72
MedGen UID:
816490
Concept ID:
C3810160
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary spastic paraplegia-72A (SPG72A) is a pure form of spastic paraplegia with onset of difficulty walking and stiff legs associated with hyperreflexia and extensor plantar responses in early childhood. The disorder is slowly progressive, and some patients develop the need for assistance in walking. Some patients may have pes cavus or sphincter disturbances. Cognition, speech, and ocular function are normal (summary by Esteves et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2I
MedGen UID:
854756
Concept ID:
C3888087
Disease or Syndrome
A form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. A late onset with severe sensory loss associated with distal weakness mainly of the legs and absent or reduced deep tendon reflexes.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 2D
MedGen UID:
854832
Concept ID:
C3888271
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-6 (HMND6) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive distal lower limb weakness and atrophy between the second and fourth decades of life. Weakness usually begins in the calf muscles and later involves more proximal muscles. The severity is variable, and some patients have difficulty walking or running. Most also have upper limb involvement, particularly of the triceps and intrinsic hand muscles. Some patients may lose independent ambulation later in the disease course. Sensory impairment is typically not present, and cognition and bulbar function are normal (summary by Sumner et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant distal HMN (dHMN), see HMND1 (182960).
Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder 2
MedGen UID:
863113
Concept ID:
C4014676
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder-2 is an autosomal recessive syndrome resulting from defects in DNA excision repair. Affected individuals have a neurodegenerative phenotype characterized by developmental delay, ataxia, and sensorineural hearing loss. Other features include short stature, cutaneous and ocular telangiectasia, and photosensitivity (summary by Baple et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ATLD, see ATLD1 (604391).
LIPE-related familial partial lipodystrophy
MedGen UID:
863306
Concept ID:
C4014869
Disease or Syndrome
Familial partial lipodystrophy type 6 (FPLD6) is characterized by abnormal subcutaneous fat distribution, with variable excess accumulation of fat in the face, neck, shoulders, axillae, back, abdomen, and pubic region, and reduction in subcutaneous fat of the lower extremities. Progressive adult-onset myopathy is seen in some patients, and there is variable association with diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and hepatic steatosis (Zolotov et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660.
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
863475
Concept ID:
C4015038
Disease or Syndrome
Presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome-7A with distal motor neuropathy (CMS7A) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of foot deformities, delayed motor development, and slowly progressive distal muscle weakness resulting in gait difficulties in early childhood. Other features may include hyporeflexia, muscle atrophy, and upper limb involvement. Electrophysiologic studies show low compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), consistent with a distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), as well as a decremental response to repetitive stimulation, indicating presynaptic defects at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), consistent with myasthenic syndrome (summary by Fionda et al., 2021). The complex phenotype of patients with dominant SYT2 mutations likely results from impairment of 2 fundamental functions of SYT2: (1) disturbance of calcium-dependent synchronous presynaptic neurotransmitter release, resulting in a myasthenic disorder, and (2) disruption of exocytosis and endocytosis, causing a degenerative process affecting peripheral motor nerve terminals and resulting in a motor neuropathy (Maselli et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of dHMN, see 182960.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 29
MedGen UID:
863578
Concept ID:
C4015141
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
SETBP1 haploinsufficiency disorder (SETBP1-HD) is characterized by hypotonia and mild motor developmental delay; intellectual abilities ranging from normal to severe disability; speech and language disorder; behavioral problems (most commonly attention/concentration deficits and hyperactivity, impulsivity), and refractive errors and strabismus. Typically children with SETBP1-HD whose intellect is in the normal or borderline range (IQ 80-90) were diagnosed following genetic testing for behavioral problems and/or severe speech and language disorders (respectively: the inability to produce sounds in words correctly, and deficits in the understanding and/or expression of words and sentences). To date, 47 individuals with SETBP1-HD have been reported.
Perrault syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
863744
Concept ID:
C4015307
Disease or Syndrome
Perrault syndrome is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in males and females and ovarian dysfunction in females. SNHL is bilateral and ranges from profound with prelingual (congenital) onset to moderate with early-childhood onset. When onset is in early childhood, hearing loss can be progressive. Ovarian dysfunction ranges from gonadal dysgenesis (absent or streak gonads) manifesting as primary amenorrhea to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) defined as cessation of menses before age 40 years. Fertility in affected males is reported as normal (although the number of reported males is limited). Neurologic features described in some individuals with Perrault syndrome include learning difficulties and developmental delay, cerebellar ataxia, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 1
MedGen UID:
897191
Concept ID:
C4225153
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 19
MedGen UID:
897962
Concept ID:
C4225235
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-19 (CMS19) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a defect in the neuromuscular junction, causing generalized muscle weakness, exercise intolerance, and respiratory insufficiency. Patients present with hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and respiratory problems soon after birth, but the severity of the weakness and disease course is variable (summary by Logan et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 5
MedGen UID:
900333
Concept ID:
C4225237
Disease or Syndrome
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP) is a peroxisomal disorder characterized by disproportionately short stature primarily affecting the proximal parts of the extremities, a typical facial appearance including a broad nasal bridge, epicanthus, high-arched palate, dysplastic external ears, and micrognathia, congenital contractures, characteristic ocular involvement, dwarfism, and severe mental retardation with spasticity. Biochemically, plasmalogen synthesis and phytanic acid alpha-oxidation are defective. Most patients die in the first decade of life (summary by Wanders and Waterham, 2005). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, see 215100.
Short stature, microcephaly, and endocrine dysfunction
MedGen UID:
895448
Concept ID:
C4225288
Disease or Syndrome
In patients with SSMED, short stature and microcephaly are apparent at birth, and there is progressive postnatal growth failure. Endocrine dysfunction, including hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, multinodular goiter, and diabetes mellitus, is present in affected adults. Progressive ataxia has been reported in some patients, with onset ranging from the second to fifth decade of life. In addition, a few patients have developed tumors, suggesting that there may be a predisposition to tumorigenesis. In contrast to syndromes involving defects in other components of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) complex (see, e.g., 606593), no clinically overt immunodeficiency has been observed in SSMED, although laboratory analysis has revealed lymphopenia or borderline leukopenia in some patients (Murray et al., 2015; Bee et al., 2015; de Bruin et al., 2015; Guo et al., 2015).
Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, type 6B
MedGen UID:
895482
Concept ID:
C4225302
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type VIB is an autosomal recessive complex progressive neurologic disorder characterized mainly by early-onset optic atrophy resulting in progressive visual loss and peripheral axonal sensorimotor neuropathy with highly variable age at onset and severity. Affected individuals may also have cerebellar or pontocerebellar atrophy on brain imaging, and they may show abnormal movements such as ataxia, dysmetria, and myoclonus (summary by Abrams et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HMSN6, see HMSN6A (601152).
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
896058
Concept ID:
C4225385
Disease or Syndrome
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome-8 (LCCS8), an axoglial form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, is characterized by congenital distal joint contractures, reduced fetal movements, and severe motor paralysis leading to death early in the neonatal period (Laquerriere et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lethal congenital contracture syndrome, see LCCS1 (253310).
Intellectual disability, X-linked 99, syndromic, female-restricted
MedGen UID:
899839
Concept ID:
C4225416
Disease or Syndrome
Female-restricted X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder-99 (MRXS99F) is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and mild to moderate intellectual disability. Affected females can have a wide range of additional congenital anomalies, including scoliosis, postaxial polydactyly, mild cardiac or urogenital anomalies, dysmorphic facial features, and mild structural brain abnormalities (summary by Reijnders et al., 2016).
