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Bilateral tonic-clonic seizure

MedGen UID:
141670
Concept ID:
C0494475
Sign or Symptom
Synonym: Generalized tonic-clonic seizures
SNOMED CT: Tonic-clonic seizure (1217136003); Tonic-clonic epileptic seizure (1217136003)
 
HPO: HP:0002069

Definition

A bilateral tonic-clonic seizure is a seizure defined by a tonic (bilateral increased tone, lasting seconds to minutes) and then a clonic (bilateral sustained rhythmic jerking) phase. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Hallermann-Streiff syndrome
MedGen UID:
5414
Concept ID:
C0018522
Disease or Syndrome
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome is characterized by a typical skull shape (brachycephaly with frontal bossing), hypotrichosis, microphthalmia, cataracts, beaked nose, micrognathia, skin atrophy, dental anomalies, and proportionate short stature (Hallermann, 1948; Streiff, 1950; Francois, 1958). Mental retardation is present in a minority of cases (Gorlin et al., 1990).
Pelger-Huët anomaly
MedGen UID:
10617
Concept ID:
C0030779
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant inherited condition caused by mutations in the lamin B receptor gene. It is characterized by defects in the neutrophil lobulation, resulting in the presence of dumbbell-shaped neutrophils with bilobed nuclei in the peripheral blood smear.
Sandhoff disease
MedGen UID:
11313
Concept ID:
C0036161
Disease or Syndrome
Sandhoff disease comprises a phenotypic continuum encompassing acute infantile, subacute juvenile, and late-onset disease. Although classification into these phenotypes is somewhat arbitrary, it is helpful in understanding the variation observed in the timing of disease onset, presenting manifestations, rate of progression, and life span. Acute infantile Sandhoff disease (onset age <6 months). Infants are generally normal at birth followed by progressive weakness and slowing of developmental progress, then developmental regression and severe neurologic impairment. Seizures are common. Death usually occurs between ages two and three years. Subacute juvenile Sandhoff disease (onset age 2-5 years). After attaining normal developmental milestones, developmental progress slows, followed by developmental regression and neurologic impairment (abnormal gait, dysarthria, and cognitive decline). Death (usually from aspiration) typically occurs in the early to late teens. Late-onset Sandhoff disease (onset older teen years or young adulthood). Nearly normal psychomotor development is followed by a range of neurologic findings (e.g., weakness, spasticity, dysarthria, and deficits in cerebellar function) and psychiatric findings (e.g., deficits in executive function and memory). Life expectancy is not necessarily decreased.
Juvenile myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis AND stroke
MedGen UID:
56485
Concept ID:
C0162671
Disease or Syndrome
MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) is a multisystem disorder with protean manifestations. The vast majority of affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of MELAS between ages two and 40 years. Common clinical manifestations include stroke-like episodes, encephalopathy with seizures and/or dementia, muscle weakness and exercise intolerance, normal early psychomotor development, recurrent headaches, recurrent vomiting, hearing impairment, peripheral neuropathy, learning disability, and short stature. During the stroke-like episodes neuroimaging shows increased T2-weighted signal areas that do not correspond to the classic vascular distribution (hence the term "stroke-like"). Lactic acidemia is very common and muscle biopsies typically show ragged red fibers.
Spongy degeneration of central nervous system
MedGen UID:
61565
Concept ID:
C0206307
Disease or Syndrome
Most individuals with Canavan disease have the neonatal/infantile form. Although such infants appear normal early in life, by age three to five months, hypotonia, head lag, macrocephaly, and developmental delays become apparent. With age, children with neonatal/infantile-onset Canavan disease often become irritable and experience sleep disturbance, seizures, and feeding difficulties. Swallowing deteriorates, and some children require nasogastric feeding or permanent feeding gastrostomies. Joint stiffness increases, so that these children resemble individuals with cerebral palsy. Children with mild/juvenile Canavan disease may have normal or mildly delayed speech or motor development early in life without regression. In spite of developmental delay most of these children can be educated in typical classroom settings and may benefit from speech therapy or tutoring as needed. Most children with mild forms of Canavan disease have normal head size, although macrocephaly, retinitis pigmentosa, and seizures have been reported in a few individuals.
DE SANCTIS-CACCHIONE SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
75550
Concept ID:
C0265201
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal recessive inherited syndrome. It is characterized by xeroderma pigmentosum, mental retardation, dwarfism, hypogonadism, and neurologic abnormalities.
Weaver syndrome
MedGen UID:
120511
Concept ID:
C0265210
Disease or Syndrome
EZH2-related overgrowth includes EZH2-related Weaver syndrome at one end of the spectrum and tall stature at the other. Although most individuals diagnosed with a heterozygous EZH2 pathogenic variant have been identified because of a clinical suspicion of Weaver syndrome, a minority have been identified through molecular genetic testing of family members of probands or individuals with overgrowth who did not have a clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome. Thus, the extent of the phenotypic spectrum associated with a heterozygous EZH2 pathogenic variant is not yet known. Weaver syndrome is characterized by tall stature, variable intellect (ranging from normal intellect to severe intellectual disability), characteristic facial appearance, and a range of associated clinical features including advanced bone age, poor coordination, soft doughy skin, camptodactyly of the fingers and/or toes, umbilical hernia, abnormal tone, and hoarse low cry in infancy. Brain MRI has identified abnormalities in a few individuals with EZH2-related overgrowth. Neuroblastoma occurs at a slightly increased frequency in individuals with a heterozygous EZH2 pathogenic variant but data are insufficient to determine absolute risk. There is currently no evidence that additional malignancies (including hematologic malignancies) occur with increased frequency.
Sulfite oxidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
78695
Concept ID:
C0268624
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency ranges from classic early-onset (severe) disease to late-onset (mild) disease. Classic ISOD is characterized in the first few hours to days of life by intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, and rapidly progressive encephalopathy manifest as abnormal tone (especially opisthotonus, spastic quadriplegia, and pyramidal signs) followed by progressive microcephaly and profound intellectual disability. Lens subluxation or dislocation, another characteristic finding, may be evident after the newborn period. Children usually die during the first few months of life. Late-onset ISOD manifests between ages six and 18 months and is characterized by ectopia lentis (variably present), developmental delay/regression, movement disorder characterized by dystonia and choreoathetosis, ataxia, and (rarely) acute hemiplegia as a result of metabolic stroke. The clinical course may be progressive or episodic. In the episodic form encephalopathy, dystonia, choreoathetosis, and/or ataxia are intermittent.
Succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
124340
Concept ID:
C0268631
Disease or Syndrome
Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency is characterized by infantile-onset hypotonia, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, expressive language deficit, and mild ataxia. Epilepsy is present in about half of affected individuals and is more common in adults. Hyperkinetic behavior, aggression, self-injurious behaviors, hallucinations, and sleep disturbances have been reported in nearly half of all affected individuals, more commonly in those who are older. Basal ganglia signs including choreoathetosis, dystonia, and myoclonus have been reported in a few individuals with earlier-onset, more severe disease. Involvement beyond the central nervous system has not been described. Individuals with SSADH deficiency typically have 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria present on urine organic acid analysis. Head MRI reveals T2 hyperintensities in multiple regions, involving the globus pallidi, cerebellar dentate nuclei, subthalamic nuclei, subcortical white matter, and brain stem, as well as cerebral and sometimes cerebellar atrophy. EEG findings include background slowing and spike discharges that are usually generalized.
Idiopathic generalized epilepsy
MedGen UID:
75725
Concept ID:
C0270850
Disease or Syndrome
Idiopathic generalized epilepsy is a broad term that encompasses several common seizure phenotypes, classically including childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, ECA; see 600131), juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE, EJA; see 607631), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME, EJM; see 254770), and epilepsy with grand mal seizures on awakening (Commission on Classification and Terminology of the International League Against Epilepsy, 1989). These recurrent seizures occur in the absence of detectable brain lesions and/or metabolic abnormalities. Seizures are initially generalized with a bilateral, synchronous, generalized, symmetrical EEG discharge (Zara et al., 1995; Lu and Wang, 2009). See also childhood absence epilepsy (ECA1; 600131), which has also been mapped to 8q24. Of note, benign neonatal epilepsy 2 (EBN2; 121201) is caused by mutation in the KCNQ3 gene (602232) on 8q24. Genetic Heterogeneity of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy EIG1 has been mapped to chromosome 8q24. Other loci or genes associated with EIG include EIG2 (606972) on 14q23; EIG3 (608762) on 9q32; EIG4 (609750) on 10q25; EIG5 (611934) on 10p11; EIG6 (611942), caused by mutation in the CACNA1H gene (607904) on 16p; EIG7 (604827) on 15q14; EIG8 (612899), caused by mutation in the CASR gene (601199) on 3q13.3-q21; EIG9 (607682), caused by mutation in the CACNB4 gene (601949) on 2q23; EIG10 (613060), caused by mutation in the GABRD gene (137163) on 1p36; EIG11 (607628), caused by variation in the CLCN2 gene (600570) on 3q36; EIG12 (614847), caused by mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (138140) on 1p34; EIG13 (611136), caused by mutation in the GABRA1 gene (137160) on 5q34; EIG14 (616685), caused by mutation in the SLC12A5 gene (606726) on 20q12; EIG15 (618357), caused by mutation in the RORB gene (601972) on 9q22; EIG16 (618596), caused by mutation in the KCNMA1 gene (600150) on chromosome 10q22; EIG17 (602477), caused by mutation in the HCN2 gene (602781) on chromosome 19p13.3; and EIG18 (619521) caused by mutation in the HCN4 gene (605206) on chromosome 15q24.
Landau-Kleffner syndrome
MedGen UID:
79465
Concept ID:
C0282512
Disease or Syndrome
GRIN2A-related speech disorders and epilepsy are characterized by speech disorders in all affected individuals and a range of epilepsy syndromes present in about 90%. Severe speech disorders observed can include dysarthria and speech dyspraxia, and both receptive and expressive language delay/regression; more mildly affected individuals may display subtly impaired intelligibility of conversational speech. Epilepsy features include seizure onset usually between ages three and six years, focal epilepsy with language and/or global developmental regression, and electroencephalogram (EEG) showing continuous spike-and-wave discharges in sleep or very active centrotemporal discharges. Seizure types include seizures associated with aura of perioral paresthesia, focal or focal motor seizures (often evolving to generalized tonic-clonic), and atypical absence seizures. Epilepsy syndromes can include: Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-wave during sleep (ECSWS), childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (CECTS), atypical childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (ACECTS), autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy with speech dyspraxia (ADRESD), and infantile-onset epileptic encephalopathy.
D-Glyceric aciduria
MedGen UID:
452447
Concept ID:
C0342765
Disease or Syndrome
D-glyceric aciduria is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Some patients have an encephalopathic presentation, with severe mental retardation, seizures, microcephaly, and sometimes early death, whereas others have a mild phenotype with only mild speech delay or even normal development (summary by Sass et al., 2010).
Bifunctional peroxisomal enzyme deficiency
MedGen UID:
137982
Concept ID:
C0342870
Pathologic Function
D-bifunctional protein deficiency is a disorder of peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation. See also peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency (264470), caused by mutation in the ACOX1 gene (609751) on chromosome 17q25. The clinical manifestations of these 2 deficiencies are similar to those of disorders of peroxisomal assembly, including X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD; 300100), Zellweger cerebrohepatorenal syndrome (see 214100) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD; see 601539) (Watkins et al., 1995). DBP deficiency has been classified into 3 subtypes depending upon the deficient enzyme activity. Type I is a deficiency of both 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase; type II is a deficiency of hydratase activity alone; and type III is a deficiency of dehydrogenase activity alone. Virtually all patients with types I, II, and III have a severe phenotype characterized by infantile-onset of hypotonia, seizures, and abnormal facial features, and most die before age 2 years. McMillan et al. (2012) proposed a type IV deficiency on the basis of less severe features; these patients have a phenotype reminiscent of Perrault syndrome (PRLTS1; 233400). Pierce et al. (2010) noted that Perrault syndrome and DBP deficiency overlap clinically and suggested that DBP deficiency may be underdiagnosed.
Amelocerebrohypohidrotic syndrome
MedGen UID:
98036
Concept ID:
C0406740
Disease or Syndrome
Kohlschutter-Tonz syndrome (KTZS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe global developmental delay, early-onset intractable seizures, spasticity, and amelogenesis imperfecta affecting both primary and secondary teeth and causing yellow or brown discoloration of the teeth. Although the phenotype is consistent, there is variability. Impaired intellectual development is related to the severity of seizures, and the disorder can thus be considered an epileptic encephalopathy. Some infants show normal development until seizure onset, whereas others are delayed from birth. The most severely affected individuals have profound mental retardation, never acquire speech, and become bedridden early in life (summary by Schossig et al., 2012 and Mory et al., 2012). See also Kohlschutter-Tonz syndrome-like (KTZSL; 619229), caused by heterozygous mutation in the SATB1 gene (602075) on chromosome 3p23.
Deficiency of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase
MedGen UID:
154356
Concept ID:
C0574080
Disease or Syndrome
The creatine deficiency disorders (CDDs), inborn errors of creatine metabolism and transport, comprise three disorders: the creatine biosynthesis disorders guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency and L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency; and creatine transporter (CRTR) deficiency. Developmental delay and cognitive dysfunction or intellectual disability and speech-language disorder are common to all three CDDs. Onset of clinical manifestations of GAMT deficiency (reported in ~130 individuals) is between ages three months and two years; in addition to developmental delays, the majority of individuals have epilepsy and develop a behavior disorder (e.g., hyperactivity, autism, or self-injurious behavior), and about 30% have movement disorder. AGAT deficiency has been reported in 16 individuals; none have had epilepsy or movement disorders. Clinical findings of CRTR deficiency in affected males (reported in ~130 individuals) in addition to developmental delays include epilepsy (variable seizure types and may be intractable) and behavior disorders (e.g., attention deficit and/or hyperactivity, autistic features, impulsivity, social anxiety), hypotonia, and (less commonly) a movement disorder. Poor weight gain with constipation and prolonged QTc on EKG have been reported. While mild-to-moderate intellectual disability is commonly observed up to age four years, the majority of adult males with CRTR deficiency have been reported to have severe intellectual disability. Females heterozygous for CRTR deficiency are typically either asymptomatic or have mild intellectual disability, although a more severe phenotype resembling the male phenotype has been reported.
Severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy
MedGen UID:
148243
Concept ID:
C0751122
Disease or Syndrome
SCN1A seizure disorders encompass a spectrum that ranges from simple febrile seizures and generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) at the mild end to Dravet syndrome and intractable childhood epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (ICE-GTC) at the severe end. Phenotypes with intractable seizures including Dravet syndrome are often associated with cognitive decline. Less commonly observed phenotypes include myoclonic astatic epilepsy (MAE), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, infantile spasms, epilepsy with focal seizures, and vaccine-related encephalopathy and seizures. The phenotype of SCN1A seizure disorders can vary even within the same family.
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 3
MedGen UID:
155549
Concept ID:
C0751383
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; CLN) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in different patterns ultrastructurally. The clinical course includes progressive dementia, seizures, and progressive visual failure (Mole et al., 2005). The hallmark of CLN3 is the ultrastructural pattern of lipopigment with a 'fingerprint' profile, which can have 3 different appearances: pure within a lysosomal residual body; in conjunction with curvilinear or rectilinear profiles; and as a small component within large membrane-bound lysosomal vacuoles. The combination of fingerprint profiles within lysosomal vacuoles is a regular feature of blood lymphocytes from patients with CLN3 (Mole et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CLN, see CLN1 (256730).
Unverricht-Lundborg syndrome
MedGen UID:
155923
Concept ID:
C0751785
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1(EPM1) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset from age six to 15 years, stimulus-sensitive myoclonus, and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. Some years after the onset, ataxia, incoordination, intentional tremor, and dysarthria develop. Individuals with EPM1 are cognitively mostly within the normal range, but show emotional lability and depression. The epileptic seizures are usually well controlled by anti-seizure medication, but the myoclonic jerks are progressive, action activated, and treatment resistant, and can be severely disabling.
Encephalopathy due to beta-mercaptolactate-cysteine disulfiduria
MedGen UID:
208661
Concept ID:
C0796055
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare disorder of methionine cycle and sulfur amino acid metabolism with characteristics of increased urine excretion of beta-mercaptolactate-cysteine disulfide (due to deficiency of mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase activity in erythrocytes), leading to a positive cyanide nitroprusside test. Association with intellectual disability, congenital lens dislocation, and behavioral abnormalities has been reported, however the causal link remains to be established. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1981.
Intellectual disability, X-linked 30
MedGen UID:
163235
Concept ID:
C0796237
Disease or Syndrome
Any non-syndromic X-linked intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PAK3 gene.
Familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy
MedGen UID:
181488
Concept ID:
C0917800
Disease or Syndrome
TBC1D24-related disorders comprise a continuum of features that were originally described as distinct, recognized phenotypes: DOORS syndrome (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures). Profound sensorineural hearing loss, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, intellectual disability / developmental delay, and seizures. Familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy (FIME). Early-onset myoclonic seizures, focal epilepsy, dysarthria, and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME). Action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, progressive neurologic decline, and ataxia. Early-infantile epileptic encephalopathy 16 (EIEE16). Epileptiform EEG abnormalities which themselves are believed to contribute to progressive disturbance in cerebral function. Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss, DFNB86. Profound prelingual deafness. Autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss, DFNA65. Slowly progressive deafness with onset in the third decade, initially affecting the high frequencies.
Epilepsy, familial adult myoclonic, 1
MedGen UID:
371424
Concept ID:
C1832841
Disease or Syndrome
Familial adult myoclonic epilepsy-1 (FAME1), also known as familial cortical myoclonic tremor associated with epilepsy-1 (FCMTE1), is characterized by autosomal dominant, adult-onset cortical myoclonus, with seizures in 40% of patients. Myoclonus is usually the first symptom and is characterized by tremulous finger movements and myoclonus of the extremities (summary by Depienne et al., 2010). FAME1 tends to occur in patients of southern Asian descent (summary by Bennett et al., 2020). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Adult Myoclonic Epilepsy See also FAME2 (607876), caused by mutation in the STARD7 gene (616712) on chromosome 2q11; FAME3 (613608), caused by mutation in the MARCHF6 gene (613297) on chromosome 5p15; FAME4 (615127), which maps to chromosome 3q26.32-q28; FAME5 (615400), caused by mutation in the CNTN2 gene (190197) on chromosome 1q32; FAME6 (618074), caused by mutation in the TNRC6A gene (610739) on chromosome 16p12; and FAME7 (618075), caused by mutation in the RAPGEF2 gene (609530) on chromosome 4. Progressive myoclonic epilepsy is a more severe disorder (see, e.g., EPM1, 254800).
Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, 4 (Kufs type)
MedGen UID:
320287
Concept ID:
C1834207
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-4 (CLN4) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of symptoms in adulthood. It belongs to a group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of intracellular autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in the brain and other tissues. Several different forms have been described according to age of onset (see, e.g., CLN3, 204200). Individuals with the adult form, sometimes referred to as Kufs disease, develop psychiatric manifestations, seizures, cerebellar ataxia, and cognitive decline. Retinal degeneration is usually not present (summary by Benitez et al., 2011 and Velinov et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CLN, see CLN1 (256730).
Aminoacylase 1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
324393
Concept ID:
C1835922
Disease or Syndrome
Aminoacylase-1 deficiency (ACY1D) is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism characterized by increased urinary excretion of specific N-actyl amino acids. Most patients show neurologic abnormalities such as intellectual disability, seizures, hypotonia, and motor delay (summary by Ferri et al., 2014).
Febrile seizures, familial, 5
MedGen UID:
322934
Concept ID:
C1836507
Disease or Syndrome
Febrile seizures, familial, 6
MedGen UID:
373107
Concept ID:
C1836518
Disease or Syndrome
GM3 synthase deficiency
MedGen UID:
323005
Concept ID:
C1836824
Disease or Syndrome
Salt and pepper developmental regression syndrome, also known as Amish infantile epilepsy syndrome, is an autosomal recessive neurocutaneous disorder characterized by infantile onset of refractory and recurrent seizures associated with profoundly delayed psychomotor development and/or developmental regression as well as abnormal movements and visual loss (summary by Fragaki et al., 2013). Affected individuals develop hypo- or hyperpigmented skin macules on the trunk, face, and extremities in early childhood (summary by Boccuto et al., 2014). Not all patients have overt seizures (Lee et al., 2016).
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 3
MedGen UID:
373335
Concept ID:
C1837468
Finding
Pachygyria-intellectual disability-epilepsy syndrome
MedGen UID:
333107
Concept ID:
C1838491
Disease or Syndrome
This autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder is characterized by pachygyria, impaired intellectual development, seizures, and diffuse localization of arachnoid cysts. It most likely represents a neuronal migration disorder within the lissencephaly spectrum (summary by Guzel et al., 2007).
Epilepsy, childhood absence, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
325057
Concept ID:
C1838604
Finding
Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, ECA), a subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (EIG; 600669), is characterized by a sudden and brief impairment of consciousness that is accompanied by a generalized, synchronous, bilateral, 2.5- to 4-Hz spike and slow-wave discharge (SWD) on EEG. Seizure onset occurs between 3 and 8 years of age and seizures generally occur multiple times per day. About 70% of patients experience spontaneous remission of seizures, often around adolescence. There are no structural neuropathologic findings in patients with ECA (Crunelli and Leresche, 2002). Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Childhood Absence Epilepsy The ECA1 locus has been mapped to chromosome 8q24; see also EIG1 (see 600669), which also maps to 8q24. Susceptibility to the development of childhood absence epilepsy may be conferred by variation in several genes: ECA2 (see 607681), conferred by variation in the GABRG2 gene (137164) on chromosome 5q31.1; ECA4 (611136), conferred by variation in the GABRA1 gene (137160) on chromosome 5q34; ECA5 (612269), conferred by variation in the GABRB3 gene (137192) on chromosome 15q12; and ECA6 (see 611942), conferred by variation in the CACNA1H gene (607904) on chromosome 16p13. See EIG11 (607628) for discussion of a locus previously designated ECA3 on chromosome 3q26.
Chondrodysplasia-pseudohermaphroditism syndrome
MedGen UID:
333149
Concept ID:
C1838654
Disease or Syndrome
Nivelon-Nivelon-Mabille syndrome (NNMS) is characterized by progressive microcephaly, vermis hypoplasia, and skeletal dysplasia. Variable features include infantile-onset seizures, dwarfism, generalized chondrodysplasia, and micromelia (Abdel-Salam et al., 2019).
Mitochondrial complex I deficiency
MedGen UID:
374101
Concept ID:
C1838979
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated complex I deficiency is a rare inborn error of metabolism due to mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial genes encoding subunits or assembly factors of the human mitochondrial complex I (NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase) and is characterized by a wide range of manifestations including marked and often fatal lactic acidosis, cardiomyopathy, leukoencephalopathy, pure myopathy and hepatopathy with tubulopathy. Among the numerous clinical phenotypes observed are Leigh syndrome, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and MELAS syndrome (see these terms).
Seizures, benign familial neonatal, 3
MedGen UID:
334063
Concept ID:
C1842382
Disease or Syndrome
Rolandic epilepsy-paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia-writer cramp syndrome
MedGen UID:
334104
Concept ID:
C1842531
Disease or Syndrome
Rolandic epilepsy with paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia and writer's cramp (EPRPDC) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of focal seizures in infancy and exercise-induced dystonia in childhood. Features usually include involuntary movements, including facial movements, and difficulties with fine motor skills of the hand. Seizures often respond to medication and remit with age; the dystonia tends to persist (summary by Luthy et al., 2019).
Epilepsy, familial adult myoclonic, 2
MedGen UID:
375031
Concept ID:
C1842852
Disease or Syndrome
Familial adult myoclonic epilepsy-2 (FAME2) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset of tremor affecting the fingers, hand, and voice in adolescence or young adulthood with somewhat later onset of rhythmic myoclonic jerks and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Electrophysiologic studies are consistent with cortical reflex myoclonus. Some patients may show cognitive decline or migraines; photosensitivity is common (summary by De Fusco et al., 2014; Crompton et al., 2012). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial adult myoclonic epilepsy, see FAME1 (601068).
Seizures, benign familial infantile, 3
MedGen UID:
375105
Concept ID:
C1843140
Disease or Syndrome
Benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures is an autosomal dominant disorder in which afebrile seizures occur in clusters during the first year of life, without neurologic sequelae (Shevell et al., 1986). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of benign familial infantile seizures, see BFIS1 (601764).
Alpha thalassemia-X-linked intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
337145
Concept ID:
C1845055
Disease or Syndrome
Alpha-thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability (ATR-X) syndrome is characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, genital anomalies, hypotonia, and mild-to-profound developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID). Craniofacial abnormalities include small head circumference, telecanthus or widely spaced eyes, short triangular nose, tented upper lip, and thick or everted lower lip with coarsening of the facial features over time. While all affected individuals have a normal 46,XY karyotype, genital anomalies comprise a range from hypospadias and undescended testicles, to severe hypospadias and ambiguous genitalia, to normal-appearing female external genitalia. Alpha-thalassemia, observed in about 75% of affected individuals, is mild and typically does not require treatment. Osteosarcoma has been reported in a few males with germline pathogenic variants.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 8
MedGen UID:
375581
Concept ID:
C1845102
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-8 (DEE8) is an X-linked disorder characterized by seizure onset before 2 years of age and severe developmental delay. Some patients have hyperekplexia (summary by Shimojima et al., 2011). For general phenotypic descriptions and discussions of genetic heterogeneity of developmental and epileptic encephalopathy and hyperekplexia, see DEE1 (308350) and HKPX1 (149400), respectively.
X-linked intellectual disability-retinitis pigmentosa syndrome
MedGen UID:
336862
Concept ID:
C1845136
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked intellectual disability-retinitis pigmentosa syndrome is characterized by moderate intellectual deficit and severe, early-onset retinitis pigmentosa. It has been described in five males spanning three generations of one family. Some patients also had microcephaly. It is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait.
Hartsfield-Bixler-Demyer syndrome
MedGen UID:
335111
Concept ID:
C1845146
Congenital Abnormality
FGFR1-related Hartsfield syndrome comprises two core features: holoprosencephaly (HPE) spectrum disorder and ectrodactyly spectrum disorder. HPE spectrum disorder, resulting from failed or incomplete forebrain division early in gestation, includes alobar, semilobar, or lobar HPE. Other observed midline brain malformations include corpus callosum agenesis, absent septum pellucidum, absent olfactory bulbs and tracts, and vermian hypoplasia. Other findings associated with the HPE spectrum such as craniofacial dysmorphism, neurologic issues (developmental delay, spasticity, seizures, hypothalamic dysfunction), feeding problems, and endocrine issues (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and central insipidus diabetes) are common. Ectrodactyly spectrum disorders are unilateral or bilateral malformations of the hands and/or feet characterized by a median cleft of hand or foot due to absence of the longitudinal central rays (also called split-hand/foot malformation). The number of digits on the right and left can vary. Polydactyly and syndactyly can also be seen.
Syndromic X-linked intellectual disability Hedera type
MedGen UID:
337257
Concept ID:
C1845543
Disease or Syndrome
The Hedera type of X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder (MRXSH) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy and progressive neurologic decline with abnormal movements, spasticity, and seizures. Brain imaging shows volume loss of cortical white and gray matter, thin corpus callosum, and myelination defects, consistent with a neurodegenerative process. Only males are affected (summary by Hirose et al., 2019).
Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome
MedGen UID:
337000
Concept ID:
C1845668
Disease or Syndrome
Polymicrogyria (PMG) is a malformation of cortical development in which the brain surface is irregular and the normal gyral pattern replaced by multiple small, partly fused gyri separated by shallow sulci. Microscopic examination shows a simplified 4-layered or unlayered cortex. Several patterns of PMG, including bilateral frontal, bilateral perisylvian, and bilateral mesial occipital PMG, have been described on the basis of their topographic distribution. All but the perisylvian form appear to be rare. Bilateral perisylvian PMG (BPP) often results in a typical clinical syndrome that is manifested by mild mental retardation, epilepsy, and pseudobulbar palsy, which causes difficulties with expressive speech and feeding (Kuzniecky et al., 1993). PMG may be a feature of other conditions as well (see, e.g., 300643).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 9
MedGen UID:
338393
Concept ID:
C1848137
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-9 (DEE9) is an X-linked disorder characterized by seizure onset in infancy and mild to severe intellectual impairment. Autistic and psychiatric features have been reported in some individuals. The disorder affects heterozygous females only; transmitting males are unaffected (summary by Jamal et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, see 308350.
CHIME syndrome
MedGen UID:
341214
Concept ID:
C1848392
Disease or Syndrome
CHIME syndrome, also known as Zunich neuroectodermal syndrome, is an extremely rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder clinically characterized by colobomas, congenital heart defects, migratory ichthyosiform dermatosis, mental retardation, and ear anomalies (CHIME). Other clinical features include distinctive facial features, abnormal growth, genitourinary abnormalities, seizures, and feeding difficulties (summary by Ng et al., 2012). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy
MedGen UID:
340341
Concept ID:
C1849508
Disease or Syndrome
Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy – ALDH7A1 (PDE-ALDH7A1) is characterized by seizures not well controlled with anti-seizure medication that are responsive clinically and electrographically to large daily supplements of pyridoxine (vitamin B6). This is true across a phenotypic spectrum that ranges from classic to atypical PDE-ALDH7A1. Intellectual disability is common, particularly in classic PDE-ALDH7A1. Classic PDE-ALDH7A1. Untreated seizures begin within the first weeks to months of life. Dramatic presentations of prolonged seizures and recurrent episodes of status epilepticus are typical; recurrent self-limited events including partial seizures, generalized seizures, atonic seizures, myoclonic events, and infantile spasms also occur. Electrographic seizures can occur without clinical correlates. Atypical PDE-ALDH7A1. Findings in untreated individuals can include late-onset seizures beginning between late infancy and age three years, seizures that initially respond to anti-seizure medication and then become intractable, seizures during early life that do not respond to pyridoxine but are subsequently controlled with pyridoxine several months later, and prolonged seizure-free intervals (=5 months) that occur after discontinuation of pyridoxine.
PEHO-like syndrome
MedGen UID:
337956
Concept ID:
C1850056
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neurological disease characterized by progressive encephalopathy, early-onset seizures with a hypsarrhythmic pattern, facial and limb edema, severe hypotonia, early arrest of psychomotor development and craniofacial dysmorphism (evolving microcephaly, narrow forehead, short nose, prominent auricles, open mouth, micrognathia), in the absence of neuro-ophthalmic or neuroradiologic findings. Poor visual responsiveness, growth failure and tapering fingers are also associated. There is evidence the disease is caused by homozygous mutation in the CCDC88A gene on chromosome 2p16.
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
338026
Concept ID:
C1850343
Disease or Syndrome
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy (MVA) syndrome is a rare disorder in which some cells in the body have an abnormal number of chromosomes instead of the usual 46 chromosomes, a situation known as aneuploidy. Most commonly, cells have an extra chromosome, which is called trisomy, or are missing a chromosome, which is known as monosomy. In MVA syndrome, some cells are aneuploid and others have the normal number of chromosomes, which is a phenomenon known as mosaicism. Typically, at least one-quarter of cells in affected individuals have an abnormal number of chromosomes. Because the additional or missing chromosomes vary among the abnormal cells, the aneuploidy is described as variegated.\n\nThere are at least three types of MVA syndrome, each with a different genetic cause. Type 1 is the most common and displays the classic signs and symptoms described above. Type 2 appears to have slightly different signs and symptoms than type 1, although the small number of affected individuals makes it difficult to define its characteristic features. Individuals with MVA syndrome type 2 grow slowly before and after birth; however, their head size is typically normal. Some people with MVA syndrome type 2 have unusually short arms. Individuals with MVA syndrome type 2 do not seem to have an increased risk of cancer. Another form of MVA syndrome is characterized by a high risk of developing Wilms tumor. Individuals with this form may also have other signs and symptoms typical of MVA syndrome type 1.\n\nIn MVA syndrome, growth before birth is slow (intrauterine growth restriction). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate and are shorter than average. In addition, they typically have an unusually small head size (microcephaly). Another common feature of MVA syndrome is an increased risk of developing cancer in childhood. Cancers that occur most frequently in affected individuals include a cancer of muscle tissue called rhabdomyosarcoma, a form of kidney cancer known as Wilms tumor, and a cancer of the blood-forming tissue known as leukemia.\n\nLess commonly, people with MVA syndrome have eye abnormalities or distinctive facial features, such as a broad nasal bridge and low-set ears. Some affected individuals have brain abnormalities, the most common of which is called Dandy-Walker malformation. Intellectual disability, seizures, and other health problems can also occur in people with MVA syndrome.
Epilepsy, progressive myoclonic, 2b
MedGen UID:
340621
Concept ID:
C1850764
Disease or Syndrome
The Lafora type of progressive myoclonic epilepsy is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by insidious onset of progressive neurodegeneration between 8 and 18 years of age. Initial features can include headache, difficulties in school work, myoclonic jerks, generalized seizures, and often visual hallucination. The myoclonus, seizures, and hallucinations gradually worsen and become intractable. This is accompanied by progressive cognitive decline, resulting in dementia. About 10 years after onset, affected individuals are in near-continuous myoclonus with absence seizures, frequent generalized seizures, and profound dementia or a vegetative state. Histologic studies of multiple tissues, including brain, muscle, liver, and heart show intracellular Lafora bodies, which are dense accumulations of malformed and insoluble glycogen molecules, termed polyglucosans (review by Ramachandran et al., 2009). There is a slower progression of disease and later age at death in Lafora disease-2 than in Lafora disease-1 (MELF1, EPM2A; 254780); see Genotype/Phenotype Correlations. Myoclonic epilepsy of Lafora-1 is caused by mutation in the EPM2A gene (608072), which encodes laforin, on chromosome 6q24. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Myoclonic epilepsy, juvenile, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
342587
Concept ID:
C1850778
Finding
Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (EJM, JME) is a subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (EIG; see 600669), affecting up to 26% of all individuals with EIG. Individuals with EJM have afebrile seizures only, with onset in adolescence of myoclonic jerks. Myoclonic jerks usually occur in the morning (Janz and Durner, 1997). Genetic Heterogeneity of Juvenile Myoclonic Seizures Susceptibility to EJM can be conferred by variation in several other genes: EJM5 (611136), by variation in the GABRA1 gene (137160) on 5q34; EJM6 (see 607682), by variation in the CACNB4 gene (601949) on 2q23; EJM7 (see 613060), by variation in the GABRD gene (137163) on 1p36; EJM8 (see 607628), by variation in the CLCN2 gene (600570) on 3q27; and EJM10 (617924), by variation in the ICK gene (612325) on chromosome 6p12. In addition, EJM loci have been identified by linkage analysis: EJM2 (see 604827) on 15q14, EJM3 (608816) on 6p21, EJM4 (611364) on 5q12-q14, and EJM9 (614280) on 2q33-q36.
Febrile seizures, familial, 1
MedGen UID:
338959
Concept ID:
C1852577
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood seizures associated with febrile episodes are relatively common and represent the majority of childhood seizures. A febrile convulsion is defined as a seizure event in infancy or childhood, usually occurring between 6 months and 6 years of age, associated with fever but without any evidence of intracranial infection or defined pathologic or traumatic cause (Nabbout et al., 2002). Although the majority of patients do not develop epilepsy, the risk of developing subsequent afebrile seizures is 5 to 7 times higher in those with a history of febrile seizures compared to the general population (Annegers et al., 1987; Hedera et al., 2006). The FEB1 locus maps to chromosome 8q13-q21. Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Febrile Seizures See FEB2 (602477), caused by mutation in the HCN2 gene (602781) on chromosome 19p13; FEB3A (604403), caused by mutation in the SCN1A gene (182389) on chromosome 2q24; FEB4 (604352), caused by mutation in the ADGRV1 gene (602851) on chromosome 5q14; FEB8 (607681), caused by mutation in the GABRG2 gene (137164) on chromosome 5q31; and FEB11 (614418), caused by mutation in the CPA6 gene (609562) on chromosome 8q13. Several loci for familial febrile seizures have been identified: see FEB3B (613863) on chromosome 2q24; FEB5 (609255) on chromosome 6q22-q24; FEB6 (609253) on chromosome 18p11; FEB7 (611515) on chromosome 21q22; FEB9 (611634) on chromosome 3p24.2-p23; and FEB10 (612637) on chromosome 3q26. A phenotype termed 'generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus' (GEFS+; 604233) is a clinical subset of familial febrile convulsions in which affected individuals later develop afebrile seizures. GEFS+ is associated with mutations in several genes. Deprez et al. (2009) provided a review of the genetics of epilepsy syndromes starting in the first year of life, and included a diagnostic algorithm.
Seizures, benign familial neonatal, 2
MedGen UID:
377707
Concept ID:
C1852581
Disease or Syndrome
KCNQ3-related disorders include benign familial neonatal epilepsy (BFNE) and benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE), seizure disorders that occur in children who typically have normal psychomotor development. An additional KCNQ3-related disorder involves developmental disability. In BFNE seizures begin in an otherwise healthy infant between days two and eight of life and spontaneously disappear between the first and the sixth to 12th month of life. Seizures are generally brief, lasting one to two minutes. Seizure types include tonic or apneic episodes, focal clonic activity, and autonomic changes. Motor activity may be confined to one body part, migrate to other regions, or generalize. Infants are well between seizures and feed normally. In BFIE seizures start in the first year of life, beyond the neonatal period, and disappear after age one to two years. Seizures are generally brief, lasting two minutes; they appear as daily repeated clusters. Seizure type is usually focal, but can be also generalized, causing diffuse hypertonia with jerks of the limbs, head deviation, or motor arrest with unconsciousness and cyanosis. Infants are normal between seizures and psychomotor development is usually normal. In the KCNQ3-related developmental disability phenotype, individuals present with intellectual disability with or without seizures and/or cortical visual impairment. As little clinical information on these individuals is available, the clinical presentation of KCNQ3-related developmental disability remains to be defined.
Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, type 4
MedGen UID:
342858
Concept ID:
C1853345
Disease or Syndrome
Seizures, benign familial infantile, 2
MedGen UID:
381313
Concept ID:
C1853995
Disease or Syndrome
PRRT2-associated paroxysmal movement disorders (PRRT2-PxMD) include paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE), paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with infantile convulsions (PKD/IC), and hemiplegic migraine (HM). In addition, PRRT2 pathogenic variants have been identified in other childhood-onset movement disorders and different types of seizures, suggesting that the understanding of the spectrum of PRRT2-PxMD is still evolving. The paroxysmal attacks in PKD are characterized by dystonia, choreoathetosis, and less commonly ballismus. The seizures of BFIE are usually focal with or without generalization. Thirty percent of PRRT2-associated PKD is associated with BFIE and is referred to as PKD/IC.
Sulfite oxidase deficiency due to molybdenum cofactor deficiency type B
MedGen UID:
340760
Concept ID:
C1854989
Disease or Syndrome
Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) represents a spectrum, with some individuals experiencing significant signs and symptoms in the neonatal period and early infancy (termed early-onset or severe MoCD) and others developing signs and symptoms in childhood or adulthood (termed late-onset or mild MoCD). Individuals with early-onset MoCD typically present in the first days of life with severe encephalopathy, including refractory seizures, opisthotonos, axial and appendicular hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and apnea. Head imaging may demonstrate loss of gray and white matter differentiation, gyral swelling, sulci injury (typically assessed by evaluating the depth of focal lesional injury within the sulci), diffusely elevated T2-weighted signal, and panlobar diffusion restriction throughout the forebrain and midbrain with relative sparring of the brain stem. Prognosis for early-onset MoCD is poor, with about 75% succumbing in infancy to secondary complications of their neurologic disability (i.e., pneumonia). Late-onset MoCD is typically characterized by milder symptoms, such as acute neurologic decompensation in the setting of infection. Episodes vary in nature but commonly consist of altered mental status, dystonia, choreoathetosis, ataxia, nystagmus, and fluctuating hypotonia and hypertonia. These features may improve after resolution of the inciting infection or progress in a gradual or stochastic manner over the lifetime. Brain imaging may be normal or may demonstrate T2-weighted hyperintense or cystic lesions in the globus pallidus, thinning of the corpus callosum, and cerebellar atrophy.
Sulfite oxidase deficiency due to molybdenum cofactor deficiency type C
MedGen UID:
340761
Concept ID:
C1854990
Disease or Syndrome
Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) represents a spectrum, with some individuals experiencing significant signs and symptoms in the neonatal period and early infancy (termed early-onset or severe MoCD) and others developing signs and symptoms in childhood or adulthood (termed late-onset or mild MoCD). Individuals with early-onset MoCD typically present in the first days of life with severe encephalopathy, including refractory seizures, opisthotonos, axial and appendicular hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and apnea. Head imaging may demonstrate loss of gray and white matter differentiation, gyral swelling, sulci injury (typically assessed by evaluating the depth of focal lesional injury within the sulci), diffusely elevated T2-weighted signal, and panlobar diffusion restriction throughout the forebrain and midbrain with relative sparring of the brain stem. Prognosis for early-onset MoCD is poor, with about 75% succumbing in infancy to secondary complications of their neurologic disability (i.e., pneumonia). Late-onset MoCD is typically characterized by milder symptoms, such as acute neurologic decompensation in the setting of infection. Episodes vary in nature but commonly consist of altered mental status, dystonia, choreoathetosis, ataxia, nystagmus, and fluctuating hypotonia and hypertonia. These features may improve after resolution of the inciting infection or progress in a gradual or stochastic manner over the lifetime. Brain imaging may be normal or may demonstrate T2-weighted hyperintense or cystic lesions in the globus pallidus, thinning of the corpus callosum, and cerebellar atrophy.
Febrile seizures, familial, 4
MedGen UID:
347652
Concept ID:
C1858493
Disease or Syndrome
Any febrile seizures, familial in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ADGRV1 gene.
Microcephaly 2, primary, autosomal recessive, with or without cortical malformations
MedGen UID:
346929
Concept ID:
C1858535
Disease or Syndrome
In WDR62 primary microcephaly (WDR62-MCPH), microcephaly (occipitofrontal circumference [OFC] = -2 SD) is usually present at birth, but in some instances becomes evident later in the first year of life. Growth is otherwise normal. Except for brain malformations in most affected individuals, no other congenital malformations are observed. Central nervous system involvement can include delayed motor development, mild-to-severe intellectual disability (ID), behavior problems, epilepsy, spasticity, and ataxia.
Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, type 1
MedGen UID:
348994
Concept ID:
C1858672
Disease or Syndrome
Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus type 1 (GEFSP1) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset of seizures associated with fever in infancy or early childhood. There is wide phenotypic variability, even within families. In contrast to classic febrile seizures (see, e.g., FEB1, 121210), which affect approximately 3% of children under 6 years of age and typically spontaneously remit by age 6 years, patients with GEFSP1 either have febrile seizures extending beyond age 6 years or develop epilepsy with afebrile seizures. Other seizure types include absence seizures, partial seizures, myoclonic seizures, and atonic seizures. Some patients may have developmental delay after the onset of seizures (summary by Wallace et al., 1998 and Singh et al., 1999). Deprez et al. (2009) reviewed the genetics of epilepsy syndromes starting in the first year of life, and included a diagnostic algorithm. Genetic Heterogeneity of GEFS+ GEFS+ is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. See also GEFS+2 (604403), caused by mutation in the SCN1A gene (182389) on chromosome 2q24; GEFS+3 (see 607681), caused by mutation in the GABRG2 gene (137164) on chromosome 5q34; GEFS+5 (613060), associated with variation in the GABRD (137163) gene on chromosome 1p36; GEFS+9 (616172), caused by mutation in the STX1B gene (601485) on chromosome 16p11; GEFS+10 (618482), caused by mutation in the HCN1 gene (602780) on chromosome 5p12; GEFS+11 (602477), caused by mutation in the HCN2 gene (602781) on chromosome 19p13; and GEFS+12 (620755), caused by mutation in the SLC32A1 gene (616440) on chromosome 20q11. Several putative loci have also been identified; see GEFS+4 (609800), mapped to chromosome 2p24; GEFS+6 (612279), mapped to chromosome 8p23-p21; GEFS+7 (613863), mapped to chromosome 2q24; and GEFS+8 (613828), mapped to chromosome 6q16.3-q22.31.
Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, type 2
MedGen UID:
388117
Concept ID:
C1858673
Disease or Syndrome
SCN1A seizure disorders encompass a spectrum that ranges from simple febrile seizures and generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) at the mild end to Dravet syndrome and intractable childhood epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (ICE-GTC) at the severe end. Phenotypes with intractable seizures including Dravet syndrome are often associated with cognitive decline. Less commonly observed phenotypes include myoclonic astatic epilepsy (MAE), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, infantile spasms, epilepsy with focal seizures, and vaccine-related encephalopathy and seizures. The phenotype of SCN1A seizure disorders can vary even within the same family.
Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy 2
MedGen UID:
351053
Concept ID:
C1864125
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is characterized by clusters of nocturnal motor seizures, which are often stereotyped and brief (5 seconds to 5 minutes). They vary from simple arousals from sleep to dramatic, often bizarre hyperkinetic events with tonic or dystonic features. Affected individuals may experience aura. Retained awareness during seizures is common. A minority of individuals experience daytime seizures. Onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. About 80% of individuals develop ADNFLE in the first two decades of life; mean age of onset is ten years. Clinical neurologic examination is normal and intellect is usually preserved, but reduced intellect, psychiatric comorbidity, or cognitive deficits may occur. Within a family, the manifestations of the disorder may vary considerably. ADNFLE is lifelong but not progressive. As an individual reaches middle age, attacks may become milder and less frequent.
Fatal mitochondrial disease due to combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 3
MedGen UID:
355842
Concept ID:
C1864840
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency type 3 is an extremely rare clinically heterogenous disorder described in about 5 patients to date. Clinical signs included hypotonia, lactic acidosis, and hepatic insufficiency, with progressive encephalomyopathy or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 8 northern epilepsy variant
MedGen UID:
355328
Concept ID:
C1864923
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; CLN) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in different patterns ultrastructurally. The lipopigment patterns observed most often in CLN8 comprise mixed combinations of 'granular,' 'curvilinear,' and 'fingerprint' profiles (Mole et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CLN, see CLN1 (256730).
Migraine, familial hemiplegic, 2
MedGen UID:
355962
Concept ID:
C1865322
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) falls within the category of migraine with aura. In migraine with aura (including FHM) the neurologic symptoms of aura are unequivocally localizable to the cerebral cortex or brain stem and include visual disturbance (most common), sensory loss (e.g., numbness or paresthesias of the face or an extremity), and dysphasia (difficulty with speech). FHM must include motor involvement, such as hemiparesis (weakness of an extremity). Hemiparesis occurs with at least one other symptom during FHM aura. Neurologic deficits with FHM attacks can be prolonged for hours to days and may outlast the associated migrainous headache. FHM is often earlier in onset than typical migraine, frequently beginning in the first or second decade; the frequency of attacks tends to decrease with age. Approximately 40%-50% of families with CACNA1A-FHM have cerebellar signs ranging from nystagmus to progressive, usually late-onset mild ataxia.
Episodic ataxia type 5
MedGen UID:
356142
Concept ID:
C1866039
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare form of hereditary episodic ataxia with characteristics of recurrent episodes of vertigo and ataxia lasting several hours.
Glycogen storage disease due to muscle and heart glycogen synthase deficiency
MedGen UID:
409741
Concept ID:
C1969054
Disease or Syndrome
The signs and symptoms of muscle GSD 0 typically begin in early childhood. Affected individuals often experience muscle pain and weakness or episodes of fainting (syncope) following moderate physical activity, such as walking up stairs. The loss of consciousness that occurs with fainting typically lasts up to several hours. Some individuals with muscle GSD 0 have a disruption of the heart's normal rhythm (arrhythmia) known as long QT syndrome. In all affected individuals, muscle GSD 0 impairs the heart's ability to effectively pump blood and increases the risk of cardiac arrest and sudden death, particularly after physical activity. Sudden death from cardiac arrest can occur in childhood or adolescence in people with muscle GSD 0.\n\nIndividuals with liver GSD 0 usually show signs and symptoms of the disorder in infancy. People with this disorder develop low blood sugar (glucose), known as hypoglycemia, after going long periods of time without food (fasting). Signs of hypoglycemia become apparent when affected infants begin sleeping through the night and stop late-night feedings; these infants exhibit extreme tiredness (lethargy), pale skin (pallor), and nausea. During episodes of fasting, ketone levels in the blood may increase (ketosis). Ketones are molecules produced during the breakdown of fats, which occurs when stored sugars (such as glycogen) are unavailable. These short-term signs and symptoms of liver GSD 0 often improve when food is eaten and glucose levels in the body return to normal. The features of liver GSD 0 vary; they can be mild and go unnoticed for years, or they can include developmental delay and growth failure.\n\nGlycogen storage disease type 0 (also known as GSD 0) is a condition caused by the body's inability to form a complex sugar called glycogen, which is a major source of stored energy in the body. GSD 0 has two types: in muscle GSD 0, glycogen formation in the muscles is impaired, and in liver GSD 0, glycogen formation in the liver is impaired.