Singleton-Merten syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
899946
Concept ID:
C4225427
Disease or Syndrome
Singleton-Merten syndrome (SGMRT) is an uncommon autosomal dominant disorder characterized by abnormalities of blood vessels, teeth, and bone. Calcifications of the aorta and aortic and mitral valves occur in childhood or puberty and can lead to early death. Dental findings include delayed primary tooth exfoliation and permanent tooth eruption, truncated tooth root formation, early-onset periodontal disease, and severe root and alveolar bone resorption associated with dysregulated mineralization, leading to tooth loss. Osseous features consist of osteoporosis, either generalized or limited to distal extremities, distal limb osteolysis, widened medullary cavities, and easy tearing of tendons from bone. Less common features are mild facial dysmorphism (high anterior hair line, broad forehead, smooth philtrum, thin upper vermilion border), generalized muscle weakness, psoriasis, early-onset glaucoma, and recurrent infections. The disorder manifests with variable inter- and intrafamilial phenotypes (summary by Rutsch et al., 2015). Genetic Heterogeneity of Singleton-Merten Syndrome An atypical form of Singleton-Merten syndrome (SGMRT2; 616298) is caused by mutation in the DDX58 gene (609631) on chromosome 9p21.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease dominant intermediate E
MedGen UID:
928336
Concept ID:
C4302667
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease E with focal segmental glomerulonephritis is characterized by the neurologic features of CMT, including distal muscle weakness and atrophy and distal sensory loss, and the features of FSGS, including proteinuria, progression to end-stage renal disease, and a characteristic histologic pattern on renal biopsy (summary by Boyer et al., 2011). Isolated focal segmental glomerulosclerosis-5 (FSGS5; 613237) is also caused by heterozygous mutation in the INF2 gene. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMTDI, see 606482.
Myofibrillar myopathy 8
MedGen UID:
934612
Concept ID:
C4310645
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-8 (MFM8) is an autosomal recessive myopathy characterized by slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the upper and lower limbs, resulting in increased falls, gait problems, difficulty running or climbing stairs, and upper limb weakness or scapular winging. Some patients develop distal muscle weakness and atrophy. The phenotype may also be consistent with a clinical diagnosis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Age at symptom onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. Ambulation is generally preserved and cardiac involvement is rare, but respiratory compromise with decreased forced vital capacity often occurs. Muscle biopsy shows a mix of myopathic features, including myofibrillar inclusions and sarcomeric disorganization; some patients have been reported to have dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy (O'Grady et al., 2016; Daimaguler et al., 2021). There is significant phenotypic variation, even in patients with the same mutation, which must be taken into account when counseling affecting individuals (Woods et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Myofibrillar myopathy 7
MedGen UID:
934678
Concept ID:
C4310711
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-7 (MFM7) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by early childhood onset of slowly progressive muscle weakness that primarily affects the lower limbs and is associated with joint contractures (summary by Straussberg et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, autosomal recessive, type 2a2b;
MedGen UID:
934692
Concept ID:
C4310725
Disease or Syndrome
MFN2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (MFN2-HMSN) is a classic axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, inherited in either an autosomal dominant (AD) manner (~90%) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner (~10%). MFN2-HMSN is characterized by more severe involvement of the lower extremities than the upper extremities, distal upper-extremity involvement as the neuropathy progresses, more prominent motor deficits than sensory deficits, and normal (>42 m/s) or only slightly decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCVs). Postural tremor is common. Median onset is age 12 years in the AD form and age eight years in the AR form. The prevalence of optic atrophy is approximately 7% in the AD form and approximately 20% in the AR form.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 43
MedGen UID:
934730
Concept ID:
C4310763
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-43 is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive neurologic disorder characterized by adult-onset gait and limb ataxia and often associated with peripheral neuropathy mainly affecting the motor system, although some patients may have distal sensory impairment (summary by Depondt et al., 2016). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Trichothiodystrophy 6, nonphotosensitive
MedGen UID:
934752
Concept ID:
C4310785
Disease or Syndrome
Trichothiodystrophy is also associated with recurrent infections, particularly respiratory infections, which can be life-threatening. People with trichothiodystrophy may have abnormal red blood cells, including red blood cells that are smaller than normal. They may also have elevated levels of a type of hemoglobin called A2, which is a protein found in red blood cells. Other features of trichothiodystrophy can include dry, scaly skin (ichthyosis); abnormalities of the fingernails and toenails; clouding of the lens in both eyes from birth (congenital cataracts); poor coordination; and skeletal abnormalities including degeneration of both hips at an early age.\n\nAbout half of all people with trichothiodystrophy have a photosensitive form of the disorder, which causes them to be extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight. They develop a severe sunburn after spending just a few minutes in the sun. However, for reasons that are unclear, they do not develop other sun-related problems such as excessive freckling of the skin or an increased risk of skin cancer. Many people with trichothiodystrophy report that they do not sweat.\n\nIntellectual disability and delayed development are common in people with trichothiodystrophy, although most affected individuals are highly social with an outgoing and engaging personality. Some people with trichothiodystrophy have brain abnormalities that can be seen with imaging tests. A common neurological feature of this disorder is impaired myelin production (dysmyelination). Myelin is a fatty substance that insulates nerve cells and promotes the rapid transmission of nerve impulses.\n\nMothers of children with trichothiodystrophy may experience problems during pregnancy including pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (preeclampsia) and a related condition called HELLP syndrome that can damage the liver. Babies with trichothiodystrophy are at increased risk of premature birth, low birth weight, and slow growth. Most children with trichothiodystrophy have short stature compared to others their age. \n\nThe signs and symptoms of trichothiodystrophy vary widely. Mild cases may involve only the hair. More severe cases also cause delayed development, significant intellectual disability, and recurrent infections; severely affected individuals may survive only into infancy or early childhood.\n\nIn people with trichothiodystrophy, tests show that the hair is lacking sulfur-containing proteins that normally gives hair its strength. A cross section of a cut hair shows alternating light and dark banding that has been described as a "tiger tail."\n\nTrichothiodystrophy, commonly called TTD, is a rare inherited condition that affects many parts of the body. The hallmark of this condition is hair that is sparse and easily broken. 
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2CC
MedGen UID:
934757
Concept ID:
C4310790
Disease or Syndrome
Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2CC is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy that predominantly affects the lower limbs, resulting in muscle weakness and atrophy and gait impairment. Other features include distal sensory impairment and less severe involvement of the upper limbs. The age at onset and severity are variable (summary by Rebelo et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
MYPN-related myopathy
MedGen UID:
1384302
Concept ID:
C4479186
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-24 (CMYP24) is an autosomal recessive congenital myopathy characterized by onset of slowly progressive muscle weakness in the first decade. Affected individuals present with gait difficulties due to proximal muscle weakness and atrophy mainly affecting the lower limbs and neck. Muscle biopsy shows nemaline bodies. Some patients may have mild cardiac or respiratory involvement, but they do not have respiratory failure (summary by Miyatake et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see 117000. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see 256030.