Myoclonic epilepsy, juvenile, susceptibility to, 4
MedGen UID:
370067
Concept ID:
C1969656
Disease or Syndrome
Febrile seizures, familial, 8
MedGen UID:
370755
Concept ID:
C1969810
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the GABRG2 gene cause a spectrum of seizure disorders, ranging from early-onset isolated febrile seizures (FS) to childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) to generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, type 3 (GEFS+3), which tends to represent a more severe phenotype. Patients with isolated febrile seizures usually have onset in the first year of life and show spontaneous remission by age 6 years. Many of these patients may later develop absence seizures, which may also spontaneously remit, whereas a few may continue to have various types of febrile and afebrile seizures that persist beyond childhood, consistent with GEFS+. There is phenotypic variability in the seizure type, even within a family carrying the same mutation, suggesting that other loci may be involved (summary by Singh et al., 1999 and Marini et al., 2003). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial febrile seizures, see 121210. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GEFS+, see 604233. For a phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of childhood absence epilepsy, see 600131.
15q11q13 microduplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
390767
Concept ID:
C2675336
Disease or Syndrome
Maternal 15q duplication syndrome (maternal dup15q) is characterized by hypotonia and motor delays, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and epilepsy including infantile spasms. Rarely, maternal dup15q may also be associated with psychosis or sudden unexplained death. Those with a maternal isodicentric 15q11.2-q13.1 supernumerary chromosome are typically more severely affected than those with an interstitial duplication.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 5
MedGen UID:
382611
Concept ID:
C2675473
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
SYNGAP1-related intellectual disability (SYNGAP1-ID) is characterized by developmental delay (DD) or intellectual disability (ID) (100% of affected individuals), generalized epilepsy (~84%), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other behavioral abnormalities (=50%). To date more than 50 individuals with SYNGAP1-ID have been reported. In the majority DD/ID was moderate to severe; in some it was mild. The epilepsy is generalized; a subset of individuals with epilepsy have myoclonic astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome) or epilepsy with myoclonic absences. Behavioral abnormalities can include stereotypic behaviors (e.g., hand flapping, obsessions with certain objects) as well as poor social development. Feeding difficulties can be significant in some.
Chromosome 1q21.1 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
393913
Concept ID:
C2675897
Congenital Abnormality
The 1q21.1 recurrent microdeletion itself does not appear to lead to a clinically recognizable syndrome as some persons with the deletion have no obvious clinical findings and others have variable findings that most commonly include microcephaly (50%), mild intellectual disability (30%), mildly dysmorphic facial features, and eye abnormalities (26%). Other findings can include cardiac defects, genitourinary anomalies, skeletal malformations, and seizures (~15%). Psychiatric and behavioral abnormalities can include autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autistic features, and sleep disturbances.
Chromosome 2q32-q33 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
436765
Concept ID:
C2676739
Disease or Syndrome
SATB2-associated syndrome (SAS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by significant neurodevelopmental compromise with limited to absent speech, behavioral issues, and craniofacial anomalies. All individuals described to date have manifest developmental delay / intellectual disability, with severe speech delay. Affected individuals often have hypotonia and feeding difficulties in infancy. Behavioral issues may include autistic features, hyperactivity, and aggressiveness. Craniofacial anomalies may include palatal abnormalities (cleft palate, high-arched palate, and bifid uvula), micrognathia, and abnormal shape or size of the upper central incisors. Less common features include skeletal anomalies (osteopenia, pectus deformities, kyphosis/lordosis, and scoliosis), growth restriction, strabismus/refractive errors, congenital heart defects, genitourinary anomalies, and epilepsy. While dysmorphic features have been described in individuals with this condition, these features are not typically distinctive enough to allow for a clinical diagnosis of SAS.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 4
MedGen UID:
436917
Concept ID:
C2677326
Disease or Syndrome
STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy is characterized by early-onset encephalopathy with epilepsy (i.e., moderate-to-severe intellectual disability, refractory seizures, and ongoing epileptiform activity). The median age of onset of seizures is six weeks (range 1 day to 13 years). Seizure types can include infantile spasms; generalized tonic-clonic, clonic, or tonic seizures; and myoclonic, focal, atonic, and absence seizures. Epilepsy syndromes can include Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome, and Dravet syndrome (not SCN1A-related), classic Rett syndrome (not MECP2-related), and atypical Rett syndrome (not CDKL5-related). The EEG is characterized by focal epileptic activity, burst suppression, hypsarrhythmia, or generalized spike-and-slow waves. Other findings can include abnormal tone, movement disorders (especially ataxia and dystonia), and behavior disorders (including autism spectrum disorder). Feeding difficulties are common.
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 9
MedGen UID:
413424
Concept ID:
C2750887
Finding
For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of idiopathic generalized epilepsy, see 600669. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsy; see 254770 for a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of JME.
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 10
MedGen UID:
414062
Concept ID:
C2751603
Finding
Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (EIG) is a broad term that encompasses several common seizure phenotypes, classically including childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, ECA), juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE), and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME, EJM) (Commission on Classification and Terminology of the International League Against Epilepsy, 1989). Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) shows phenotypic overlap with IGE, and includes patients with early-onset febrile seizures who later develop various types of febrile and afebrile seizures, such as those observed in EIG (summary by Singh et al., 1999). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EIG, see 600669. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GEFS+, see 604233. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EJM, see 254770.
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 7
MedGen UID:
442800
Concept ID:
C2751729
Finding
Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, type 7
MedGen UID:
416630
Concept ID:
C2751778
Disease or Syndrome
Patients with isolated febrile seizures (FEB3B) usually have onset between ages 5 months to 4 years and show spontaneous remission by age 6 years (summary by Singh et al., 2009), whereas patients with GEFS+ continue to have various types of febrile and afebrile seizures later in life (summary by Singh et al., 1999). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GEFS+, see 604233. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial febrile seizures, see 121210.
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 8
MedGen UID:
414549
Concept ID:
C2752062
Finding
Any generalized epilepsy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CASR gene.
Oxoglutaricaciduria
MedGen UID:
414553
Concept ID:
C2752074
Disease or Syndrome
Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase deficiency (OGDHD) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with features of infantile- and pediatric-onset basal ganglia-associated movement disorders, hypotonia, developmental delays, ataxia, and seizures (summary by Yap et al., 2021).
Intellectual disability, X-linked 1
MedGen UID:
444070
Concept ID:
C2931498
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
An X-linked dominant condition caused by mutation(s) in the IQSEC2 gene, encoding IQ motif and SEC7 domain-containing protein 2. It is characterized by substantially impaired intellectual functioning and behavioral abnormalities.
Seizures, benign familial neonatal, 1
MedGen UID:
460425
Concept ID:
C3149074
Disease or Syndrome
KCNQ2-related disorders represent a continuum of overlapping neonatal epileptic phenotypes ranging from self-limited familial neonatal epilepsy (SLFNE) at the mild end to neonatal-onset developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (NEO-DEE) at the severe end. Additional, less common phenotypes consisting of neonatal encephalopathy with non-epileptic myoclonus, infantile or childhood-onset developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE), and isolated intellectual disability (ID) without epilepsy have also been described. KCNQ2-SLFNE is characterized by seizures that start in otherwise healthy infants between two and eight days after term birth and spontaneously disappear between the first and the sixth to 12th month of life. There is always a seizure-free interval between birth and the onset of seizures. Seizures are characterized by sudden onset with prominent motor involvement, often accompanied by apnea and cyanosis; video EEG identifies seizures as focal onset with tonic stiffening of limb(s) and some migration during each seizure's evolution. About 30% of individuals with KCNQ2-SLFNE develop epileptic seizures later in life. KCNQ2-NEO-DEE is characterized by multiple daily seizures beginning in the first week of life that are mostly tonic, with associated focal motor and autonomic features. Seizures generally cease between ages nine months and four years. At onset, EEG shows a burst-suppression pattern or multifocal epileptiform activity; early brain MRI can show basal ganglia hyperdensities and later MRIs may show white matter or general volume loss. Moderate-to-profound developmental impairment is present.
Epilepsy, familial adult myoclonic, 3
MedGen UID:
462210
Concept ID:
C3150860
Disease or Syndrome
Familial adult myoclonic epilepsy-3 (FAME3) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset of cortical tremor, mainly affecting the hands and voice, between 10 and 40 years of age, with adult onset being more common. Most affected individuals develop epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures; some may have partial or absence seizures. The disorder is nonprogressive or slowly progressive, and most patients respond to antiseizure medication (summary by Florian et al., 2019). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial adult myoclonic epilepsy, see FAME1 (601068).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 11
MedGen UID:
462337
Concept ID:
C3150987
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-11 (DEE11) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of seizures in the first days, weeks, or months of life. Some patients may have later onset. Seizures comprise multiple types, including tonic, generalized, and myoclonic, and tend to be refractory to medication. However, some patients with onset of seizures before 3 months of age may respond to sodium channel blockers, particularly phenytoin. About half of patients become seizure-free in childhood. Affected individuals have global developmental delay, usually with severely impaired intellectual development, although some may be less severely affected and show autism spectrum disorder. Additional common features include microcephaly, hypotonia, and abnormal movements, such as dystonia, dyskinesias, and choreoathetotic movements. Brain imaging may show white matter defects. The phenotype is highly variable, even in patients with the same mutation (summary by Ogiwara et al., 2009; Howell et al., 2015; Wolff et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 12
MedGen UID:
462338
Concept ID:
C3150988
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-12 (DEE12) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of refractory seizures in the first year of life. Affected infants may have normal or mildly delayed development before the onset of seizures, but thereafter show severe developmental regression and stagnation. Seizure types vary: focal seizures, infantile spasms, and generalized tonic-clonic seizures may occur, even within the same patient. EEG may show hypsarrhythmia, consistent with West syndrome, or a pattern consistent with 'malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy' (MMPSI). Patients have little or no developmental progress: there is absent speech, hypotonia, poor motor skills, peripheral spasticity, and impaired visual fixation (summary by Kurian et al., 2010 and Poduri et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, see 308350.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 6
MedGen UID:
462761
Concept ID:
C3151411
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
GRIN2B-related neurodevelopmental disorder is characterized by mild to profound developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID) in all affected individuals. Muscle tone abnormalities (spasticity and/or hypotonia, occasionally associated with feeding difficulties), as well as epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) / behavioral issues, are common. Other infantile- or childhood-onset findings include microcephaly; dystonic, dyskinetic, or choreiform movement disorder; and/or cortical visual impairment. Brain MRI reveals a malformation of cortical development in a minority of affected individuals. To date, fewer than 100 individuals with GRIN2B-related neurodevelopmental disorder have been reported.
D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria 1
MedGen UID:
463405
Concept ID:
C3152055
Disease or Syndrome
D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria is a neurometabolic disorder first described by Chalmers et al. (1980). Clinical symptoms include developmental delay, epilepsy, hypotonia, and dysmorphic features. Mild and severe phenotypes were characterized (van der Knaap et al., 1999). The severe phenotype is homogeneous and is characterized by early infantile-onset epileptic encephalopathy and, often, cardiomyopathy. The mild phenotype has a more variable clinical presentation. Genetic Heterogeneity of D-2-Hydroxyglutaric Aciduria D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria-2 (D2HGA2; 613657) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase-2 gene (IDH2; 147650) on chromosome 15q26.
Ogden syndrome
MedGen UID:
477078
Concept ID:
C3275447
Disease or Syndrome
Ogden syndrome (OGDNS) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by postnatal growth failure, severely delayed psychomotor development, variable dysmorphic features, and hypotonia. Many patients also have cardiac malformations or arrhythmias (summary by Popp et al., 2015).
Hypoinsulinemic hypoglycemia and body hemihypertrophy
MedGen UID:
480014
Concept ID:
C3278384
Disease or Syndrome
Hypoinsulinemic hypoglycemia and body hemihypertrophy is a rare, genetic, endocrine disease characterized by neonatal macrosomia, asymmetrical overgrowth (typically manifesting as left-sided hemihypertrophy) and recurrent, severe hypoinsulinemic (or hypoketotic hypo-fatty-acidemic) hypoglycemia in infancy, which results in episodes of reduced consciousness and seizures.
Occipital pachygyria and polymicrogyria
MedGen UID:
481505
Concept ID:
C3279875
Disease or Syndrome
Occipital cortical malformations (OCCM) is an autosomal recessive condition in which affected individuals develop seizures, sometimes associated with transient visual changes. Brain MRI shows both pachygyria and polymicrogyria restricted to the lateral occipital lobes (summary by Barak et al., 2011).
Hyperphosphatasia with intellectual disability syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
481783
Concept ID:
C3280153
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperphosphatasia with impaired intellectual development syndrome-3 (HPMRS3) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability, hypotonia with poor motor development, poor speech, and increased serum alkaline phosphatase (summary by Hansen et al., 2013). However, the severity of the disorder can also vary to include more mild intellectual impairment (Krawitz et al., 2013). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HPMRS, see HPMRS1 (239300). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Warburg micro syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
481833
Concept ID:
C3280203
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Microcephaly, epilepsy, and diabetes syndrome
MedGen UID:
481870
Concept ID:
C3280240
Disease or Syndrome
Primary microcephaly-epilepsy-permanent neonatal diabetes syndrome is a rare, genetic, neurologic disease characterized by congenital microcephaly, severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (manifesting as intractable, myoclonic and/or tonic-clonic seizures), permanent, neonatal, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and severe global developmental delay. Muscular hypotonia, skeletal abnormalities, feeding difficulties, and dysmorphic facial features (including narrow forehead, anteverted nares, small mouth with deep philtrum, tented upper lip vermilion) are frequently associated. Brain MRI reveals cerebral atrophy with cortical gyral simplification and aplasia/hypoplasia of the corpus callosum.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 12
MedGen UID:
482082
Concept ID:
C3280452
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-12 is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of generalized seizures in infancy, delayed psychomotor development with mental retardation, and cerebellar ataxia. Some patients may also show spasticity (summary by Mallaret et al., 2014).
Familial temporal lobe epilepsy 5
MedGen UID:
482360
Concept ID:
C3280730
Disease or Syndrome
A temporal lobe epilepsy that has material basis in heterozygous mutation in the CPA6 gene on chromosome 8q13.
Febrile seizures, familial, 11
MedGen UID:
482364
Concept ID:
C3280734
Disease or Syndrome
Familial febrile seizures-11 is an autosomal recessive seizure disorder characterized by early childhood onset of simple or complex seizures associated with fever. These seizures usually remit later in childhood with no neurologic sequelae (summary by Salzmann et al., 2012). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial febrile seizures, see FEB1 (121210).
Porencephaly 2
MedGen UID:
482600
Concept ID:
C3280970
Disease or Syndrome
Brain small vessel disease-2 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by variable neurologic impairment resulting from disturbed vascular supply that leads to cerebral degeneration. The disorder is often associated with 'porencephaly' on brain imaging. Affected individuals typically have hemiplegia, seizures, and intellectual disability, although the severity is variable (summary by Yoneda et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of brain small vessel disease, see BSVD1 (175780).
Spastic ataxia 5
MedGen UID:
482607
Concept ID:
C3280977
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic ataxia-5 (SPAX5) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by early-onset spasticity resulting in significantly impaired ambulation, cerebellar ataxia, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, and myoclonic epilepsy (summary by Pierson et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of spastic ataxia, see SPAX1 (108600).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 34
MedGen UID:
482674
Concept ID:
C3281044
Disease or Syndrome
MRT34 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by mildly to moderately impaired intellectual development and megalencephaly or enlarged head circumference. Brain imaging shows a mild variant of lissencephaly with anterior-predominant pachygyria with shallow and unusually wide sulci and mildly thickened cortex. Some patients may have seizures (summary by Di Donato et al., 2016).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 13
MedGen UID:
482821
Concept ID:
C3281191
Disease or Syndrome
SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy is characterized by developmental delay, seizure onset in the first 18 months of life (mean 4 months), and intractable epilepsy characterized by multiple seizure types (generalized tonic-clonic seizures, infantile spasms, and absence and focal seizures). Epilepsy syndromes can include Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, West syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathies (e.g., Dravet syndrome). Hypotonia and movement disorders including dystonia, ataxia, and choreoathetosis are common. Psychomotor development varies from normal prior to seizure onset (with subsequent slowing or regression after seizure onset) to abnormal from birth. Intellectual disability, present in all, ranges from mild to severe (in ~50% of affected individuals). Autistic features are noted in some. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) of unknown cause has been reported in approximately 10% of published cases. To date SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy has been reported in the literature in about 50 individuals.
Infantile cerebellar-retinal degeneration
MedGen UID:
482822
Concept ID:
C3281192
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile cerebellar-retinal degeneration (ICRD) is a severe autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset between ages 2 and 6 months of truncal hypotonia, athetosis, seizures, and ophthalmologic abnormalities, particularly optic atrophy and retinal degeneration. Affected individuals show profound psychomotor retardation, with only some achieving rolling, sitting, or recognition of family. Brain MRI shows progressive cerebral and cerebellar degeneration (summary by Spiegel et al., 2012). A subset of patients may have a milder phenotype with variable features, including ataxia, developmental delay, and behavioral abnormalities (Blackburn et al., 2020). Mutation in the ACO2 gene also causes isolated optic atrophy (OPA9; 616289).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 49
MedGen UID:
762260
Concept ID:
C3542549
Disease or Syndrome
TECPR2-related hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy with intellectual disability (TECPR2-HSAN with ID) is characterized by developmental delay and subsequent intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, neurologic manifestations (muscular hypotonia, sensory neuropathy with lower-limb hypo- or areflexia and ataxic gait), and autonomic dysfunction (including central hypoventilation and apnea, gastrointestinal dysmotility, dysphagia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease with recurrent aspiration). To date, more than 30 individuals with TECPR2-HSAN with ID have been identified.
Alternating hemiplegia of childhood 1
MedGen UID:
762361
Concept ID:
C3549447
Disease or Syndrome
Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a rare syndrome of episodic hemi- or quadriplegia lasting minutes to days. Most cases are accompanied by dystonic posturing, choreoathetoid movements, nystagmus, other ocular motor abnormalities, autonomic disturbances, and progressive cognitive impairment (Mikati et al., 1992). The disorder may mimic or overlap with other disorders, including familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM1; 141500) and GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (606777) (Rotstein et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood See also AHC2 (614820), caused by mutation in the ATP1A3 gene (182350).
Hyperekplexia 3
MedGen UID:
766202
Concept ID:
C3553288
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary hyperekplexia may explain some cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which is a major cause of unexplained death in babies younger than 1 year.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of hereditary hyperekplexia typically fade by age 1. However, older individuals with hereditary hyperekplexia may still startle easily and have periods of rigidity, which can cause them to fall down. They may also continue to have hypnagogic myoclonus or movements during sleep. As they get older, individuals with this condition may have a low tolerance for crowded places and loud noises. People with hereditary hyperekplexia who have epilepsy have the seizure disorder throughout their lives.\n\nOther signs and symptoms of hereditary hyperekplexia can include muscle twitches when falling asleep (hypnagogic myoclonus) and movements of the arms or legs while asleep. Some infants, when tapped on the nose, extend their head forward and have spasms of the limb and neck muscles. Rarely, infants with hereditary hyperekplexia experience recurrent seizures (epilepsy).\n\nHereditary hyperekplexia is a condition in which affected infants have increased muscle tone (hypertonia) and an exaggerated startle reaction to unexpected stimuli, especially loud noises. Following the startle reaction, infants experience a brief period in which they are very rigid and unable to move. During these rigid periods, some infants stop breathing, which, if prolonged, can be fatal. Infants with hereditary hyperekplexia have hypertonia at all times, except when they are sleeping.
Cerebellar dysfunction with variable cognitive and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
766575
Concept ID:
C3553661
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar dysfunction with variable cognitive and behavioral abnormalities (CECBA) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder with significant phenotypic heterogeneity, even within families. The disorder is most often diagnosed through genetic analysis with retrospective clinical phenotyping. Symptom onset is usually in early childhood, although later onset, even in adulthood, has been reported. Most affected individuals show global developmental delay from early childhood, particularly of motor and language skills. Many have mild intellectual disability; behavioral and psychiatric abnormalities such as autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder are also often observed. The movement disorder is prominent and may include cerebellar signs such as ataxia, tremor, dysmetria, poor coordination, and dysarthria. Other abnormal movements including spasticity, myoclonus, and dystonia have been reported, thus widening the phenotypic spectrum. Brain imaging is usually normal, but may show cerebellar atrophy or nonspecific white matter lesions. Variable dysmorphic facial features may also be present (summary by Thevenon et al., 2012; Jacobs et al., 2021; Wijnen et al., 2020).
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 12
MedGen UID:
766773
Concept ID:
C3553859
Finding
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 15
MedGen UID:
767230
Concept ID:
C3554316
Disease or Syndrome
Epilepsy, familial adult myoclonic, 4
MedGen UID:
767474
Concept ID:
C3554560
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 13
MedGen UID:
811566
Concept ID:
C3715049
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-13 (CLN13) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive cognitive decline and motor dysfunction leading to dementia and often early death. Some patients develop seizures. Neurons show abnormal accumulation of autofluorescent material (summary by Smith et al., 2013). Adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is sometimes referred to as Kufs disease (see 204300). In a review of the classification of CLN disease, Gardner and Mole (2021) noted that the CLN13 phenotype corresponds to 'Kufs type B', which is characterized by dementia and a variety of motor signs (Smith et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN), see CLN1 (256730).
X-linked intellectual disability, Cantagrel type
MedGen UID:
813060
Concept ID:
C3806730
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked intellectual developmental disorder-98 (XLID98) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, poor speech, behavioral abnormalities, poor overall growth, dysmorphic facial features, and often early-onset seizures. Some carrier females are unaffected, whereas other females with mutations are affected; males tend to be more severely affected than females. It is believed that the phenotypic variability and disease manifestations in female carriers results from skewed X-inactivation or cellular mosaicism (summary by de Lange et al., 2016).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 94
MedGen UID:
815608
Concept ID:
C3809278
Disease or Syndrome
CHD2-related neurodevelopmental disorders are characterized by early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (i.e., refractory seizures and cognitive slowing or regression associated with frequent ongoing epileptiform activity). Seizure onset is typically between ages six months and four years. Seizure types typically include drop attacks, myoclonus, and rapid onset of multiple seizure types associated with generalized spike-wave on EEG, atonic-myoclonic-absence seizures, and clinical photosensitivity. Intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorders are common.
Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
815686
Concept ID:
C3809356
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, lack of psychomotor development, seizures, dysmorphic features, and variable congenital anomalies involving the cardiac, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems. Most affected individuals die before 3 years of age (summary by Maydan et al., 2011). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MCAHS, see MCAHS1 (614080). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Epilepsy, familial adult myoclonic, 5
MedGen UID:
815704
Concept ID:
C3809374
Disease or Syndrome
Familial adult myoclonic epilepsy-5 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of seizures in adolescence, followed by the development of cortical myoclonic tremor later in life. Some patients may also have neuropsychiatric abnormalities (summary by Stogmann et al., 2013).
Aldosterone-producing adenoma with seizures and neurological abnormalities
MedGen UID:
815939
Concept ID:
C3809609
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, neurologic disease characterized by primary hyperaldosteronism presenting with early-onset, severe hypertension, hypokalemia and neurological manifestations (including seizures, severe hypotonia, spasticity, cerebral palsy and profound developmental delay/intellectual disability).
Chromosome 22q13 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
816174
Concept ID:
C3809844
Disease or Syndrome
Macrocephaly-developmental delay syndrome
MedGen UID:
816555
Concept ID:
C3810225
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autosomal recessive intellectual developmental disorder-41 (MRT41) is characterized by macrocephaly and global developmental delay. Some patients have seizures (Baple et al., 2014).
Hyperphosphatasia with intellectual disability syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
816684
Concept ID:
C3810354
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperphosphatasia with impaired intellectual development syndrome-4 (HPMRS4) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development, impaired intellectual development, lack of speech acquisition, seizures, and dysmorphic facial features. Laboratory studies show increased serum alkaline phosphatase (summary by Howard et al., 2014). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HPMRS, see HPMRS1 (239300). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
854382
Concept ID:
C3887523
Disease or Syndrome
Deficiency of very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (VLCAD), which catalyzes the initial step of mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids with a chain length of 14 to 20 carbons, is associated with three phenotypes. The severe early-onset cardiac and multiorgan failure form typically presents in the first months of life with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy, pericardial effusion, and arrhythmias, as well as hypotonia, hepatomegaly, and intermittent hypoglycemia. The hepatic or hypoketotic hypoglycemic form typically presents during early childhood with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly, but without cardiomyopathy. The later-onset episodic myopathic form presents with intermittent rhabdomyolysis provoked by exercise, muscle cramps and/or pain, and/or exercise intolerance. Hypoglycemia typically is not present at the time of symptoms.
Intellectual disability, X-linked 100
MedGen UID:
855516
Concept ID:
C3890167
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked intellectual developmental disorder-100 (XLID100) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by a neurodevelopmental phenotype with impaired intellectual development with or without epilepsy. The phenotypic spectrum also includes hydrocephalus, either isolated or associated with other congenital anomalies, predominantly of the brain, kidneys, and urinary tract (summary by Kalantari et al., 2021).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 42
MedGen UID:
862780
Concept ID:
C4014343
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic features, spasticity, and brain abnormalities (NEDDSBA) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severely delayed global development, with hypotonia, impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech. Most patients have spasticity with limb hypertonia and brisk tendon reflexes. Additional features include nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, structural brain abnormalities, and cortical visual impairment (summary by Bosch et al., 2015). Novarino et al. (2014) labeled the disorder 'spastic paraplegia-67' (SPG67). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 23
MedGen UID:
862929
Concept ID:
C4014492
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-23 (DEE23) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of intractable seizures in the first months of life (range, 2-6 months). Affected individuals have severely impaired psychomotor development with poor or absent speech, cortical blindness, and dysmorphic facial features (summary by Perrault et al., 2014).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 24
MedGen UID:
862968
Concept ID:
C4014531
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-24 (DEE24) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of refractory seizures in infancy, severely impaired global development, intellectual disability, and behavioral abnormalities. Most patients have onset of variable types of seizures between 4 and 13 months of age, but earlier onset in the first days of life has also been reported. Seizures are often triggered by fever, at least initially; status epilepticus may occur (summary by Nava et al., 2014 and Marini et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Webb-Dattani syndrome
MedGen UID:
863145
Concept ID:
C4014708
Disease or Syndrome
Webb-Dattani syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by frontotemporal hypoplasia, globally delayed development, and pituitary and hypothalamic insufficiency due to hypoplastic development of these brain regions. Patients present soon after birth with multiple pituitary hormonal deficiencies and subsequently develop microcephaly, seizures, and spasticity. Other features include postretinal blindness and renal abnormalities (summary by Webb et al., 2013).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 44
MedGen UID:
863182
Concept ID:
C4014745
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Any autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the METTL23 gene.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 26
MedGen UID:
863556
Concept ID:
C4015119
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-26 (DEE26) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of variable types of seizures late in infancy or in the first years of life. Affected children show developmental delay with intellectual disability, poor speech, and behavioral abnormalities. EEG shows multifocal epileptic discharges, and may show hypsarrhythmia (summary by Torkamani et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 30
MedGen UID:
863604
Concept ID:
C4015167
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-30 with speech delay and behavioral abnormalities (MRD30) is characterized by developmental delay apparent from early infancy. Cognitive impairment is variable; many patients are able to attend special schools. Behavioral abnormalities, including ADHD, autistic features, and aggression are commonly observed. Additional features may include various types of seizures, hypotonia, mild skeletal defects, feeding difficulties, and dysmorphic features (Yates et al., 2020; Oates et al., 2021).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 27
MedGen UID:
863753
Concept ID:
C4015316
Disease or Syndrome
GRIN2B-related neurodevelopmental disorder is characterized by mild to profound developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID) in all affected individuals. Muscle tone abnormalities (spasticity and/or hypotonia, occasionally associated with feeding difficulties), as well as epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) / behavioral issues, are common. Other infantile- or childhood-onset findings include microcephaly; dystonic, dyskinetic, or choreiform movement disorder; and/or cortical visual impairment. Brain MRI reveals a malformation of cortical development in a minority of affected individuals. To date, fewer than 100 individuals with GRIN2B-related neurodevelopmental disorder have been reported.
Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, type 9
MedGen UID:
863832
Concept ID:
C4015395
Disease or Syndrome
Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus-9 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset of febrile and/or afebrile seizures in early childhood, usually before age 3 years. Seizure types are variable and include generalized tonic-clonic, atonic, myoclonic, complex partial, and absence. Most patients have remission of seizures later in childhood with no residual neurologic deficits, but rare patients may show mild developmental delay or mild intellectual disabilities (summary by Schubert et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GEFS+, see 604233.
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 7
MedGen UID:
863857
Concept ID:
C4015420
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy-7 (EPM7) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of severe progressive myoclonus and infrequent tonic-clonic seizures in the first or second decades of life. Most patients become wheelchair-bound; some patients may have cognitive decline (summary by Muona et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 34
MedGen UID:
907277
Concept ID:
C4225156
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Any autosomal dominant non-syndromic intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the COL4A3BP gene.
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 14
MedGen UID:
903934
Concept ID:
C4225245
Finding
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 9
MedGen UID:
901242
Concept ID:
C4225289
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neurological disorder with characteristics of childhood-onset severe myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizures and early-onset ataxia leading to severe gait disturbances associated with normal to slightly diminished cognition. Scoliosis, diffuse muscle atrophy and subcutaneous fat loss, as well as developmental delay, may be associated. Brain MRI may reveal complete agenesis of the corpus callosum, ventriculomegaly, interhemispheric cysts and simplified gyration (frontally).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 33
MedGen UID:
897930
Concept ID:
C4225337
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-33 (DEE33) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first months of life. Affected individuals show severe global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and poor or absent speech (summary by de Ligt et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 31
MedGen UID:
894942
Concept ID:
C4225357
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-31A (DEE31A) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by the global developmental delay apparent in early infancy. Most individuals have onset of various types of refractory seizures in the first months or years of life, which exacerbates the psychomotor deficits. Patients have hypotonia and profound intellectual disability with absent speech and inability to walk or ataxic gait. Some patients may have additional features, including dysmorphic features or cortical visual impairment (summary by the EuroEPINOMICS-RES Consortium et al., 2014 and Deciphering Developmental Disorders Study, 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 30
MedGen UID:
898954
Concept ID:
C4225360
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-30 (DEE30) is a severe neurologic disorder characterized by onset of refractory seizures soon after birth or in the first months of life. Seizure types include early myoclonic encephalopathy (EME), Ohtahara syndrome, and infantile spasms; most are refractory to treatment. Patients with earlier seizure onset make essentially no developmental progress and may die in infancy. Those with later onset show profoundly impaired global development with absent speech, poor eye contact, inability to walk, behavioral abnormalities, and feeding difficulties that may require a feeding tube (summary by Hansen et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
906606
Concept ID:
C4225388
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with spastic paraplegia and microcephaly (NEDSPM) is an autosomal recessive neurologic syndrome characterized by delayed psychomotor development with delayed walking, moderately to severely impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech. More severely affected individuals show poor overall growth with progressive microcephaly, axial hypotonia, oromotor dysfunction with drooling, joint contractures, and spastic paraplegia resulting in walking difficulties. Some patients may develop seizures; nonspecific dysmorphic features have also been reported (summary by Hengel et al., 2018 and Ouyang et al., 2019).
Lissencephaly due to TUBA1A mutation
MedGen UID:
930822
Concept ID:
C4305153
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital cortical development anomaly due to abnormal neuronal migration involving neocortical and hippocampal lamination, corpus callosum, cerebellum and brainstem. A large clinical spectrum can be observed, from children with severe epilepsy and intellectual and motor deficit to cases with severe cerebral dysgenesis in the antenatal period leading to pregnancy termination due to the severity of the prognosis.
Epilepsy, early-onset, vitamin B6-dependent
MedGen UID:
934599
Concept ID:
C4310632
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset vitamin B6-dependent epilepsy-1 (EPEO1) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of seizures in the neonatal period or first months of life. The seizures show favorable response to treatment with activated vitamin B6 (pyridoxal 5-prime-phosphate; PLP) and/or pyridoxine. However, most patients show delayed psychomotor development (Darin et al., 2016). Genetic Heterogeneity of Early-Onset Epilepsy EPEO2 (618832) is caused by mutation in the SETD1A gene (611052) on chromosome 16p11. EPEO3 (620465) is caused by mutation in the ATP6V0C gene (108745) on chromosome 16p13. EPEO4 (266100) is caused by mutation in the ALDH7A1 gene (107323) on chromosome 5q23.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 49
MedGen UID:
934602
Concept ID:
C4310635
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-49 (DEE49) is a severe autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of seizures in the neonatal period, global developmental delay with intellectual disability and lack of speech, hypotonia, spasticity, and coarse facial features. Some patients may have brain calcifications on imaging (summary by Han et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Early-onset progressive diffuse brain atrophy-microcephaly-muscle weakness-optic atrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
934638
Concept ID:
C4310671
Disease or Syndrome
PEBAT is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development apparent soon after birth or in infancy, profound intellectual disability, poor or absent speech, and seizures. Most patients are never able to walk due to hypotonia or spasticity. Brain imaging shows cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, and secondary hypomyelination. The disorder shows progressive features, including microcephaly, consistent with a neurodegenerative process (summary by Miyake et al., 2016; Flex et al., 2016).
Intellectual disability-epilepsy-extrapyramidal syndrome
MedGen UID:
934650
Concept ID:
C4310683
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and impaired expressive language and with or without seizures (NEDHELS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypotonia, poor feeding, and global developmental delay apparent from infancy. Most patients have poor overall growth, poor eye contact, sleep disturbances, and severely impaired expressive language. Affected individuals also tend to have behavioral problems, microcephaly, and variable dysmorphic features; many develop seizures. Brain imaging may show enlarged ventricles, thin corpus callosum and brainstem, and white matter abnormalities. The phenotype is variable (summary by Nabais Sa et al., 2019).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 47
MedGen UID:
934652
Concept ID:
C4310685
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-47 (DEE47) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of intractable seizures in the first days or weeks of life. EEG shows background slowing and multifocal epileptic spikes, and may show hypsarrhythmia. Most patients have developmental regression after seizure onset and show persistent intellectual disability and neurologic impairment, although the severity is variable. Treatment with phenytoin, a voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, may be beneficial (summary by Guella et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 43
MedGen UID:
934679
Concept ID:
C4310712
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-43 (DEE43) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of various types of seizures usually in the first year of life. The age at onset is highly variable, ranging from the neonatal period to about 12 months of age. Later onset may rarely occur. Seizure types include febrile, infantile spasms, focal, tonic-clonic, and myoclonic; they tend to be refractory to treatment. Affected individuals show global developmental delay with mild to moderate intellectual disability, although some may have normal early development before the onset of seizures. EEG shows focal, multifocal, or generalized sharp waves associated with seizures, sometimes with hypsarrhythmia. Additional more variable features include tube feeding, hypotonia, peripheral hypertonia, ataxia, dyskinesia, and behavioral difficulties, including aggression, ADHD, stereotypic, and impulsive behavior (summary by the Epi4K Consortium, 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 42
MedGen UID:
934683
Concept ID:
C4310716
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-42 (DEE42) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first hours or days of life, although rare patients may have onset in the first weeks of life. The seizures tend to be refractory and associated with EEG abnormalities, including multifocal spikes and generalized spike-wave complexes. Affected infants show global developmental delay with severely impaired intellectual development. Other features may include axial hypotonia, peripheral hypertonia with hyperreflexia, tremor, ataxia, and abnormal eye movements (summary by the Epi4K Consortium, 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 41
MedGen UID:
934684
Concept ID:
C4310717
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-41 (DEE41) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of seizures in the first days or weeks of life. Affected infants show severely impaired psychomotor development with hypotonia, spasticity, lack of speech, poor visual fixation, feeding difficulties sometimes necessitating tube feeding, poor overall growth and microcephaly, and contractures. Brain imaging may show delayed myelination, thin corpus callosum, and cerebral atrophy (summary by the EPI4K Consortium, 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type IAA
MedGen UID:
934694
Concept ID:
C4310727
Disease or Syndrome
Seizures, benign familial infantile, 5
MedGen UID:
934695
Concept ID:
C4310728
Disease or Syndrome
Benign familial infantile seizures-5 (BFIS5) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset of afebrile seizures during infancy. In most cases, the seizures remit by age 2 years, although some patients may have single or a few seizures later in childhood. The seizures respond well to treatment with sodium channel blockers, and patients have normal subsequent psychomotor development. Some patients may develop paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia around puberty (summary by Gardella et al., 2016 and Anand et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of benign familial infantile seizures, see BFIS1 (601764).
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
934713
Concept ID:
C4310746
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 37
MedGen UID:
934737
Concept ID:
C4310770
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-37 (DEE37) is an autosomal recessive epileptic-dyskinetic neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of intractable seizures or abnormal movements in the first months or years of life. Patients typically have normal or only mildly delayed development in early infancy, but then show developmental regression and stagnation after the onset of seizures, which can occur between about 6 months to 2 years of age. In addition to epileptic encephalopathy, affected individuals also manifest a hyperkinetic movement disorder with choreoathetosis, spasticity, and rigidity. There is severely impaired intellectual development and function, loss of verbal skills with absent speech, and impaired volitional movements (summary by Madeo et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 42
MedGen UID:
934741
Concept ID:
C4310774
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
GNB1 encephalopathy (GNB1-E) is characterized by moderate-to-severe developmental delay / intellectual disability, structural brain abnormalities, and often infantile hypotonia and seizures. Other less common findings include dystonia, reduced vision, behavior issues, growth delay, gastrointestinal (GI) problems, genitourinary (GU) abnormalities in males, and cutaneous mastocytosis.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 52
MedGen UID:
1376462
Concept ID:
C4479236
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-52 (DEE52) is a severe autosomal recessive seizure disorder characterized by infantile onset of refractory seizures with resultant delayed global neurologic development. Affected individuals have impaired intellectual development and may have other persistent neurologic abnormalities, including axial hypotonia and spasticity; death in childhood may occur (summary by Patino et al., 2009 and Ramadan et al., 2017). Some patients with DEE52 may have a clinical diagnosis of Dravet syndrome (607208), which is characterized by the onset of seizures in the first year or 2 of life after normal early development. Developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, and behavioral abnormalities usually become apparent later between 1 and 4 years of age. Dravet syndrome may also include 'severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy' (SMEI) (summary by Patino et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 53
MedGen UID:
1374886
Concept ID:
C4479313
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-53 (DEE53) is a severe autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of intractable seizures in infancy. Affected individuals show hypotonia and very poor or absent global development, resulting in severe intellectual disability and spastic quadriplegia. Some patients may die in childhood (summary by Hardies et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 54
MedGen UID:
1392637
Concept ID:
C4479319
Disease or Syndrome
HNRNPU-related neurodevelopmental disorder (HNRNPU-NDD) is characterized by developmental delay and intellectual disability – typically moderate to severe – with speech and language delay and/or absent speech. Affected individuals may also display autistic features. There may be feeding difficulties during the neonatal period as well as hypotonia, which often remains lifelong. Dysmorphic features have been described but they are nonspecific. Affected individuals are likely to experience seizures (most commonly tonic-clonic or absence) that may be refractory to treatment. Nonspecific brain MRI findings include ventriculomegaly and thinning of the corpus callosum. Less common findings include cardiac abnormalities, strabismus, undescended testes in males, renal anomalies, and skeletal features, including joint laxity, polydactyly, and scoliosis. Rarely, abnormal breathing patterns, including hyperventilation and apnea, may be present and can lead to sleep disturbance.
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 1, neurogenic, with myelin defect
MedGen UID:
1373185
Concept ID:
C4479539
Disease or Syndrome
AMC1 is an autosomal recessive severe neurologic disorder with onset in utero. Most affected individuals die in utero or are subject to pregnancy termination because of lack of fetal movements and prenatal evidence of contractures of virtually all joints. Those who survive have generalized contractures and hypotonia. The disorder is caused by a neurogenic defect and poor or absent myelin formation around peripheral nerves rather than by a muscular defect (summary by Xue et al., 2017). <Genetic Heterogeneity of Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita Also see AMC2 (208100), caused by mutation in the ERGIC1 gene (617946); AMC3 (618484), caused by mutation in the SYNE1 gene (608441); AMC4 (618776), caused by mutation in the SCYL2 gene (616365); AMC5 (618947), caused by mutation in the TOR1A gene (605204), and AMC6 (619334), caused by mutation in the NEB gene (161650)
Neurodevelopmental disorder with involuntary movements
MedGen UID:
1374697
Concept ID:
C4479569
Disease or Syndrome
NEDIM is a neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and infantile or childhood onset of hyperkinetic involuntary movements, including chorea and athetosis. The abnormal movements can be severe, sometimes resulting in inability to sit, walk, speak, or eat. Hyperkinetic movements can be exacerbated by specific triggers, such as stress, illness, or high temperature. Some patients have brain abnormalities, such as cerebral atrophy or thin corpus callosum, and some patients may develop seizures (summary by Ananth et al., 2016 and Danti et al., 2017).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 45
MedGen UID:
1616472
Concept ID:
C4539848
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, ataxia, and seizures
MedGen UID:
1613354
Concept ID:
C4540188
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, ataxia, and seizures (NEDMAS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay and early-onset seizures. More variable features may include deafness, cardiomyopathy, and severe febrile decompensations (summary by Ravel et al., 2021).
Epileptic encephalopathy, infantile or early childhood, 1
MedGen UID:
1626137
Concept ID:
C4540199
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-91 (DEE91) is characterized by delayed psychomotor development apparent in infancy and resulting in severely to profoundly impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech. Most patients never achieve independent walking. Patients typically have onset of refractory multifocal seizures between the first weeks and years of life, and some may show developmental regression. Additional features, such as hypotonia and cortical visual impairment, are more variable (summary by Myers et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 53
MedGen UID:
1623344
Concept ID:
C4540481
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 54
MedGen UID:
1614787
Concept ID:
C4540484
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis defect 15
MedGen UID:
1615160
Concept ID:
C4540520
Disease or Syndrome
GPIBD15 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, variable intellectual disability, hypotonia, early-onset seizures in most patients, and cerebellar atrophy, resulting in cerebellar signs including gait ataxia and dysarthria. The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis (summary by Nguyen et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Epilepsy, familial temporal lobe, 1
MedGen UID:
1643229
Concept ID:
C4551957
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF) is a focal epilepsy syndrome with auditory symptoms and/or receptive aphasia as prominent ictal manifestations. The most common auditory symptoms are simple unformed sounds including humming, buzzing, or ringing; less common forms are distortions (e.g., volume changes) or complex sounds (e.g., specific songs or voices). Ictal receptive aphasia consists of a sudden onset of inability to understand language in the absence of general confusion. Less commonly, other ictal symptoms may occur, including sensory symptoms (visual, olfactory, vertiginous, or cephalic) or motor, psychic, and autonomic symptoms. Most affected individuals have focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizures, usually accompanied by "focal aware" and "focal impaired-awareness" seizures, with auditory symptoms as a major focal aware seizure manifestation. Some persons have seizures precipitated by sounds such as a ringing telephone. Age at onset is usually in adolescence or early adulthood (range: age 4-50 years). The clinical course of ADEAF is benign. Seizures are usually well controlled after initiation of medical therapy.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 55, with seizures
MedGen UID:
1635938
Concept ID:
C4693371
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay and seizures with or without movement abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1641343
Concept ID:
C4693376
Disease or Syndrome