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 6
MedGen UID:
1387791
Concept ID:
C4517377
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation refers to a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motor and cognitive dysfunction beginning in childhood or young adulthood. Patients show extrapyramidal motor signs, such as spasticity, dystonia, and parkinsonism. Brain imaging shows iron accumulation in the basal ganglia (summary by Dusi et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of NBIA, see NBIA1 (234200).
Skraban-Deardorff syndrome
MedGen UID:
1627555
Concept ID:
C4539927
Disease or Syndrome
WDR26-related intellectual disability (ID) is characterized by developmental delay / intellectual disability, characteristic facial features, hypotonia, epilepsy, and infant feeding difficulties. To date 15 individuals, ages 24 months to 34 years, have been reported. Developmental delay is present in all individuals and ranges from mild to severe. All individuals have delayed speech. Although some begin to develop speech in the second year, others have remained nonverbal. Seizures, present in all affected individuals reported to date, can be febrile or non-febrile (tonic-clonic, absence, rolandic seizures); most seizures are self limited or respond well to standard treatment. Affected individuals are generally described as happy and socially engaging; several have stereotypies / autistic features (repetitive or rocking behavior, abnormal hand movements or posturing, and at times self-stimulation).
Mitochondrial myopathy-cerebellar ataxia-pigmentary retinopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1620960
Concept ID:
C4540096
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial myopathy and ataxia (MMYAT) is an autosomal recessive mtDNA depletion disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, congenital muscle involvement with histologic findings ranging from myopathic to dystrophic, and pigmentary retinopathy (summary by Donkervoort et al., 2019).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 9
MedGen UID:
1617571
Concept ID:
C4540265
Disease or Syndrome
HMND9 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by juvenile onset of slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting both the lower and upper limbs (summary by Tsai et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant distal HMN, see HMND1 (182960).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 61
MedGen UID:
1622296
Concept ID:
C4540424
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
MRT61 is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and variable dysmorphic facial features. More severely affected patients may develop refractory seizures and have brain abnormalities, including hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (summary by Alwadei et al., 2016).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with ataxic gait, absent speech, and decreased cortical white matter
MedGen UID:
1621102
Concept ID:
C4540498
Disease or Syndrome
NDAGSCW is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have delayed and difficulty walking, intellectual disability, absent speech, and variable additional features, including hip dysplasia, tapering fingers, and seizures. Brain imaging shows decreased cortical white matter, often with decreased cerebellar white matter, thin corpus callosum, and thin brainstem (summary by Lamers et al., 2017).
Perrault syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1640257
Concept ID:
C4551721
Disease or Syndrome
Perrault syndrome is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in males and females and ovarian dysfunction in females. SNHL is bilateral and ranges from profound with prelingual (congenital) onset to moderate with early-childhood onset. When onset is in early childhood, hearing loss can be progressive. Ovarian dysfunction ranges from gonadal dysgenesis (absent or streak gonads) manifesting as primary amenorrhea to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) defined as cessation of menses before age 40 years. Fertility in affected males is reported as normal (although the number of reported males is limited). Neurologic features described in some individuals with Perrault syndrome include learning difficulties and developmental delay, cerebellar ataxia, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy.
Galloway-Mowat syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1634188
Concept ID:
C4551772
Disease or Syndrome
MYH7-related skeletal myopathy
MedGen UID:
1647391
Concept ID:
C4552004
Disease or Syndrome
Laing distal myopathy is characterized by early-onset weakness (usually before age 5 years) that initially involves the dorsiflexors of the ankles and great toes and then the finger extensors, especially those of the third and fourth fingers. Weakness of the neck flexors is seen in most affected individuals and mild facial weakness is often present. After distal weakness has been present for more than ten years, mild proximal weakness may be observed. Life expectancy is normal.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, dominant intermediate G
MedGen UID:
1642893
Concept ID:
C4693509
Disease or Syndrome
CMTDIG is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most affected individuals have onset in the first or second decades of slowly progressive distal motor weakness and atrophy, resulting in gait instability and distal upper limb impairment, as well as distal sensory impairment. More severely affected individuals may have pes cavus and claw hands and become wheelchair-bound, whereas other affected individuals have later onset with a milder disease course. Electrophysiologic studies tend to show median motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) in the 'intermediate' range, between 25 and 45 m/s (summary by Berciano et al., 2017). In a review of intermediate CMT, Berciano et al. (2017) noted that advanced axonal degeneration may induce secondary demyelinating changes resulting in decreased NCV and attenuated compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in median nerve conduction studies. They thus suggested that testing the upper arm, axilla to elbow, may provide more accurate assessment of NCV and CMAP and reveal an intermediate phenotype (review by Berciano et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMTDI, see 606482.
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 7
MedGen UID:
1647672
Concept ID:
C4693583
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation-7 (NBIA7) is characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia and manifests as a progressive extrapyramidal syndrome with dystonia, rigidity, and choreoathetosis. Severity and rate of progression are variable (Drecourt et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of NBIA, see NBIA1 (234200).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A2
MedGen UID:
1648317
Concept ID:
C4721887
Disease or Syndrome
MFN2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (MFN2-HMSN) is a classic axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, inherited in either an autosomal dominant (AD) manner (~90%) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner (~10%). MFN2-HMSN is characterized by more severe involvement of the lower extremities than the upper extremities, distal upper-extremity involvement as the neuropathy progresses, more prominent motor deficits than sensory deficits, and normal (>42 m/s) or only slightly decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCVs). Postural tremor is common. Median onset is age 12 years in the AD form and age eight years in the AR form. The prevalence of optic atrophy is approximately 7% in the AD form and approximately 20% in the AR form.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 5
MedGen UID:
1648461
Concept ID:
C4721916
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) are a heterogeneous group of peripheral nervous system disorders affecting motor and sensory function. HMSN I, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, or peroneal muscular atrophy, type 1, is a demyelinating neuropathy (see CMT1B; 118200) and HMSN II, also known as CMT type 2, is an axonal neuropathy (see CMT2A1; 118210). See also HMSN III (145900) and HMSN IV (266500). For an autosomal recessive disorder with similarities to HMSN V, see 607731.
Autosomal dominant childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy with contractures
MedGen UID:
1669929
Concept ID:
C4747715
Disease or Syndrome
SMALED2A is an autosomal dominant form of spinal muscular atrophy characterized by early childhood onset of muscle weakness and atrophy predominantly affecting the proximal and distal muscles of the lower extremity, although some patients may show upper extremity involvement. The disorder results in delayed walking, waddling gait, difficulty walking, and loss of distal reflexes. Some patients may have foot deformities or hyperlordosis, and some show mild upper motor signs, such as spasticity. Sensation, bulbar function, and cognitive function are preserved. The disorder shows very slow progression throughout life (summary by Oates et al., 2013). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lower extremity-predominant spinal muscular atrophy, see SMALED1 (158600).
Charcot-marie-tooth disease, axonal, type 2DD
MedGen UID:
1648475
Concept ID:
C4747974
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2DD is an autosomal dominant peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy mainly affecting the lower limbs. Affected individuals have gait impairment due to distal muscle weakness and atrophy. Some patients may also have involvement of the distal upper limbs, resulting in atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles. The age at onset and severity of the disorder is highly variable, even within families, and those with earlier onset in late childhood or the teenage years tend to have a more severe disease course. Patients remain ambulatory even late in the disease, although some may require orthotic devices (summary by Lassuthova et al., 2018). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Peripheral neuropathy, autosomal recessive, with or without impaired intellectual development
MedGen UID:
1648480
Concept ID:
C4748283
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive peripheral neuropathy with or without impaired intellectual development is an early childhood-onset neurologic disorder characterized by slowly progressive distal motor impairment resulting in gait difficulties, often with loss of ambulation, and difficulties using the hands in most patients. Most affected individuals also have impaired intellectual development, although some have normal cognition. Electrophysiologic testing and sural nerve biopsy are most compatible with an axonal motor neuropathy; some patients may show signs of demyelination. Additional features may include eye movement abnormalities, claw hands, foot deformities, and scoliosis (summary by Ylikallio et al., 2017).
Neurodegeneration, childhood-onset, stress-induced, with variable ataxia and seizures
MedGen UID:
1648391
Concept ID:
C4748527
Disease or Syndrome
Stress-induced childhood-onset neurodegeneration with variable ataxia and seizures (CONDSIAS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with onset in the first years of life following normal early development. Patient have cyclic episodic deterioration in response to stress, such as infection or febrile illness. The severity is highly variable: some patients develop seizures early in life that are associated with loss of developmental milestones and early sudden death in childhood, whereas others present at a later age with muscle weakness, gait ataxia, impaired speech, more subtle clinical deterioration, and cognitive decline. Neurologic involvement includes gait ataxia, cerebellar signs associated with cerebellar atrophy, generalized brain atrophy, impaired intellectual development, hearing loss, and peripheral neuropathy (summary by Ghosh et al., 2018).
Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, 23, presynaptic
MedGen UID:
1648392
Concept ID:
C4748678
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, demyelinating, type 1G
MedGen UID:
1648290
Concept ID:
C4748940
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1G is an autosomal dominant progressive peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy with onset in the first or second decade. Affected individuals have difficulty walking, distal sensory impairment with decreased or absent reflexes, and often have foot deformities. Median motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) are decreased (less than 38 m/s) and sural nerve biopsy shows myelin defects and onion bulb formation (summary by Hong et al., 2016 and Motley et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease dominant intermediate F
MedGen UID:
1666273
Concept ID:
C4749463
Disease or Syndrome
CMTDIF is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset around adolescence of slowly progressive distal muscle atrophy and weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs and resulting in steppage gait. There is distal sensory impairment with decreased reflexes. Nerve conduction velocities are variable, ranging from the demyelinating to the axonal range (summary by Soong et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMTDI, see 606482.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal recessive 5
MedGen UID:
1667915
Concept ID:
C4749918
Disease or Syndrome
HMNR5 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by young adult onset of slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy resulting in gait impairment and loss of reflexes due to impaired function of motor nerves. Sensation and cognition are not impaired (summary by Blumen et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive HMN, see HMNR1 (604320).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy 1
MedGen UID:
1683470
Concept ID:
C4759870
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy type 1 (SCAN1) is characterized by late-childhood-onset slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and distal sensorimotor axonal neuropathy. Gaze nystagmus and dysarthria usually develop after the onset of ataxic gait. As the disease advances, pain and touch sensation in the hands and feet become impaired; vibration sense is lost in hands and lower thighs. Individuals with advanced disease develop a steppage gait and pes cavus and eventually become wheelchair dependent. Cognitive dysfunction – present in some – manifests as mild intellectual disability and poor executive function. To date only seven affected individuals have been described from three apparently unrelated consanguineous families (one from Saudi Arabia and two from Oman); therefore, it is likely that the full phenotypic spectrum of this disorder is not yet known.
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 6
MedGen UID:
1681379
Concept ID:
C5190805
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy-6 (EPM6) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of ataxia in the first years of life, followed by action myoclonus and seizures later in childhood, and loss of independent ambulation in the second decade. Cognition is not usually affected, although mild memory difficulties may occur in the third decade (summary by Corbett et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Turnpenny-fry syndrome
MedGen UID:
1683283
Concept ID:
C5193060
Disease or Syndrome
Turnpenny-Fry syndrome (TPFS) is characterized by developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, impaired growth, and recognizable facial features that include frontal bossing, sparse hair, malar hypoplasia, small palpebral fissures and oral stoma, and dysplastic 'satyr' ears. Other common findings include feeding problems, constipation, and a range of brain, cardiac, vascular, and skeletal malformations (Turnpenny et al., 2018).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy 3
MedGen UID:
1673607
Concept ID:
C5193070
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-3 (SCAN3) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset in the first decade of slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy and distal sensory impairment due to an axonal peripheral neuropathy. Affected individuals have gait disturbances and sometimes manual dexterity difficulties, as well as cerebellar ataxia associated with cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. Additional features usually include dysarthria, hyporeflexia, and increased serum creatine kinase. Some patients may have impaired intellectual development (summary by Higuchi et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of SCAN, see SCAN1 (607250).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, type 2EE
MedGen UID:
1677426
Concept ID:
C5193076
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2EE (CMT2EE) is an autosomal recessive sensorimotor peripheral axonal neuropathy with onset in the first or second decades of life. The disorder primarily affects the lower limbs and is slowly progressive, sometimes resulting in loss of ambulation, with later onset of upper limb involvement. There is significant distal muscle weakness and atrophy, usually with foot or hand deformities. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows findings of disturbed mitochondrial maintenance. Cognition is unaffected, and chronic liver disease is absent (summary by Baumann et al., 2019). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Spastic paraplegia 80, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1682111
Concept ID:
C5193084
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-80 (SPG80) is an autosomal dominant juvenile-onset neurologic disorder characterized by onset of progressive spasticity and hyperreflexia affecting mainly the lower limbs and resulting in difficulty walking or loss of independent ambulation, sometimes as early as the second decade. Some patients may have cerebellar signs and mild cognitive impairment, but most have a pure form of the disorder (summary by Farazi Fard et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600).
Spastic ataxia 9, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1680026
Concept ID:
C5193100
Disease or Syndrome
Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, type VIc, with optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
1680245
Concept ID:
C5193137
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type VIC with optic atrophy (HMSN6C) is an autosomal recessive axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy primarily affecting the lower limbs. Onset of neuropathy is in the first decade, manifest by difficulty walking and running and followed by similar involvement of the upper limbs and hands. The disorder is associated with distal sensory impairment, particularly of position and vibration sense, as well as areflexia; individuals usually have pes cavus, hammertoes, and atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles. In addition, progressive optic atrophy and visual impairment occur during adulthood. Treatment with pyridoxal 5-prime phosphate supplementation (vitamin B6) may result in amelioration of symptoms and slow progression of the disease (summary by Chelban et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HMSN6, see HMSN6A (601152).
Mitochondrial myopathy, episodic, with optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy
MedGen UID:
1679560
Concept ID:
C5193223
Disease or Syndrome
Episodic mitochondrial myopathy with or without optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy (MEOAL) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized mainly by childhood onset of progressive muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. Patients have episodic exacerbation, which may be associated with increased serum creatine kinase or lactic acid. Additional more variable features may include optic atrophy, reversible leukoencephalopathy, and later onset of a sensorimotor polyneuropathy. The disorder results from impaired formation of Fe-S clusters, which are essential cofactors for proper mitochondrial function (summary by Gurgel-Giannetti et al., 2018)
Siddiqi syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684813
Concept ID:
C5231435
Disease or Syndrome
Siddiqi syndrome (SIDDIS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, early-onset progressive sensorineural hearing impairment, regression of motor skills, dystonia, poor overall growth, and low body mass index (BMI). More variable features may include ichthyosis-like skin abnormalities or sensory neuropathy (summary by Zazo Seco et al., 2017).