DEDSM is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, variable intellectual disability, and early-onset seizures with a myoclonic component. Most patients have delayed motor development and show abnormal movements, including ataxia, dystonia, and tremor (summary by Hamdan et al., 2017).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, epilepsy, and brain atrophy
MedGen UID:
1637443
Concept ID:
C4693390
Disease or Syndrome
NEDMEBA is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by global developmental delay, severe intellectual disability with poor or absent speech and autistic stereotypic behaviors, microcephaly, early-onset generalized seizures, and hypotonia (summary by Marin-Valencia et al., 2018).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 59
MedGen UID:
1633749
Concept ID:
C4693550
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-59 (DEE59) is characterized by severe global developmental delay apparent in infancy with onset of various types of seizures in the first months of life (range 3 to 11 months). The seizures are usually refractory and are often associated with hypsarrhythmia on EEG, although brain imaging is usually normal. More severely affected individuals may be unable to speak or walk, have poor interaction, and require a feeding tube (summary by the EuroEPINOMICS-RES Consortium et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic, susceptibility to, 10
MedGen UID:
1647781
Concept ID:
C4693613
Finding
Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy-10 is an autosomal dominant seizure disorder with variable manifestations, even within families. Affected individuals have febrile, myoclonic, tonic-clonic, or absence seizures, although several seizure types can occur in the same individual. The age of onset also shows great variability: some patients present in the first years of life, whereas other have onset of seizures in teenage years. EEG typically shows 3.5 to 5 Hz polyspike wave discharges. There is evidence of incomplete penetrance (summary by Bailey et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, see 254770.
Epilepsy, familial focal, with variable foci 4
MedGen UID:
1644614
Concept ID:
C4693694
Disease or Syndrome
SCN3A-related neurodevelopmental disorder (SCN3A-ND) encompasses a spectrum of clinical severity associated with epilepsy and/or brain malformation. Affected individuals may have (a) developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE) (i.e., intractable seizures with developmental delays associated with ongoing epileptiform EEG activity) with or without malformations of cortical development; or (b) malformations of cortical development with or without mild focal epilepsy. Some degree of early childhood developmental delay is seen in all affected individuals; the severity varies widely, ranging from isolated speech delay to severe developmental delay. Infantile hypotonia is common but may be mild or absent in those without DEE. In those with DEE, seizure onset is typically in the first six to 12 months of life. A variety of seizure types have been described. Seizures remain intractable to multiple anti-seizure medications in approximately 50% of individuals with DEE without malformations of cortical development (MCD) and in 90% of individuals with DEE and MCD. Seizures may be absent or infrequent in those without DEE. Brain MRI findings range from normal to showing thinning or hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, to various malformations of cortical development. Autonomic dysregulation, oromotor dysfunction leading to the need for gastrostomy tube placement, progressive microcephaly, hyperkinetic movement disorder, and cortical visual impairment can also be seen in those with DEE.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 63
MedGen UID:
1646846
Concept ID:
C4693810
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-63 (DEE63) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by early-onset refractory infantile spasms and myoclonic seizures in the first months to years of life. Affected individuals have severe to profound developmental delay, often with hypotonia and inability to sit or speak (summary by Redler et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Jaberi-Elahi syndrome
MedGen UID:
1647359
Concept ID:
C4693848
Disease or Syndrome
JABELS is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by developmental delay and intellectual disability with additional variable features. Patients have onset of symptoms in infancy, but the severity is highly variable. Some patients have social interaction and learn to walk but have an ataxic gait and abnormal movements, such as tremor or dystonia, whereas others do not achieve any motor control and are unable to speak. Additional features may include retinal anomalies, visual impairment, microcephaly, abnormal foot or hand posturing, and kyphoscoliosis; some patients have dysmorphic facial features or seizures. Brain imaging typically shows cerebellar atrophy and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (summary by et al., 2016 and Bertoli-Avella et al., 2018).
Epileptic encephalopathy, infantile or early childhood, 3
MedGen UID:
1642888
Concept ID:
C4693934
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE93) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, early-onset refractory seizures, and impaired intellectual development. The severity of the phenotype is highly variable: some patients may be nonverbal and nonambulatory with spastic quadriparesis and poor eye contact, whereas others have moderate intellectual disability (summary by Fassio et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 12
MedGen UID:
1648278
Concept ID:
C4746984
Disease or Syndrome
Glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis defect 17
MedGen UID:
1648437
Concept ID:
C4747891
Disease or Syndrome
Glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis defect-17 (GPIBD17) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by variable neurologic deficits that become apparent in infancy or early childhood. Patients may present with early-onset febrile or afebrile seizures that tend to be mild or controllable. Other features may include learning disabilities, autism, behavioral abnormalities, hypotonia, and motor deficits. The phenotype is relatively mild compared to that of other GPIBDs (summary by Nguyen et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 66
MedGen UID:
1648486
Concept ID:
C4748070
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-66 (DEE66) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first days or weeks of life. Most seizures have focal origins; secondary generalization is common. Seizure control is difficult at first, but may become easier with time. Affected individuals show global developmental delay with hypotonia, behavioral abnormalities, and dysmorphic features or ophthalmologic defects. Brain imaging often shows cerebellar dysgenesis. A subset of patients have extraneurologic manifestations, including hematologic and distal limb abnormalities (summary by Olson et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with epilepsy and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum
MedGen UID:
1648487
Concept ID:
C4748137
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia 48
MedGen UID:
1648409
Concept ID:
C4748158
Disease or Syndrome
SCA48 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of gait ataxia and/or cognitive-affective symptoms in midadulthood. Patients may present with involvement of either system, but most eventually develop impairment in both. Features include gait ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia, as well as cognitive decline, deficits in executive function, and psychiatric or affective manifestations, such as depression, anxiety, and apathy. Additional more variable features may include movement abnormalities, such as parkinsonism, tremor, chorea, dystonia, and dysmetria; spasticity is not observed. Brain imaging shows selective atrophy of the posterior areas of the cerebellar vermis, often with bilateral T2-weighted hyperintensities in the dentate nuclei (the 'crab sign'), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may show paucity of cerebellar connections to the brainstem and cerebrum. The presentation is consistent with a clinical diagnosis of cerebellar cognitive-affective syndrome (CCAS). The phenotype shows both inter- and intrafamilial variability as well as some clinical overlap with SCAR16, suggesting that mutations in the STUB1 gene result in a spectrum of neurodegenerative manifestations (summary by Genis et al., 2018; Cocozza et al., 2020; Palvadeau et al., 2020; Ravel et al., 2021). Magri et al. (2022) found evidence that heterozygous STUB1 variants alone do not cause disease but require a concurrent expanded repeat allele of the TBP gene (600075) for disease manifestation; see MOLECULAR GENETICS.
Mitochondrial complex 5 (ATP synthase) deficiency nuclear type 5
MedGen UID:
1648429
Concept ID:
C4748269
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 67
MedGen UID:
1648285
Concept ID:
C4748341
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-67 (DEE67) is characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first months of life, although later onset may occur in milder cases. The seizures tend to be resistant to treatment. Affected individuals have global developmental delay with impaired motor and intellectual development, poor or absent speech, movement disorders, and stereotypic or autistic behavior (summary by Chatron et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis defect 18
MedGen UID:
1648478
Concept ID:
C4748357
Disease or Syndrome
DEE95 is a severe autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by severely impaired global development, hypotonia, weakness, ataxia, coarse facial features, and intractable seizures. More variable features may include abnormalities of the hands and feet, inguinal hernia, and feeding difficulties. The disorder is part of a group of similar neurologic disorders resulting from biochemical defects in the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthetic pathway (summary by Nguyen et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Bone marrow failure syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
1648380
Concept ID:
C4748488
Disease or Syndrome
Bone marrow failure syndrome-5 (BMFS5) is a hematologic disorder characterized by infantile onset of severe red cell anemia requiring transfusion. Additional features include hypogammaglobulinemia, poor growth with microcephaly, developmental delay, and seizures (summary by Toki et al., 2018) For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (614675).
Neurodegeneration, childhood-onset, stress-induced, with variable ataxia and seizures
MedGen UID:
1648391
Concept ID:
C4748527
Disease or Syndrome
Stress-induced childhood-onset neurodegeneration with variable ataxia and seizures (CONDSIAS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with onset in the first years of life following normal early development. Patient have cyclic episodic deterioration in response to stress, such as infection or febrile illness. The severity is highly variable: some patients develop seizures early in life that are associated with loss of developmental milestones and early sudden death in childhood, whereas others present at a later age with muscle weakness, gait ataxia, impaired speech, more subtle clinical deterioration, and cognitive decline. Neurologic involvement includes gait ataxia, cerebellar signs associated with cerebellar atrophy, generalized brain atrophy, impaired intellectual development, hearing loss, and peripheral neuropathy (summary by Ghosh et al., 2018).
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 13
MedGen UID:
1648370
Concept ID:
C4748770
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 15
MedGen UID:
1648320
Concept ID:
C4748778
Disease or Syndrome
Familial temporal lobe epilepsy 2
MedGen UID:
1683026
Concept ID:
C4759869
Disease or Syndrome
Familial temporal lobe epilepsy (FTLE, ETL) is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome characterized by relatively benign simple or complex partial seizures with intense psychic or autonomic auras (Berkovic et al., 1996). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of temporal lobe epilepsy, see ETL1 (600512).
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 6
MedGen UID:
1681379
Concept ID:
C5190805
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy-6 (EPM6) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of ataxia in the first years of life, followed by action myoclonus and seizures later in childhood, and loss of independent ambulation in the second decade. Cognition is not usually affected, although mild memory difficulties may occur in the third decade (summary by Corbett et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 8
MedGen UID:
1680582
Concept ID:
C5190825
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy-8 (EPM8) is a rare autosomal recessive form of progressive myoclonic epilepsy with phenotypic variability including ataxia and other movement disorders in addition to myoclonus (summary by Godeiro et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Intellectual developmental disorder with cardiac defects and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1675627
Concept ID:
C5193024
Disease or Syndrome
IDDCDF is an autosomal recessive syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by globally impaired development with intellectual disability and speech delay, congenital cardiac malformations, and dysmorphic facial features. Additional features, such as distal skeletal anomalies, may also be observed (Stephen et al., 2018).
Lissencephaly 9 with complex brainstem malformation
MedGen UID:
1681109
Concept ID:
C5193029
Disease or Syndrome
Lissencephaly-9 with complex brainstem malformation (LIS9) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent since infancy, impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech, and sometimes abnormal or involuntary movements associated with abnormal brain imaging that typically shows pachygyria, lissencephaly, and malformation of the brainstem consistent with a neuronal migration defect (summary by Dobyns et al., 2018). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Houge-Janssens syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1677130
Concept ID:
C5193048
Disease or Syndrome
Houge-Janssens syndrome-3 (HJS3) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy. The phenotype is highly variable: patients may have hypotonia, behavioral abnormalities, and abnormalities on brain imaging, including enlarged ventricles, thin corpus callosum, and sometimes small brainstem. Many develop seizures, sometimes refractory, and some may have nonspecific dysmorphic features. Intellectual impairment can vary from mild to profound, and some patients may benefit from special education and respond well to speech therapy (summary by Reynhout et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HJS, see HJS1 (616355).
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 15
MedGen UID:
1675524
Concept ID:
C5193050
Finding
Susceptibility to idiopathic generalized epilepsy-15 (EIG15) is an autosomal dominant seizure disorder characterized by onset of variable types of seizures in the first decade. Absence seizures are the most common manifestation, but most patients also develop other types, including clonic or generalized tonic-clonic seizures. EEG tends to show 3-Hz spike-wave discharges, whereas brain imaging is normal. The majority of patients also have developmental delay associated with impaired intellectual development apparent from infancy or early childhood (summary by Rudolf et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of idiopathic generalized epilepsy, see EIG (600669).
Facial dysmorphism, hypertrichosis, epilepsy, intellectual/developmental delay, and gingival overgrowth syndrome
MedGen UID:
1679105
Concept ID:
C5193066
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome characterized by variable intellectual disability and/or developmental delay, epilepsy, generalized hypertrichosis, severe gingival overgrowth and visual impairment in some patients. Common craniofacial features include bitemporal narrowing, bushy and straight eyebrows, long eyelashes, low-set ears, deep/short philtrum, everted upper lip, prominent upper and lower vermilion, wide mouth, micrognathia, and retrognathia.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 74
MedGen UID:
1680535
Concept ID:
C5193074
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-74 (DEE74) is neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of refractory seizures in the first months of life. Seizure types are variable and include infantile spasms, myoclonic, tonic, atonic, and absence, often with secondary generalization. Affected individuals have severe global developmental delay with hypotonia, severe motor impairment, roving eye movements, and absent language (summary by Shen et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with impaired speech and hyperkinetic movements
MedGen UID:
1681181
Concept ID:
C5193088
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with impaired speech and hyperkinetic movements (NEDISHM) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent in infancy. Most patients have mildly delayed walking, speech and language delay, and a hyperkinetic movement disorder with dystonia, tremor, ataxia, or chorea. Some may develop seizures that tend to abate (summary by Khan et al., 2019).
Encephalopathy, acute, infection-induced, susceptibility to, 9
MedGen UID:
1673394
Concept ID:
C5193089
Finding
Susceptibility to acute infection-induced encephalopathy-9 (IIAE9) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by episodic acute neurodegeneration and developmental regression associated with infections and febrile illness. Patients present in the first months or years of life, often after normal or only mildly delayed early development. Some patients may have partial recovery between episodes, such as transient ataxia, but the overall disease course is progressive, resulting in global developmental delay, abnormal movements, refractory seizures, microcephaly, and cerebellar atrophy (summary by Fichtman et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of susceptibility to acute infection-induced encephalopathy, see 610551.
Intellectual developmental disorder with severe speech and ambulation defects
MedGen UID:
1682234
Concept ID:
C5193115
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with severe speech and ambulation defects (IDDSSAD) is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder with onset of features in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals have global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and absent speech, and most cannot walk independently. Common dysmorphic features include prominent forehead and wide mouth (summary by Bell et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and nonepileptic hyperkinetic movements
MedGen UID:
1678038
Concept ID:
C5193128
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and nonepileptic hyperkinetic movements (NEDNEH) is an autosomal recessive severe neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development with inability to walk or speak, early-onset refractory seizures, and nonepileptic hyperkinetic movement disorders, including myoclonus dystonia and dyskinesias. Patients require tube feeding and may die of respiratory failure in childhood or in the second decade (summary by Gorman et al., 2019).
Neuromuscular disease and ocular or auditory anomalies with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1684689
Concept ID:
C5231483
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder 60 with seizures
MedGen UID:
1684702
Concept ID:
C5231497
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-60 with seizures is characterized by global developmental delay apparent in infancy, followed by onset of seizures in the first years of life. Patients have delayed walking, an ataxic gait, and moderately to severely impaired intellectual development with poor speech (summary by Helbig et al., 2019).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 85, with or without midline brain defects
MedGen UID:
1708832
Concept ID:
C5393312
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-85 with or without midline brain defects (DEE85) is an X-linked neurologic disorder characterized by onset of severe refractory seizures in the first year of life, global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and poor or absent speech, and dysmorphic facial features. The seizures tend to show a cyclic pattern with clustering. Many patients have midline brain defects on brain imaging, including thin corpus callosum and/or variable forms of holoprosencephaly (HPE). The severity and clinical manifestations are variable. Almost all reported patients are females with de novo mutations predicted to result in a loss of function (LOF). However, some patients may show skewed X inactivation, and the pathogenic mechanism may be due to a dominant-negative effect. The SMC1A protein is part of the multiprotein cohesin complex involved in chromatid cohesion during DNA replication and transcriptional regulation; DEE85 can thus be classified as a 'cohesinopathy' (summary by Symonds et al., 2017 and Kruszka et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Epilepsy, early-onset, with or without developmental delay
MedGen UID:
1709942
Concept ID:
C5394228
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset epilepsy-2 with or without developmental delay (EPEO2) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the first days, months, or years of life. The severity is highly variable: some patients have normal psychomotor development and normal brain imaging, whereas others may show developmental delay associated with abnormalities on brain imaging (summary by Yu et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EPEO, see 617290.
Diabetes mellitus, permanent neonatal 2
MedGen UID:
1713823
Concept ID:
C5394296
Disease or Syndrome
Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus-2 (PNDM2) is characterized by onset of insulin-requiring hyperglycemia within the first months of life that requires insulin therapy throughout life. Some patients additionally have marked developmental delay, muscle weakness, and epilepsy (Gloyn et al., 2004). The triad of developmental delay, epilepsy, and neonatal diabetes is known as DEND (Shimomura et al., 2007). Proks et al. (2006) stated that heterozygous activating mutations in KCNJ11 are the most common cause of PNDM and account for 26 to 64% of cases, and that neurologic features are found in 20% of patients with KCNJ11 mutations. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus, see PNDM1 (606176).
Lissencephaly 10
MedGen UID:
1719546
Concept ID:
C5394354
Disease or Syndrome
Lissencephaly-10 (LIS10) is a neurologic disorder characterized by variably delayed development with mildly to moderately impaired intellectual development and language delay, as well as seizures, which are often intractable. There is a spectrum of severity, with some patients having normal early development and only borderline to mild cognitive impairment. Brain imaging shows features consistent with neuronal migration defects, including posterior-predominant lissencephaly, pachygyria, agyria, and subcortical band heterotopia (summary by Tsai et al., 2020). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with language impairment and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1708389
Concept ID:
C5394502
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with speech impairment and behavioral abnormalities (NEDLIB) is characterized by impaired intellectual development or developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities including autistic features, and language impairment. Other features include seizures and developmental regression (Salpietro et al., 2019).
Episodic ataxia, type 9
MedGen UID:
1714171
Concept ID:
C5394520
Disease or Syndrome
Episodic ataxia type 9 (EA9) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of ataxic episodes in the first years of life. Features may include difficulty walking, dizziness, slurred speech, headache, vomiting, and pain. The ataxic episodes vary in frequency and duration; most tend to occur every few weeks or months and last minutes to hours. Prior to the EA, most patients have neonatal- or infantile-onset tonic or generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures that may be severe and refractory to medication, but remit later in infancy or early childhood, either spontaneously or concurrently with medication. Some patients have mildly delayed development with speech delay and/or autistic features or mildly impaired intellectual development. However, others show normal psychomotor development. Treatment of the ataxic episodes with acetazolamide is effective in about 50% of patients (summary by Schwarz et al., 2019). For a phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of episodic ataxia, see EA1 (160120).
Intellectual developmental disorder with seizures and language delay
MedGen UID:
1740295
Concept ID:
C5436574
Disease or Syndrome
SETD1B-related neurodevelopmental disorder (SETD1B-NDD) is characterized by developmental delay (mainly affecting speech and language), intellectual disability, seizures, autism spectrum disorder or autism-like behaviors, and additional behavioral concerns. Speech delay and/or language disorder has been reported in most affected individuals. Delay in gross motor skills and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability are common. Most affected individuals have seizures with variable onset and seizure type. Behavioral issues including hyperactivity, aggression, anxiety, and sleep disorders have been reported in approximately half of individuals. Less common features include ophthalmologic manifestations and feeding issues.
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 21
MedGen UID:
1732562
Concept ID:
C5436727
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 21 (MC4DN21) is an autosomal recessive multisystem metabolic disorder characterized by the onset of symptoms in infancy. Affected individuals present with congenital lactic acidosis and later show global developmental delay with delayed speech and learning disabilities. Additional features include motor dysfunction manifest as spasticity, dystonia, and pyramidal tract signs. Ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, and seizures may also occur. Brain imaging shows T2-weighted hyperintensities in subcortical regions, consistent with a clinical diagnosis of Leigh syndrome (see 256000). Patient tissues show variably decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV (Pitceathly et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without early-onset generalized epilepsy
MedGen UID:
1737097
Concept ID:
C5436914
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without early-onset generalized epilepsy (NEDEGE) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals have variably impaired intellectual development, speech delay, and behavioral abnormalities. About half of patients develop early-onset generalized epilepsy with different seizure types; myoclonic seizures and myoclonic-atonic epilepsy are commonly observed. The seizures may remit with age or remain refractory to treatment. Brain imaging is essentially normal and there are no significant accompanying neurologic or systemic abnormalities (summary by Mulhern et al., 2018).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 90
MedGen UID:
1786502
Concept ID:
C5542345
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-90 (DEE90) is an X-linked neurologic disorder characterized by onset of refractory seizures in the first days or months of life. Although most patients have focal seizures associated with oromotor automatisms and apnea, various seizure types may occur, including epileptic spasms, generalized tonic-clonic, and absence. EEG shows multifocal discharges; hypsarrhythmia, intermittent burst suppression, and slow spike-wave background resembling Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may also be observed. Affected individuals have global developmental delay with variable severity, but it is usually profound or severe. Some are unable to walk or speak, whereas others may achieve some milestones and show autistic features (summary by Fry et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Epilepsy, progressive myoclonic, 12
MedGen UID:
1778162
Concept ID:
C5543069
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy-12 (EPM12) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of tonic-clonic seizures and/or myoclonus in the second decade of life. Affected individuals develop cerebellar ataxia associated with progressive cerebral and cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. Most patients lose ambulation and become wheelchair-bound. Additional more variable features include mild cognitive dysfunction or psychiatric manifestations, such as depression or anxiety (summary by Mazzola et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Microcephaly, epilepsy, and diabetes syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1782107
Concept ID:
C5543294
Disease or Syndrome
MEDS2 is characterized by severe microcephaly and neonatal/early-onset epilepsy and diabetes (De Franco et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of microcephaly, epilepsy, and diabetes syndrome, see MEDS1 (614231).
KINSSHIP syndrome
MedGen UID:
1779339
Concept ID:
C5543317
Disease or Syndrome