Neuropathy, hereditary sensory and autonomic, type 1A
MedGen UID:
1716450
Concept ID:
C5235211
Disease or Syndrome
SPTLC1-related hereditary sensory neuropathy (HSN) is an axonal form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy distinguished by prominent early sensory loss and later positive sensory phenomena including dysesthesia and characteristic "lightning" or "shooting" pains. Loss of sensation can lead to painless injuries, which, if unrecognized, result in slow wound healing and subsequent osteomyelitis requiring distal amputations. Motor involvement is present in all advanced cases and can be severe. After age 20 years, the distal wasting and weakness may involve proximal muscles, possibly leading to wheelchair dependency by the seventh or eighth decade. Sensorineural hearing loss is variable.
Microcephaly, developmental delay, and brittle hair syndrome
MedGen UID:
1718781
Concept ID:
C5394425
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, developmental delay, and brittle hair syndrome (MDBH) is a multisystem disorder with clinical variability. Affected individuals show cognitive and motor disabilities, as well as some degree of fine, brittle hair with microscopic shaft abnormalities. Other shared features include failure to thrive in early childhood and short stature, with some patients exhibiting feeding difficulties and hepatic steatosis (Kuo et al., 2019).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal recessive 8
MedGen UID:
1714781
Concept ID:
C5394466
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-8 (HMNR8), or sorbitol dehydrogenase deficiency with peripheral neuropathy (SORDD), is characterized by onset of distal muscle weakness mainly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in difficulty walking. Onset of symptoms is usually in the first or second decades of life, although later adult onset has been reported; the disorder is slowly progressive. Nerve conduction velocities are most consistent with an axonal process. More variable features include distal sensory impairment, upper limb tremor, and scoliosis. Laboratory studies show increased serum sorbitol (summary by Cortese et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive HMN, see HMNR1 (604320).
Periventricular nodular heterotopia 9
MedGen UID:
1718470
Concept ID:
C5394503
Disease or Syndrome
Periventricular nodular heterotopia-9 (PVNH9) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized as a malformation of cortical development. Anterior predominant PVNH, thin corpus callosum, and decreased white matter volume are found on brain imaging, but the clinical effects are variable. Most patients have impaired intellectual development and cognitive defects associated with low IQ (range 50 to 80), learning disabilities, and behavior abnormalities. Some patients develop seizures that tend to have a focal origin. However, some mutation carriers may be less severely affected with borderline or even normal IQ, suggesting incomplete penetrance of the phenotype (summary by Heinzen et al., 2018, Walters et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of periventricular nodular heterotopia, see 300049.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 5A
MedGen UID:
1723540
Concept ID:
C5399969
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of GARS1-associated axonal neuropathy ranges from GARS1 infantile-onset SMA (GARS1-iSMA) to GARS1 adolescent- or early adult-onset hereditary motor/sensory neuropathy (GARS1-HMSN). GARS1-iSMA. Age of onset ranges from the neonatal period to the toddler years. Initial manifestations are typically respiratory distress, poor feeding, and muscle weakness (distal greater than proximal). Weakness is slowly progressive, ultimately requiring mechanical ventilation and feeding via gastrostomy tube. GARS1-HMSN. Age of onset is most commonly during the second decade (range eight to 36 years). Initial manifestations are typically muscle weakness in the hands sometimes with sensory deficits. Lower limb involvement (seen in ~50% of individuals) ranges from weakness and atrophy of the extensor digitorum brevis and weakness of toe dorsiflexors to classic peroneal muscular atrophy with foot drop and a high steppage gait.
Chromosome 17q11.2 deletion syndrome, 1.4Mb
MedGen UID:
1726802
Concept ID:
C5401456
Disease or Syndrome
Approximately 5 to 20% of all patients with neurofibromatosis type I (162200) carry a heterozygous deletion of approximately 1.4 Mb involving the NF1 gene and contiguous genes lying in its flanking regions (Riva et al., 2000; Jenne et al., 2001), which is caused by nonallelic homologous recombination of NF1 repeats A and C (Dorschner et al., 2000). The 'NF1 microdeletion syndrome' is often characterized by a more severe phenotype than that observed in the majority of NF1 patients. In particular, patients with NF1 microdeletion often show variable facial dysmorphism, mental retardation, developmental delay, an excessive number of early-onset neurofibromas (Venturin et al., 2004), and an increased risk for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (De Raedt et al., 2003).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, mitochondrial form, 1
MedGen UID:
1731194
Concept ID:
C5435765
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-1 (CMTMA1) is inherited only through the maternal line. The disorder is characterized by onset of distal muscle weakness and atrophy mainly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in difficulty walking in the second decade of life, although both earlier and later onset can occur. Upper limb involvement often develops with time, and affected individuals have weakness and atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles. Other features may include distal sensory impairment, foot deformities, scoliosis, hypo- or hyperreflexia, spastic paraparesis, and neurogenic bladder. Electrophysiologic studies are compatible with an axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, and muscle and nerve biopsy show evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction with decreased activities of respiratory complexes, mtDNA deletions, and mitochondrial hyperplasia (summary by Fay et al., 2020).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, impaired language, epilepsy, and gait abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1764121
Concept ID:
C5436788
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, impaired language, epilepsy, and gait abnormalities (NEDMILEG) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent in infancy. Affected individuals have delayed walking with variable gait abnormalities, including ataxia and spasticity, impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech and language, and progressive microcephaly. Dysmorphic facial features may also be observed. Most patients have early-onset seizures; some may develop a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The clinical features suggest involvement of both the central and peripheral nervous systems (Manole et al., 2020).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 5C
MedGen UID:
1760720
Concept ID:
C5436838
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-13 (HMND13) is a neurologic disorder characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting both the upper and lower limbs, resulting in difficulty walking and poor fine hand motor skills. Some patients show spasticity and hyperreflexia, mainly of the lower limbs: these features overlap with those observed in Silver syndrome, an allelic disorder. In addition, some patients with BSCL2 mutations show features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 (CMT2) with distal sensory impairment. HMND13, Silver syndrome (SPG17), and features of axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy (CMT2) thus represent a phenotypic spectrum associated with heterozygous mutations in the BSCL2 gene. Individuals with the same mutation may manifest features consistent with any of those disorders; variability is even observed within the same family (summary by Van de Warrenburg et al., 2006; Luigetti et al., 2010; Choi et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal HMN, see HMND1 (182960).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal recessive 7
MedGen UID:
1786836
Concept ID:
C5543119
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-7 (HMNR7) is characterized by onset of lower leg weakness in the first decade. Affected individuals have difficulty climbing stairs and problems standing on the heels. Some patients have later onset well into the adult years. Most patients have foot deformities, and some may have leg muscle atrophy. The disorder is slowly progressive and often involves the upper limbs. Muscle biopsy and electrophysiologic studies are consistent with both a myopathic process and an axonal motor neuropathy. Sensory abnormalities are not typically present, and patients remain ambulatory. The phenotype shows phenotypic overlap with distal hereditary motor neuropathy, but can distinguished by the presence of myopathic features (summary by Deschauer et al., 2021 and Pagnamenta et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive HMN, see HMNR1 (604320).
Radio-Tartaglia syndrome
MedGen UID:
1778557
Concept ID:
C5543339
Disease or Syndrome
Radio-Tartaglia syndrome (RATARS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, speech delay, and variable behavioral abnormalities. Affected individuals show hypotonia, mild motor difficulties, and craniofacial dysmorphism. Brain imaging may show nonspecific defects; rare patients have seizures or pyramidal signs. A subset of individuals may have congenital heart defects, precocious puberty, and obesity in females. Some of the features are similar to those observed in patients with chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome (607872) (summary by Radio et al., 2021).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 31
MedGen UID:
1786855
Concept ID:
C5543627
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-31 (SCAR31) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with hypotonia and variably impaired intellectual and language development. Affected individuals have an ataxic gait, tremor, and dysarthria; more severely affected patients also have spasticity with inability to walk. Most have optic atrophy. Brain imaging shows cerebellar hypoplasia, enlarged ventricles, and atrophy of the posterior corpus callosum. Additional features may include retinitis pigmentosa, sensorineural deafness, dysmorphic facial features, and possibly endocrine dysfunction (summary by Collier et al., 2021).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease, axonal, type 2GG
MedGen UID:
1794143
Concept ID:
C5561933
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2GG (CMT2GG) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy primarily affecting the lower limbs and causing difficulty walking. The onset is usually in adulthood, although rare patients may have mild symptoms from childhood. Some individuals may also have involvement of the hands. Although most patients have hypo- or areflexia at the ankles, distal sensory impairment is not always present, indicating a spectrum of disease encompassing both distal hereditary neuropathy and axonal CMT. Electrophysiologic studies are consistent with a axonal process (summary by Mendoza-Ferreira et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, Type 2HH
MedGen UID:
1794213
Concept ID:
C5562003
Disease or Syndrome
Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2HH (CMT2HH) is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy characterized predominantly by onset of vocal cord weakness resulting in stridor in infancy or early childhood. The vocal cord paresis remains throughout life and may be severe enough to require tracheostomy. Additional features of the disorder usually include pes cavus and scoliosis. Some patients have mild distal muscle weakness and atrophy primarily affecting the lower limbs, although the upper limbs may also be involved, and distal sensory impairment, often with hyporeflexia (Sullivan et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Spastic paraplegia 84, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1794235
Concept ID:
C5562025
Disease or Syndrome
PI4KA-related disorder is a clinically variable disorder characterized primarily by neurologic dysfunction (limb spasticity, developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, ataxia, nystagmus), gastrointestinal manifestations (multiple intestinal atresia, inflammatory bowel disease), and combined immunodeficiency (leukopenia, variable immunoglobulin defects). Age of onset is typically antenatal or in early childhood; individuals can present with any combination of these features. Rare individuals present with later-onset hereditary spastic paraplegia. Brain MRI findings can include hypomyelinating leukodystrophy, cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy, thin or dysplastic corpus callosum, and/or perisylvian polymicrogyria.
Dystonia 33
MedGen UID:
1794264
Concept ID:
C5562054
Disease or Syndrome
Dystonia-33 (DYT33) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of focal or generalized dystonia in the first decades of life (from early childhood to adolescence). The disorder is slowly progressive and may result in ambulation difficulties, dysarthria, or dysphagia. There is variable expressivity even with a family, as well as incomplete penetrance of the phenotype. Most mutations are in the heterozygous state, but a homozygous mutation with autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported, indicating variable patterns of transmission of DYT33. Some patients may have a more complex neurologic disorder with motor delay, lower limb spasticity, mild developmental delay with cognitive impairments, and nonspecific brain imaging abnormalities. There may be an exacerbation of the symptoms coinciding with viral infection or stress. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may be therapeutic (summary by Kuipers et al., 2021).
Yoon-Bellen neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794276
Concept ID:
C5562066
Disease or Syndrome
Yoon-Bellen neurodevelopmental syndrome (YOBELN) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized mainly by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development. The manifestations and severity of the phenotype are highly variable. Additional neurologic features may include hypotonia, spasticity, ataxia, hearing loss, visual problems, seizures, and nonspecific anomalies on brain imaging (summary by Yap et al., 2021).
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia type 76
MedGen UID:
1798906
Concept ID:
C5567483
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-76 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by young-adult onset of slowly progressive spasticity of the lower limbs resulting in gait difficulties. Most affected individuals have upper limb involvement and additional features such as foot deformities and dysarthria. Cognition is unaffected (summary by Gan-Or et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see SPG5A (270800).
Autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2W
MedGen UID:
1798909
Concept ID:
C5567486
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2W is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by a peripheral neuropathy mainly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in gait difficulties and distal sensory impairment, although most patients also have upper limb involvement. The age at onset is highly variable, ranging from childhood to late adulthood (summary by Safka Brozkova et al., 2015). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia type 78
MedGen UID:
1799316
Concept ID:
C5567893
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia-78 is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized predominantly by spasticity and muscle weakness of the lower limbs, resulting in gait difficulties and loss of ambulation in some patients. Affected individuals also have cerebellar signs, such as dysarthria, oculomotor disturbances, and limb and gait ataxia; brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy. Some patients may have mild cognitive impairment or frank dementia. The phenotype is highly variable (summary by Estrada-Cuzcano et al., 2017). Biallelic mutation in the ATP13A2 gene also causes Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (KRS; 606693), a neurodegenerative disorder with overlapping features. Patients with KRS have earlier onset and prominent parkinsonism. Loss of ATP13A2 function results in a multidimensional spectrum of neurologic features reflecting various regions of the brain and nervous system, including cortical, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, brainstem, cerebellar, and peripheral (summary by Estrada-Cuzcano et al., 2017).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 9A
MedGen UID:
1800401
Concept ID:
C5568978
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia-9A is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive spasticity mainly affecting the lower limbs. The age at onset usually ranges from adolescence to adulthood, and patients have gait difficulties, motor neuropathy, and dysarthria. Additional variable features include cerebellar signs, cataract, pes cavus, and urinary urgency (summary by Coutelier et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2X
MedGen UID:
1800447
Concept ID:
C5569024
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2X (CMT2X) is an autosomal recessive, slowly progressive, axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy characterized by lower limb muscle weakness and atrophy associated with distal sensory impairment and gait difficulties. Some patients also have involvement of the upper limbs. Onset usually occurs in the first 2 decades of life, although later onset can also occur (summary by Montecchiani et al., 2016) For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2Z
MedGen UID:
1800448
Concept ID:
C5569025
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Z (CMT2Z) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset, usually in the first decade, of distal lower limb muscle weakness and sensory impairment. The disorder is progressive, and affected individuals tend to develop upper limb and proximal muscle involvement in an asymmetric pattern, resulting in severe disability late in adulthood. Rare occurrence of global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development or learning difficulties has been observed. In some instances, the same mutation may result in different phenotypic manifestations (CMT2Z or DIGFAN), which highlights the clinical spectrum associated with MORC2 mutations and may render the classification of patients into one or the other disorder challenging (summary by Sevilla et al., 2016, Ando et al., 2017, Guillen Sacoto et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Y
MedGen UID:
1800449
Concept ID:
C5569026
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Y is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy associated with length-dependent sensory loss. Most patients have involvement of both the lower and upper limbs. The age at onset and the severity of the disorder are highly variable (summary by Gonzalez et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease recessive intermediate D
MedGen UID:
1800450
Concept ID:
C5569027
Disease or Syndrome
A rare hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with characteristics of childhood onset of unsteady gait, pes cavus, frequent falls and foot dorsiflexor weakness slowly progressing to distal upper and lower limb muscle weakness and atrophy, distal sensory impairment and reduced tendon reflexes. Additional symptoms may include bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment and neuropathic pain.