KINSSHIP syndrome (KINS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a recognizable pattern of anomalies including developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, seizures, mesomelic dysplasia, dysmorphic facial features, horseshoe or hypoplastic kidney, and failure to thrive (summary by Voisin et al., 2021).
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia, type 14
MedGen UID:
1778516
Concept ID:
C5543322
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 14 (PCH14) is a severe autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by congenital onset of progressive microcephaly and poor or absent psychomotor development with severely impaired intellectual development apparent from birth. Other features may include hypotonia, spastic quadriplegia, and early-onset seizures. Brain imaging shows pontocerebellar hypoplasia, agenesis or partial agenesis of the corpus callosum, and sometimes a simplified gyral pattern. Early death may occur (summary by et al., 2021). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1A (607596).
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia, type 15
MedGen UID:
1781311
Concept ID:
C5543326
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 15 (PCH15) is a severe autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by congenital onset of progressive microcephaly and poor or absent psychomotor development with severely impaired intellectual development apparent from birth. Other features may include spastic quadriplegia, early-onset seizures, and chronic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Brain imaging shows pontocerebellar hypoplasia and partial agenesis of the corpus callosum (summary by et al., 2021). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1A (607596).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 6B
MedGen UID:
1779648
Concept ID:
C5543353
Disease or Syndrome
SCN1A seizure disorders encompass a spectrum that ranges from simple febrile seizures and generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) at the mild end to Dravet syndrome and intractable childhood epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (ICE-GTC) at the severe end. Phenotypes with intractable seizures including Dravet syndrome are often associated with cognitive decline. Less commonly observed phenotypes include myoclonic astatic epilepsy (MAE), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, infantile spasms, epilepsy with focal seizures, and vaccine-related encephalopathy and seizures. The phenotype of SCN1A seizure disorders can vary even within the same family.
CATARACTS, SPASTIC PARAPARESIS, AND SPEECH DELAY
MedGen UID:
1778818
Concept ID:
C5543440
Disease or Syndrome
Cataracts, spastic paraparesis, and speech delay (CSPSD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by spastic paraparesis and bilateral congenital/juvenile cataracts. Speech delay is a common feature (Ferdinandusse et al., 2021).
Onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, impaired intellectual development, and seizures syndrome
MedGen UID:
1788511
Concept ID:
C5543496
Disease or Syndrome
Onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, impaired intellectual development, and seizures syndrome (OORS) is an autosomal recessive syndromic developmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, dysmorphic facial features, and hypoplastic terminal phalanges and nails. Patients have seizures or tonic posturing. The disorder is associated with a defect in GPI anchoring of membrane-bound proteins (summary by Salian et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293). See also DOORS syndrome (220500), which shows some overlapping clinical features.
Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, 6B (Kufs type)
MedGen UID:
1794137
Concept ID:
C5561927
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-6B (CLN6B) is an autosomal recessive form of 'Kufs disease,' which refers in general to adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis without retinal involvement. CLN6B is a neurodegenerative disorder with a mean onset of symptoms at around age 28 years, although onset in the teens and later adulthood may also occur. Patients typically present with progressive myoclonus epilepsy, ataxia, loss of motor function, dysarthria, progressive dementia, and progressive cerebral and cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. Ultrastructural examination typically shows fingerprint profiles and granular osmiophilic deposits in some tissues, including brain samples (summary by Arsov et al., 2011 and Berkovic et al., 2019). However, pathologic findings in peripheral tissues in adults is not as accurate for diagnosis as it is in children with the disease (Cherian et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CLN, see CLN1 (256730).
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 17
MedGen UID:
1794141
Concept ID:
C5561931
Finding
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794148
Concept ID:
C5561938
Disease or Syndrome
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and neurodevelopmental syndrome (FSGSNEDS) is characterized by global developmental delay and renal dysfunction manifest as proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome apparent from infancy or early childhood. Some patients present with renal disease, whereas others present with developmental delay and develop renal disease later in childhood. Renal biopsy shows focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), but the course of the disease is variable: some patients have transient proteinuria and others require renal transplant. Neurodevelopmental features are also variable, with some patients having only mildly impaired intellectual development, and others having a severe developmental disorder associated with early-onset refractory seizures or epileptic encephalopathy. Additional features, including feeding difficulties, poor overall growth, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, are commonly observed (summary by Assoum et al., 2018 and Weng et al., 2021).
Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
1794149
Concept ID:
C5561939
Disease or Syndrome
Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome-4 (RTSC4) is characterized by a constellation of congenital anomalies, including dysmorphic craniofacial features and structural brain anomalies, such as Dandy-Walker malformation (220200), hindbrain malformations, or agenesis of the corpus callosum, associated with global developmental delay and impaired intellectual development. Congenital cardiac defects have been reported in 1 family (summary by Ritscher et al., 1987 and Jeanne et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome, see RTSC1 (220210).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794187
Concept ID:
C5561977
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and brain abnormalities (NEDHYBA) is characterized by impaired development of motor skills, cognitive function, and speech acquisition beginning in infancy or early childhood. Some affected individuals may have feeding difficulties, seizures, behavioral abnormalities, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features. Brain imaging shows variable abnormalities, including corpus callosum defects, cerebellar defects, and decreased white matter volume. There is significant phenotypic variability (summary by Duncan et al., 2021).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with impaired language and ataxia and with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1794216
Concept ID:
C5562006
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with impaired language and ataxia and with or without seizures (NEDLAS) is characterized by axial hypotonia and global developmental delay apparent in early infancy. Affected individuals have delayed walking with gait ataxia and poor language development. Behavioral abnormalities also commonly occur. The severity is highly variable: a subset of patients have a more severe phenotype with early-onset seizures resembling epileptic encephalopathy, inability to walk or speak, and hypomyelination on brain imaging (summary by Stolz et al., 2021).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 98
MedGen UID:
1794227
Concept ID:
C5562017
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-98 (DEE98) is characterized by onset of seizures in the first decade (range infancy to late childhood) associated with variable global developmental delay. Other features may include hypotonia, spasticity, and quadriparesis. Brain imaging may be normal or show nonspecific and variable abnormalities, including polymicrogyria. The severity is variable; some patients may die of refractory status epilepticus (summary by Vetro et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 99
MedGen UID:
1794228
Concept ID:
C5562018
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-99 (DEE99) is characterized by onset of seizures in early childhood associated with global developmental delay and severely impaired intellectual development. Other features may include hypotonia, quadriparesis, nystagmus, and apnea. Brain imaging may be normal or show nonspecific and variable abnormalities, including cerebral atrophy and polymicrogyria. The severity is variable; some patients die of refractory status epilepticus (summary by Vetro et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hearing loss and spasticity
MedGen UID:
1794234
Concept ID:
C5562024
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hearing loss and spasticity (NEDHLS) is characterized by hearing loss, global developmental delay/impaired intellectual development, spastic-dystonic cerebral palsy, focal or generalized epilepsy, and microcephaly. Some children present with hypotonia (Richard et al., 2021).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and gross motor and speech delay
MedGen UID:
1794241
Concept ID:
C5562031
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and gross motor and speech delay (NEDHMS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe global developmental delay apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have axial hypotonia and limited ability to walk, including some who are nonambulatory with lower limb spasticity, impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech and language. Additional more variable features may include seizures, behavioral problems, distal skeletal anomalies, and dysmorphic facial features (Melo et al., 2021).
Yoon-Bellen neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794276
Concept ID:
C5562066
Disease or Syndrome
Yoon-Bellen neurodevelopmental syndrome (YOBELN) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized mainly by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development. The manifestations and severity of the phenotype are highly variable. Additional neurologic features may include hypotonia, spasticity, ataxia, hearing loss, visual problems, seizures, and nonspecific anomalies on brain imaging (summary by Yap et al., 2021).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 27
MedGen UID:
1799031
Concept ID:
C5567608
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-27 (COXPD27) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized mainly by neurologic features, including delayed development, seizures, abnormal movements, and neurologic regression. Age at onset, ranging from infancy to late childhood, and severity are variable. Other features include hypotonia, myoclonus, brain imaging abnormalities, and evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. Liver dysfunction has also been reported (summary by Samanta et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities, with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1811329
Concept ID:
C5575272
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities, with or without seizures (DEDISB) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by variably impaired skill acquisition apparent from infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals have predominant language delay with mild fine and gross motor deficits, although they usually are ambulatory by around 3 years of age. Most patients have mild to moderately impaired intellectual development and behavioral abnormalities, including aggression, hyperactivity, and autism spectrum disorder. About half of individuals develop various types of seizures that may be refractory in some. More variable features include dysmorphic facial features, mild ocular anomalies, and nonspecific findings on brain imaging (Thomas et al., 2021).
Intellectual developmental disorder, X-linked, syndromic, Pilorge type
MedGen UID:
1803486
Concept ID:
C5676881
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
The Pilorge type of X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder (MRXSP) is characterized by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development, speech delay, and behavioral abnormalities, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). More variable features include motor incoordination, seizures, and ocular abnormalities (summary by Marcogliese et al., 2022).
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal dominant 69
MedGen UID:
1808299
Concept ID:
C5676896
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-69 (MRD69) is characterized by developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development. Additional features may include intention tremor in infancy and seizures in childhood, with remission of these in adolescence (Alkhater et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without variable movement or behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1802087
Concept ID:
C5676908
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without variable movement or behavioral abnormalities (NEDMAB) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mildly to severely impaired intellectual development and, in some patients, movement abnormalities consisting of tremors, cerebellar ataxia, or extrapyramidal symptoms. Movement abnormalities have onset in childhood or adolescence. Other variable features include autism spectrum disorder or autistic features and epilepsy.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 100
MedGen UID:
1809351
Concept ID:
C5676932
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-100 (DEE100) is a severe neurologic disorder characterized by global developmental delay and onset of variable types of seizures in the first months or years of life. Most patients have refractory seizures and show developmental regression after seizure onset. Affected individuals have ataxic gait or inability to walk and severe to profoundly impaired intellectual development, often with absent speech. Additional more variable features may include axial hypotonia, hyperkinetic movements, dysmorphic facial features, and brain imaging abnormalities (summary by Schneider et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal recessive 75, with neuropsychiatric features and variant lissencephaly
MedGen UID:
1808159
Concept ID:
C5676961
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive intellectual developmental disorder-75 with neuropsychiatric features and variant lissencephaly (MRT75) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy or early childhood and moderate to profoundly impaired intellectual development. Most affected individuals have behavioral abnormalities, including aggression and ADHD; a few have psychiatric manifestations, including psychosis. More variable additional features include well-controlled seizures and dysmorphic facial features. Brain imaging often shows frontal predominant pachygyria or other gyri/sulci abnormalities, consistent with a variant of lissencephaly and a malformation of cortical development (MCD) (summary by Zaki et al., 2021).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type VIIA
MedGen UID:
1813022
Concept ID:
C5676967
Disease or Syndrome
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria (MGCA7) is an inborn error of metabolism characterized primarily by increased levels of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGA) associated with variable neurologic deficits and neutropenia. The phenotype is highly variable: most patients have infantile onset of a severe progressive encephalopathy with various movement abnormalities and delayed psychomotor development. Other common variable features include seizures, recurrent infections due to neutropenia, anemia, and brain imaging abnormalities (Wortmann et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA1 (250950).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1812577
Concept ID:
C5676975
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities (NEDHISB) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent since infancy or early childhood, hypotonia with delayed motor development, impaired intellectual development with significant speech delay or absent speech, and variable behavioral abnormalities, such as autism, repetitive actions, or aggression. About two-thirds of patients have early-onset seizures that range from intractable to self-limiting. More variable features include nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, distal skeletal anomalies, and brain imaging abnormalities. The phenotypic manifestations and severity are highly variable (Muir et al., 2021).
Dentici-Novelli neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1810366
Concept ID:
C5676987
Disease or Syndrome
Dentici-Novelli neurodevelopmental syndrome (DENNED) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development apparent from infancy. The severity of the phenotype is highly variable: more severely affected individuals have axial hypotonia, peripheral spasticity, microcephaly, early-onset seizures, brain imaging abnormalities, and are unable to walk or speak. Those with a less severe phenotype may achieve some developmental goals and show less severe intellectual disability (Dentici et al., 2022).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 102
MedGen UID:
1812769
Concept ID:
C5676991
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-102 (DEE102) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay and severe to profoundly impaired intellectual development with inability to walk or speak. Most patients have onset of variable types of seizures within the first year of life, and the seizures tend to be refractory. Additional features include progressive microcephaly, visual impairment, axial hypotonia, peripheral hypertonia, and nonspecific brain imaging abnormalities (Marafi et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Holoprosencephaly 14
MedGen UID:
1811868
Concept ID:
C5676994
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly-14 (HPE14) is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by severe developmental delay secondary to brain malformations within the holoprosencephaly spectrum (Drissi et al., 2022). For general phenotypic information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of holoprosencephaly, see HPE1 (236100).
Intellectual developmental disorder with language impairment and early-onset DOPA-responsive dystonia-parkinsonism
MedGen UID:
1805453
Concept ID:
C5677001
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with language impairment and early-onset dopa-responsive dystonia-parkinsonism (IDLDP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay affecting motor, cognitive, and speech domains apparent in early childhood or infancy. Some patients may have normal early development in infancy before symptom onset. There is phenotypic heterogeneity and the severity is highly variable; less severely affected individuals have only mild deficits and are able to attend special schools. About half of patients develop various types of seizures that may be refractory or responsive to treatment. Most patients also show movement abnormalities, often hypotonia early in the disease course with later development of dopa-responsive dystonia or parkinsonism (Ramos et al., 2019, Wirth et al., 2020; Singh et al., 2020).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 103
MedGen UID:
1809962
Concept ID:
C5677002
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-103 (DEE103) is characterized by onset of various types of seizures in the first year of life, most of which are refractory to treatment. Affected individuals show global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development ranging from mild to severe. Additional features may include hypotonia, ataxia, and behavioral abnormalities, including autism and hyperactivity (Schwarz et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Epilepsy, X-linked 2, with or without impaired intellectual development and dysmorphic features
MedGen UID:
1823952
Concept ID:
C5774178
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked epilepsy-2 with or without impaired intellectual development and dysmorphic features (EPILX2) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of seizures usually in the first years of life, although later onset may also occur. Most individuals also have developmental delay, speech delay, and intellectual disability or learning difficulties. Some patients have dysmorphic facial features or mild skeletal anomalies. The severity of the disorder and accompanying features are highly variable, even within the same family. In general, males are more severely affected than females, although there is evidence for incomplete penetrance in both sexes (Niturad et al., 2017).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 104
MedGen UID:
1823956
Concept ID:
C5774183
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-104 (DEE104) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by developmental delay in the first few months of life and drug-resistant focal and generalized tonic-clonic seizures (summary by Bott et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 105 with hypopituitarism
MedGen UID:
1823963
Concept ID:
C5774190
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-105 with hypopituitarism (DEE105) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of seizures and pituitary insufficiency in the first weeks or months of life. Affected individuals have profoundly impaired development with almost no acquisition of skills. They are hypotonic, unable to sit or speak, and have poor or absent visual fixation. Endocrine workup shows central pituitary dysfunction with low hormone levels. Brain imaging shows cerebral atrophy, thin corpus callosum, and small pituitary gland (Schanzer et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 106
MedGen UID:
1823985
Concept ID:
C5774212
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-106 (DEE106) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of various types of frequent, often refractory, seizures within the first year of life. Affected individuals demonstrate profound global developmental delay with limited ability to move and severely impaired intellectual development with absent speech. Nonspecific brain abnormalities may be observed on MRI (Ni et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, cerebral atrophy, and visual impairment
MedGen UID:
1823998
Concept ID:
C5774225
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, cerebral atrophy, and visual impairment (NEDMVIC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, facial dysmorphism, and microcephaly (Ziegler et al., 2022).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with short stature, prominent forehead, and feeding difficulties
MedGen UID:
1824001
Concept ID:
C5774228
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with short stature, prominent forehead, and feeding difficulties (NEDSFF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by distinct craniofacial features, multisystem dysfunction, profound neurodevelopmental delays, and neonatal death (Shankar et al., 2022).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 109
MedGen UID:
1824036
Concept ID:
C5774263
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-109 (DEE109) is characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first months or years of life. Affected individuals show developmental delay before and concurrent with the onset of seizures. Features include impaired intellectual development with poor speech, ataxic gait, coordination problems, and behavioral abnormalities (Manivannan et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type IIy
MedGen UID:
1824067
Concept ID:
C5774294
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIy (CDG2Y) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic congenital disorder characterized by poor overall growth and global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development. Other features may include hypotonia, seizures, brain imaging abnormalities, dysmorphic features, and various skeletal defects. Laboratory studies show a subtle type II glycosylation defect of serum transferrin (Tambe et al., 2020). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, dysmorphic facies, and skeletal anomalies, with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1840880
Concept ID:
C5830244
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, dysmorphic facies, and skeletal anomalies, with or without seizures (NEDFSS), is characterized by these features and global developmental delay with delayed or absent walking, moderate to severely impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech acquisition. Affected individuals may also have behavioral abnormalities. About half of patients develop various types of seizures that are usually well-controlled with medication. Rare patients are noted to have heat intolerance or insensitivity to pain (Lines et al., 2022).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with language delay and behavioral abnormalities, with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1841001
Concept ID:
C5830365
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with language delay and behavioral abnormalities, with or without seizures (NEDLBAS), is characterized by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development apparent from infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals have significant speech delay, and most demonstrate behavioral abnormalities, including autistic features. About half of patients develop seizures, which may be controlled or refractory. More variable features include hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and subtle facial dysmorphism (Schalk et al., 2022).
Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
1841010
Concept ID:
C5830374
Disease or Syndrome
The mitochondrial trifunctional protein, composed of 4 alpha and 4 beta subunits, catalyzes 3 steps in mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids: long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD), long-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, and long-chain thiolase activities. Trifunctional protein deficiency is characterized by decreased activity of all 3 enzymes. Clinically, classic trifunctional protein deficiency can be classified into 3 main clinical phenotypes: neonatal onset of a severe, lethal condition resulting in sudden unexplained infant death (SIDS; 272120), infantile onset of a hepatic Reye-like syndrome, and late-adolescent onset of primarily a skeletal myopathy (summary by Spiekerkoetter et al., 2003). Some patients with MTP deficiency show a protracted progressive course associated with myopathy, recurrent rhabdomyolysis, and sensorimotor axonal neuropathy. These patients tend to survive into adolescence and adulthood (den Boer et al., 2003). See mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency-1 (609015), caused by mutation in the HADHA gene (600890), the alpha subunit of mitochondrial trifunctional protein.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly and speech delay, with or without brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1841049
Concept ID:
C5830413
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly and speech delay, with or without brain abnormalities (NEDMSBA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, hypotonia, delayed or absent walking, impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech, apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals have postnatal progressive microcephaly and may show poor overall growth and dysmorphic facial features. Additional more variable features include cortical visual impairment, seizures, hypotonia, spasticity, and sensorineural deafness. Brain imaging is abnormal in most patients, showing myelination defects, cortical atrophy, or thin corpus callosum. There is phenotypic variability, even within families (Bogershausen et al., 2022; Lin et al., 2022).
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal dominant 71, with behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1841073
Concept ID:
C5830437
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-71 with behavioral abnormalities (MRD71) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with hypotonia, speech delay, and variably impaired cognitive development. Almost all affected individuals show marked behavioral manifestations, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), ADHD, hypersensitivity, and aggression. Many have dysmorphic features, although there is not a common gestalt (Harris et al., 2021).
Dystonia 22, juvenile-onset
MedGen UID:
1841281
Concept ID:
C5830645
Disease or Syndrome
Juvenile-onset dystonia-22 (DYT22JO) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive, generalized dystonia associated with cognitive decline and cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging (Mencacci et al., 2021).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Turan FD, İşler Dalgıç A, Duman Ö
Epilepsy Behav 2022 Oct;135:108875. Epub 2022 Aug 17 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2022.108875. PMID: 35986956