Bryant-Li-Bhoj neurodevelopmental syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1811435
Concept ID:
C5676906
Disease or Syndrome
Bryant-Li-Bhoj neurodevelopmental syndrome-2 (BRYLIB2) is a highly variable phenotype characterized predominantly by moderate to severe global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, poor or absent speech, and delayed motor milestones. Most patients have hypotonia, although some have peripheral hypertonia. Common features include variable dysmorphic facial features, oculomotor abnormalities, feeding problems, and nonspecific brain imaging abnormalities. Additional features may include hearing loss, seizures, short stature, and mild skeletal defects (summary by Bryant et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bryant-Li-Bhoj neurodevelopmental syndrome, see BRYLIB1 (619720).
Spinocerebellar ataxia 49
MedGen UID:
1805601
Concept ID:
C5676950
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-49 (SCA49) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized initially by gait abnormalities, gaze-evoked nystagmus, and hyperreflexia. The age at onset is highly variable, ranging from the second to seventh decades, even within the same family. The disorder is slowly progressive, and later features may include dysarthria, dysmetria, diplopia, pyramidal signs, and axonal peripheral neuropathy. Brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy and myelination defects (Corral-Juan et al., 2022).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with neuromuscular and skeletal abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1803456
Concept ID:
C5676965
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with neuromuscular and skeletal abnormalities (NEDNMS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy or early childhood. The severity of the disorder is highly variable. Affected individuals show impaired intellectual development and motor delay associated with either severe hypotonia or hypertonia and spasticity. Most affected individuals have skeletal defects and dysmorphic facial features. Some may have ocular or auditory problems, peripheral neuropathy, behavioral abnormalities, and nonspecific findings on brain imaging (Kurolap et al., 2022).
Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1800921
Concept ID:
C5677012
Disease or Syndrome
Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome-2 (CFZS2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by weakness of the facial musculature, hypomimic facies, increased overbite, micrognathia, and facial dysmorphism. Other features may include failure to thrive, axial hypotonia, and progressive scoliosis (Ramirez-Martinez et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome, see CFZS1 (254940).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal dominant 10
MedGen UID:
1824007
Concept ID:
C5774234
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-10 (HMND10) is a neurologic disorder of the peripheral nerves characterized clinically by length-dependent motor neuropathy primarily affecting the lower limbs. Affected individuals have onset of distal muscle weakness and atrophy in early childhood that results in walking difficulties and gait abnormalities. Some have pyramidal signs, including hyperreflexia, suggesting the involvement of upper motor neurons. Electrophysiologic studies are consistent with a neurogenic process. More variable features may include mild intellectual disability, minor gyration defects on brain imaging, foot deformities, and connective tissue defects (1 family) (Capuano et al., 2016; Iacomino et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant distal HMN, see HMND1 (182960).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, demyelinating, type 1J
MedGen UID:
1824022
Concept ID:
C5774249
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1J (CMT1J) is an autosomal dominant sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy, as well as distal sensory impairment, predominantly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in gait abnormalities. The age at onset is highly variable, ranging from early childhood to mid-adulthood, and the disorder is progressive, although the severity is also variable. Additional features may include foot deformities, upper limb or hand involvement, and decreased or absent deep tendon reflexes. Electrophysiologic studies tend to show nerve conduction velocities in the demyelinating range, although some patients may have results in the intermediate range, likely reflecting secondary axonal degeneration (summary by Ronkko et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200).
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome 7 with inflammation and tumor predisposition
MedGen UID:
1824057
Concept ID:
C5774284
Disease or Syndrome
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome-7 with inflammation and tumor predisposition (MVA7) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to benign and malignant neoplasms beginning in early childhood. Affected individuals show dysmorphic facies and may have early developmental delay. Patient cells show a high level of aneuploidy due to defects in cell division (Villarroya-Beltri et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MVA, see MVA1 (257300).
Congenital myopathy 4B, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1840525
Concept ID:
C5829889
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-4B (CMYP4B) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by the onset of muscle weakness in infancy or early childhood. The severity and pattern of muscle weakness varies, but most affected individuals show congenital contractures, delayed motor development, hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, and weakness of the proximal limb muscles and neck muscles, resulting in difficulty walking or inability to walk. Affected individuals have respiratory insufficiency due to muscle weakness, which may be life-threatening. Other common features include myopathic facies, chest deformities, distal joint laxity, and scoliosis. Variable histologic findings on skeletal muscle biopsy are observed, including nemaline rods, type 1 fiber predomination, and centralized nuclei (Tan et al., 1999; Lehtokari et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 27, juvenile
MedGen UID:
1840995
Concept ID:
C5830359
Disease or Syndrome
Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-27 (ALS27) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by early childhood-onset lower extremity spasticity manifesting as toe walking and gait abnormalities, followed by progressive lower motor neuron-mediated weakness without sensory signs or symptoms (Mohassel et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, see ALS1 (105400).
Nemaline myopathy 5C, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1841185
Concept ID:
C5830549
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant nemaline myopathy-5C (NEM5C) is a relatively mild skeletal muscle disorder with wide clinical variability, even within families. Affected individuals develop symptoms of muscle weakness in the first or second decades; those with earlier onset tend to have a more severe disease course. Features include difficulty walking on the heels, waddling gait, proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs, and Gowers sign. Additional features may include myopathic facies, high-arched palate, scoliosis or kyphosis, and ankle weakness. Patients remain ambulatory into late adulthood. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows hypotrophy of type 1 fibers, hypertrophy of type 2 fibers, fiber size variation, and myofibrillar disorganization. Nemaline rods in type 1 fibers are often observed, but are not always present (Konersman et al., 2017; Holling et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM2 (256030).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Grady JF, Schumann J, Cormier C, LaViolette K, Chinn A
Clin Podiatr Med Surg 2021 Jul;38(3):391-410. doi: 10.1016/j.cpm.2021.02.004. PMID: 34053651
Winfeld MJ, Winfeld BE
Pediatr Radiol 2019 Nov;49(12):1678-1690. Epub 2019 Nov 4 doi: 10.1007/s00247-019-04503-4. PMID: 31686173
Mary P, Servais L, Vialle R
Orthop Traumatol Surg Res 2018 Feb;104(1S):S89-S95. Epub 2017 Nov 28 doi: 10.1016/j.otsr.2017.04.019. PMID: 29196274

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Brilhault J
Orthop Traumatol Surg Res 2022 Feb;108(1S):103121. Epub 2021 Oct 20 doi: 10.1016/j.otsr.2021.103121. PMID: 34687951
Buldt AK, Forghany S, Landorf KB, Levinger P, Murley GS, Menz HB
Gait Posture 2018 May;62:235-240. Epub 2018 Mar 5 doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2018.03.005. PMID: 29573666
Longo UG, Ronga M, Maffulli N
Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Mar;26(1):16-30. doi: 10.1097/JSA.0000000000000185. PMID: 29300224
Burns J, Landorf KB, Ryan MM, Crosbie J, Ouvrier RA
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007 Oct 17;2007(4):CD006154. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD006154.pub2. PMID: 17943889Free PMC Article
Statler TK, Tullis BL
J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 2005 Jan-Feb;95(1):42-52. doi: 10.7547/0950042. PMID: 15659413

Diagnosis

Vezyroglou A, Akilapa R, Barwick K, Koene S, Brownstein CA, Holder-Espinasse M, Fry AE, Németh AH, Tofaris GK, Hay E, Hughes I, Mansour S, Mordekar SR, Splitt M, Turnpenny PD, Demetriou D, Koopmann TT, Ruivenkamp CAL, Agrawal PB, Carr L, Clowes V, Ghali N, Holder SE, Radley J, Male A, Sisodiya SM, Kurian MA, Cross JH, Balasubramanian M
Neurology 2022 Oct 4;99(14):e1511-e1526. Epub 2022 Jul 18 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000200927. PMID: 36192182Free PMC Article
Grady JF, Schumann J, Cormier C, LaViolette K, Chinn A
Clin Podiatr Med Surg 2021 Jul;38(3):391-410. doi: 10.1016/j.cpm.2021.02.004. PMID: 34053651
Longo UG, Ronga M, Maffulli N
Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Mar;26(1):16-30. doi: 10.1097/JSA.0000000000000185. PMID: 29300224
Mary P, Servais L, Vialle R
Orthop Traumatol Surg Res 2018 Feb;104(1S):S89-S95. Epub 2017 Nov 28 doi: 10.1016/j.otsr.2017.04.019. PMID: 29196274
Longo UG, Ronga M, Maffulli N
Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2009 Jun;17(2):112-26. doi: 10.1097/JSA.0b013e3181a3d625. PMID: 19440139

Therapy

Lynch DR, Farmer J, Hauser L, Blair IA, Wang QQ, Mesaros C, Snyder N, Boesch S, Chin M, Delatycki MB, Giunti P, Goldsberry A, Hoyle C, McBride MG, Nachbauer W, O'Grady M, Perlman S, Subramony SH, Wilmot GR, Zesiewicz T, Meyer C
Ann Clin Transl Neurol 2019 Jan;6(1):15-26. Epub 2018 Nov 10 doi: 10.1002/acn3.660. PMID: 30656180Free PMC Article
Guyton GP
Foot Ankle Clin 2016 Sep;21(3):551-66. doi: 10.1016/j.fcl.2016.04.007. PMID: 27524705
Lee K, Cho JH, Lee WC
Foot Ankle Clin 2013 Dec;18(4):743-53. doi: 10.1016/j.fcl.2013.08.011. PMID: 24215837
Khan MN, Jacobs BC, Ashbaugh S
Prim Care 2013 Dec;40(4):1001-12, x. Epub 2013 Oct 15 doi: 10.1016/j.pop.2013.08.013. PMID: 24209730
Burns J, Landorf KB, Ryan MM, Crosbie J, Ouvrier RA
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007 Oct 17;2007(4):CD006154. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD006154.pub2. PMID: 17943889Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Huang D, Song X, Ma J, Li X, Guo Y, Li M, Luo H, Fang Z, Yang C, Xie L, Jiang L
Eur J Pediatr 2023 Feb;182(2):825-836. Epub 2022 Dec 9 doi: 10.1007/s00431-022-04744-w. PMID: 36484864
Pavone P, Pappalardo XG, Ruggieri M, Falsaperla R, Parano E
Medicine (Baltimore) 2022 Aug 5;101(31):e29413. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000029413. PMID: 35945798Free PMC Article
Jacobs AM
Clin Podiatr Med Surg 2021 Jul;38(3):291-302. Epub 2021 May 15 doi: 10.1016/j.cpm.2020.12.012. PMID: 34053645
Mary P, Servais L, Vialle R
Orthop Traumatol Surg Res 2018 Feb;104(1S):S89-S95. Epub 2017 Nov 28 doi: 10.1016/j.otsr.2017.04.019. PMID: 29196274
Harris E
Clin Podiatr Med Surg 2013 Oct;30(4):531-65. Epub 2013 Jul 31 doi: 10.1016/j.cpm.2013.07.002. PMID: 24075135

Clinical prediction guides

Vezyroglou A, Akilapa R, Barwick K, Koene S, Brownstein CA, Holder-Espinasse M, Fry AE, Németh AH, Tofaris GK, Hay E, Hughes I, Mansour S, Mordekar SR, Splitt M, Turnpenny PD, Demetriou D, Koopmann TT, Ruivenkamp CAL, Agrawal PB, Carr L, Clowes V, Ghali N, Holder SE, Radley J, Male A, Sisodiya SM, Kurian MA, Cross JH, Balasubramanian M
Neurology 2022 Oct 4;99(14):e1511-e1526. Epub 2022 Jul 18 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000200927. PMID: 36192182Free PMC Article
Grady JF, Schumann J, Cormier C, LaViolette K, Chinn A
Clin Podiatr Med Surg 2021 Jul;38(3):391-410. doi: 10.1016/j.cpm.2021.02.004. PMID: 34053651
Jacobs AM
Clin Podiatr Med Surg 2021 Jul;38(3):291-302. Epub 2021 May 15 doi: 10.1016/j.cpm.2020.12.012. PMID: 34053645
Lynch DR, Farmer J, Hauser L, Blair IA, Wang QQ, Mesaros C, Snyder N, Boesch S, Chin M, Delatycki MB, Giunti P, Goldsberry A, Hoyle C, McBride MG, Nachbauer W, O'Grady M, Perlman S, Subramony SH, Wilmot GR, Zesiewicz T, Meyer C
Ann Clin Transl Neurol 2019 Jan;6(1):15-26. Epub 2018 Nov 10 doi: 10.1002/acn3.660. PMID: 30656180Free PMC Article
Koca TT, Göğebakan H, Koçyiğit BF, Nacitarhan V, Yildir CZ
Clin Rheumatol 2019 Apr;38(4):1083-1088. Epub 2018 Dec 3 doi: 10.1007/s10067-018-4386-6. PMID: 30511294

Recent systematic reviews

Coll MC, Beech MI
Foot (Edinb) 2023 May;55:101982. Epub 2023 Mar 1 doi: 10.1016/j.foot.2023.101982. PMID: 36870145
Riegger M, Müller J, Giampietro A, Saporito A, Filardo G, Treglia G, Guidi M, Candrian C
J Foot Ankle Surg 2022 May-Jun;61(3):641-647. Epub 2021 Nov 16 doi: 10.1053/j.jfas.2021.11.002. PMID: 35039196
Kearney M, Orrell RW, Fahey M, Brassington R, Pandolfo M
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016 Aug 30;2016(8):CD007791. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD007791.pub4. PMID: 27572719Free PMC Article
Hawke F, Burns J, Radford JA, du Toit V
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2008 Jul 16;(3):CD006801. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD006801.pub2. PMID: 18646168
Burns J, Landorf KB, Ryan MM, Crosbie J, Ouvrier RA
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007 Oct 17;2007(4):CD006154. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD006154.pub2. PMID: 17943889Free PMC Article

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