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Zhang P, Zhang H, Shi C, Zhou J, Dong J, Liang M, Li R, Cheng J, Chen Y, Yuan J, Chen Y
Epilepsy Behav 2023 Feb;139:109064. Epub 2023 Jan 12 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2022.109064. PMID: 36640483
Faria MT, Rodrigues S, Campelo M, Dias D, Rego R, Rocha H, Sá F, Tavares-Silva M, Pinto R, Pestana G, Oliveira A, Pereira J, Cunha JPS, Rocha-Gonçalves F, Gonçalves H, Martins E
Epilepsy Behav 2022 Jan;126:108453. Epub 2021 Dec 1 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2021.108453. PMID: 34864377
He X, Chaitanya G, Asma B, Caciagli L, Bassett DS, Tracy JI, Sperling MR
Brain 2020 Jan 1;143(1):175-190. doi: 10.1093/brain/awz361. PMID: 31860076Free PMC Article
Langenbruch L, Rickert C, Gosheger G, Schorn D, Schliemann B, Brix T, Elger CE, Meuth SG, Kovac S
Seizure 2019 Aug;70:38-42. Epub 2019 Jun 20 doi: 10.1016/j.seizure.2019.06.025. PMID: 31252362
Koutroumanidis M, Bruno E
Epileptic Disord 2018 Dec 1;20(6):490-501. doi: 10.1684/epd.2018.1014. PMID: 30530414

Diagnosis

Beniczky S, Rubboli G, Covanis A, Sperling MR
Neurology 2020 Oct 6;95(14):e2009-e2015. Epub 2020 Aug 19 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000010470. PMID: 32817392Free PMC Article
Langenbruch L, Rickert C, Gosheger G, Schorn D, Schliemann B, Brix T, Elger CE, Meuth SG, Kovac S
Seizure 2019 Aug;70:38-42. Epub 2019 Jun 20 doi: 10.1016/j.seizure.2019.06.025. PMID: 31252362
Pack AM
Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2019 Apr;25(2):306-321. doi: 10.1212/CON.0000000000000707. PMID: 30921011
Koutroumanidis M, Bruno E
Epileptic Disord 2018 Dec 1;20(6):490-501. doi: 10.1684/epd.2018.1014. PMID: 30530414
Fisher RS, Cross JH, French JA, Higurashi N, Hirsch E, Jansen FE, Lagae L, Moshé SL, Peltola J, Roulet Perez E, Scheffer IE, Zuberi SM
Epilepsia 2017 Apr;58(4):522-530. Epub 2017 Mar 8 doi: 10.1111/epi.13670. PMID: 28276060

Therapy

Lim SC, Lee WG, Kim DW, Kim KK, Shon YM, Park J, Lee Y, Seo DW
Epilepsy Behav 2023 Aug;145:109291. Epub 2023 Jun 17 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2023.109291. PMID: 37336136
Horiguchi A, Koichihara R, Kikuchi K, Nonoyama H, Daida A, Oba D, Hirata Y, Matsuura R, Ohashi H, Hamano SI
Neuropediatrics 2023 Oct;54(5):339-343. Epub 2023 Apr 19 doi: 10.1055/a-2077-1988. PMID: 37075791
Li X, Chen Q, Wang Z, Wang X, Zhang W, Lu J, Zhang X, Wang Z, Zhang B
Epilepsy Behav 2023 Mar;140:109100. Epub 2023 Feb 13 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2023.109100. PMID: 36791632
Moseley BD, Dimova S, Elmoufti S, Laloyaux C, Asadi-Pooya AA
Epilepsy Res 2021 Oct;176:106694. Epub 2021 Jun 24 doi: 10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2021.106694. PMID: 34218211
Langenbruch L, Rickert C, Gosheger G, Schorn D, Schliemann B, Brix T, Elger CE, Meuth SG, Kovac S
Seizure 2019 Aug;70:38-42. Epub 2019 Jun 20 doi: 10.1016/j.seizure.2019.06.025. PMID: 31252362

Prognosis

Resnick T, Patten A, Ngo LY, Malhotra M
Epilepsy Behav 2022 Mar;128:108528. Epub 2022 Jan 22 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2021.108528. PMID: 35078116
Amornpojnimman T, Mitarnun W, Korathanakhun P
Seizure 2022 Mar;96:1-5. Epub 2022 Jan 10 doi: 10.1016/j.seizure.2022.01.005. PMID: 35038621
Park KJ, Seyal M
Epilepsia 2019 Feb;60(2):268-274. Epub 2019 Jan 10 doi: 10.1111/epi.14632. PMID: 30630218
Koutroumanidis M, Bruno E
Epileptic Disord 2018 Dec 1;20(6):490-501. doi: 10.1684/epd.2018.1014. PMID: 30530414
Karthick PA, Tanaka H, Khoo HM, Gotman J
Clin Neurophysiol 2018 May;129(5):1030-1040. Epub 2018 Mar 9 doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2018.02.122. PMID: 29571121

Clinical prediction guides

Amornpojnimman T, Mitarnun W, Korathanakhun P
Seizure 2022 Mar;96:1-5. Epub 2022 Jan 10 doi: 10.1016/j.seizure.2022.01.005. PMID: 35038621
Di Nora A, Costanza G, Pizzo F, Oliva CF, Di Mari A, Greco F, Pavone P
Acta Neurol Belg 2022 Feb;122(1):153-162. Epub 2021 Sep 1 doi: 10.1007/s13760-021-01774-3. PMID: 34471972Free PMC Article
Park KJ, Seyal M
Epilepsia 2019 Feb;60(2):268-274. Epub 2019 Jan 10 doi: 10.1111/epi.14632. PMID: 30630218
Koutroumanidis M, Bruno E
Epileptic Disord 2018 Dec 1;20(6):490-501. doi: 10.1684/epd.2018.1014. PMID: 30530414
Karthick PA, Tanaka H, Khoo HM, Gotman J
Clin Neurophysiol 2018 May;129(5):1030-1040. Epub 2018 Mar 9 doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2018.02.122. PMID: 29571121

Recent systematic reviews

Lu M, Faure M, Bergamasco A, Spalding W, Benitez A, Moride Y, Fournier M
Epilepsy Behav 2020 Nov;112:107459. Epub 2020 Sep 29 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.107459. PMID: 33181886

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